Category Archives: Locations of Historic Interest

Howard Point

Location: East Bay Drive, across from Meyer-Riddle House
Diversity: African-Americans

Detail from Whitham and Page map, 1890, Washington State Archives  

View of Howard Point from East Bay  Drive (2021), photo by Deb Ross

As noted in our Pacific House page, Rebecca Howard was a successful restaurateur in the Port of Olympia. She and her husband Alexander purchased land from Calvin and Pamela Case Hale on the east side of Budd Inlet where they established a small farm. The land was known as Howard Point, and is so designated in the Whitham and Page map from 1890, detail above left. Over time the designation was forgotten, but historian Ed Echtle noticed the name on the map and established its connection with the Howard family. In 2018 he petitioned to have the Washington State Committee on Geographic Names to officially designate the point of land Howard Point. The petition was granted in 2019, one of the few placed in Washington State to be named after a Black family. 

For more information follow these links:

Washington State Committee on Geographic Names, petition and decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Howard Point

Howell House

Location: 413 Quince St NE
Local register

Howell House, 1939, Thurston County  Assessor, Washington State Archives Howell House today (2013), photo by Matt Kennelly

The Howell House on Quince Street is an example of one of the many unadorned, yet sturdily built homes that served working residents of Olympia in the late 19th century. It was probably built between 1888 and 1890, located on the eastern side of the Swantown Slough on the outskirts of the city. The house is on the local heritage register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Howell House

Hubbard House

Location: 119 17th Ave SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood 

Hubbard_1721_1937Hubbard House, 1937, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHubbard House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

This well-maintained early Craftsman style bungalow was built about 1910 for C.F. Hubbard, who was State Labor Commissioner. The home is on the local register and located in the South Capitol National Historic District.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Hubbard House

Huesing House/Orchard Park Plat

Location: 1923 Division St NW
Local register

huesing_1936Huesing House, 1936, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Huesing House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

In 1892 Samuel Woodruff, member of an early Thurston County family, came up with an innovative sales idea. Woodruff had already platted the Woodruff subdivision just north of Division Street on the Westside, had built the Woodruff Block downtown, and had platted and was developing the city of Gate, Washington. For his new venture, he purchased almost 200 acres of property from the pioneer Konrad Schneider family, whose holdings extended from Budd Inlet nearly all the way to Summit Lake west of Eld Inlet. The acreage was purchased at $100 an acre and Schneider held  a mortgage that specified that as each acre-sized lot was sold, it would be released from the mortgage. Woodruff then platted the subdivision and marketed it with innovative terms: first, each acre-sized lot would allow for working class families to have a small orchard, which would be planted by Woodruff as part of the deal. With that size lot they would also be able to keep a cow and plant a garden. Finally, the lots would be sold on the installment plan so that families could afford them.

A great deal of publicity accompanied the release of the lots for sale. Artist Edward Lange was commissioned to create a huge painting of Orchard Park; newspapers announced the new plat, and advertisements were put in the paper warning purchasers to come early on opening day to secure the best lots. The lots were marketed at $400, a 400% markup from the price Woodruff was paying the Schneider family.

Unfortunately for Woodruff, the 1893 Depression intervened, and only a few lots were sold. Schneider foreclosed on the unsold lots and while Woodruff fought the foreclosure, he ultimately lost and the property reverted to the Schneiders, who took over the marketing and sale of the remaining lots. Remnants of the orchards planted either by the Schneiders or Woodruff remain in the yards of the Orchard Park plat homes.

The house at 1923 Division was part of the Orchard Park plat,  built in about 1922, several years after the Schneiders reacquired the property. Huesing was a bricklayer and stonemason, which accounts for the house’s  brick construction, relatively rare in Olympia. Originally, as can be seen in the above left photograph from 1936, there was a garage entrance at a lower level. The entryway and arched windows are decorated with sandstone trim. The house is on the local register.

Sources for the history of the Orchard Park plat are from court and land records.

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Schneider and Woodruff families, see the Residents section of this website.

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Huesing House/Orchard Park Plat

Hurley House

Location: 1204 4th Ave E

hurley_1937Hurley House, 1937, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
???????????????????????????????
Hurley House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This handsome Foursquare style home was built in 1911 by Mary Hurley, a widow who moved to Olympia from Mason County after her husband died. According to the inventory sheet, it was used as a boarding house. This home has been well preserved and is now used for medical offices.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Hurley House

Hursey House

Location: 1309 Bigelow Ave NE
Local register

hursey_1939Hursey House, 1936, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
Hursey HouseHursey House today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

The Hursey House is a small but attractive bungalow in the Bigelow Highlands neighborhood. It was built in 1926 by E.W. Hursey, a local plumber who lived nearby and built other houses in the neighborhood. The Bigelow Highlands neighborhood is known for having a number of homes that were built for workers in the mills and other industry on the waterfront (see Rebecca Christie’s book, Workingman’s Hill). At one time the home was owned by the Frederickson family, who worked for Olympia Veneer and Washington Co-op Egg and Poultry, two early examples of cooperatives in Washington State. The home is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

Video about Bigelow Highlands, available for viewing on Youtube

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Hursey House

Insurance Building

Location: 302 Sid Snyder Ave SW
Washington State Capitol National Historic District 

insurance building 1920sInsurance Building, 1920s, State Library Photograph Collection, Digital Archives insurance building 2012Insurance Building today (2012) photograph by Matt Kennelly

The Insurance Building was the second to be constructed on Capitol Campus following the original Wilder and White plan, after the Temple of Justice. It was completed in 1921, and built using the same Wilkeson sandstone that was used for the Temple of Justice and several other buildings on Campus. Its exterior follows a classic Roman style, but the interior was designed to fulfill the needs of a modern office building. In the original Wilder and White plan, there was to be an identical building on the other side of the Legislative Building, on the site of the Governor’s Mansion, but this plan was never fulfilled. The building was damaged during the 1949 earthquake, but restored to its original condition.

For more information follow these links:

Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation inventory

State Capitol National Historic District

Photographs at Digital Archives: Insurance 1 (above photo); Insurance 2 (earthquake damage); Insurance 3 (1950s)

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog number in the Collections Search box: C1981.30x.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Insurance Building

Israel House

Location: 2732 Capitol Boulevard S
Local register

Israel House, 1936, Thurston County  Assessor, Washington State Archives Israel House today (2013), photo by Matt Kennelly

The George Israel House on Capitol Way is one of the largest and finest houses in Olympia. Built in about 1904, it is a well-proportioned Foursquare structure with pairs of columns and a wide porch, surrounded by extensive landscaping. George Israel was the son of pioneer Thurston County commissioner William Israel. George attended college in California and then returned to practice law here. He was one of the best-known attorneys in the Pacific Northwest, presiding over numerous criminal proceedings including 30 murder cases. The house is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more on George Israel, see the Residents section of this website.

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Israel House

Iverson House

Location: 208 West Bay Dr NW
Transportation

iverson1903Iverson House at far right, 1903, detail from Edward Lange drawing, Olympia, the Capital on Puget Sound, Washington, Library of Congress collection ???????????????????????????????Iverson House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Iverson House offers a striking example of the importance of both water and rail transportation before the advent of the automobile age. The house’s construction was begun by Frederick R. Brown in about 1900. Brown was an early pioneer who rose to become president of the Olympia & Tenino Railroad, which first brought rail service to Olympia. He was also extensively involved in the timber business throughout Puget Sound. Brown built this home immediately to the west of the railroad’s depot in West Olympia, near the Fourth Avenue Bridge.

The small detail at above left, from Edward Lange’s large promotional print from 1903, Olympia, the Capital on Puget Sound, Washington shows the home, identifiable by its circular tower,  at grade with West Bay Drive as it existed then (the home is currently well below grade). The depot is at the left of the image, with railroad tracks running along pilings in back of Brown’s house. The Fourth Avenue Bridge, with its drawbridge, can also be seen behind the house.

Although the home was and is accessed via West Bay Drive, most of its decorative features, including a distinctive oval window with stained glass borders, a large porch with turned posts and balustrade, and a turret, are on the east side of the house, facing Budd Inlet. Brown would have had a satisfying view of his railroad — and Olympia and Mount Rainier beyond it — from the large east-facing window. Likewise, Olympia citizens, as well as visitors traveling by water or rail, had an impressive view of the home.

The home was later lived by the Iverson family, who occupied it until 1970. Oliver Iverson was a Norwegian immigrant who worked for the United States Survey and was known as a local historian. When Iverson died in 1940, he was one of the last two surviving veterans of the Civil War in Thurston County. Today, the building is home to a social service agency.

Olympia Heritage inventory

Link to Library of Congress image from which above detail was taken.

For more on Frederick R Brown, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Iverson House

Jacob Duplex

Location: 1314-1316 Conger St NW
mid-Century modern

Jacob duplex, about 1959, Thurston County Assessor jacob duplexJacob duplex today (2015), photo by Deborah Ross

When it was erected in 1959, this represented an unusual design for a duplex. As can be seen in a 2002 photograph in the original DAHP inventory, the living quarters were cantilevered over the carports underneath, with living space accessed via outdoor staircases, which still remain. The carports have recently been converted to garages, mitigating the modernistic look of the building. The building also had plywood siding, making use of an important industry in mid-Century Olympia. The building is on the local inventory, but not on the register. 

Department of Archaeology and Historic preservation inventory report

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Jacob Duplex

Jacaranda (Genoa’s) Restaurant (demolished)

Location: 1675 Marine Drive NE
mid-Century modern

Jacaranda Restaurant near opening day, 1964, photo courtesy of Washington State Historical Society  

Anthony’s Hearthfire today (2020), courtesy Anthony’s

For the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, the Douglas Fir Plywood Association created a model home called the Century 21 Plywood Home of Living Light. After the fair was over, the building was purchased and floated down Puget Sound, where it was remodeled and opened as the Jacaranda Restaurant. Perched at the northern end of the central Olympia peninsula, the restaurant had several domed rooms and outdoor seating areas overlooking the inlet. The building burned in 2002, and the site is now (2019) the home of Anthony’s Hearthfire Restaurant. 

Additional resources:

WSHS, catalog, search C1986.43.64.3.31.4.1

Vintage postcard posted on Flickr

Thurstontalk article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Jacaranda (Genoa’s) Restaurant (demolished)

James House

Location: 1303 4th Ave E

James House 1937James House, 1937, photo from Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives James House

James House today  (2010), photo by Deborah Ross

The Edwin James House was built about 1890 and is a handsome Pioneer style home that, despite having several owners over the years, has retained many of the attractive yet simple features of the original.

For more information follow these links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog number in the Collections Search box): C1964.26.4.9.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on James House

Jeffers Building

Location: 500 Washington St SE
Local, State and National Registers, Downtown National Historic District, Wohleb

jeffers thenJeffers Building around 1914, photograph by Joe Jeffers, courtesy of Washington State Historical Society jeffers nowJeffers Building today (2012), photo by Matt Kennelly

The Jeffers Building, erected in 1913 on the corner of Washington and Fifth Avenue, is one of the first, and most iconic, buildings of architect Joseph Wohleb. Wohleb brought the Mission style of architecture up from California and incorporated it into many buildings in downtown Olympia and elsewhere. But recognizing Olympia’s weather, he also incorporated the fixed awnings that still permit Olympia’s downtown shoppers to dodge the raindrops throughout many of the streets. The building was the studio of the Jeffers dynasty, consisting of Joseph and his brother H.W., and later Vibert and Wenzell Cusack Jeffers. The building is on the Local, State and National Registers of Historic Places and is also part of the Olympia Downtown National Historic District.

The building replaced an earlier wood-framed building at the same location. 

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Olympia Downtown National Historic District

Washington State Historical Society photographs (enter the following catalog number in the Collections Search box), C2010.227.7; earlier building C1949.1242.8

Looking Back feature with photo of hunters in front of earlier building

For more information on the Jeffers family, see the Residents section of this website, and the Jeffers House.

Thank you to Susan Parish for identification of the photographer for above left photograph.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Jeffers Building

Jeffers, Hugh House

Location: 218 19th St SW
South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

hughjeffers_1939Hugh Jeffers House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives ???????????????????????????????Hugh Jeffers House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

The Hugh Jeffers House is one of many in this neighborhood using the Tumwater Lumber Mills precut designs. It is in one of their pleasingly symmetrical Dutch Colonial styles, built in 1922. (see Harmon House entry for more on Tumwater Lumber Mills).  Hugh Jeffers was the brother of photographer Joseph Jeffers (see Jeffers House, Jeffers Studio). He was in the laundry business and owned and operated Capital City Laundry. He was also an avid aviator.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Jeffers, Hugh House

Jeffers, Joseph House

Location: 2109 East Bay Drive NE
Local register?, Wohleb

jeffers_houseJoseph Jeffers House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives Jeffers HouseJoseph Jeffers House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

Joseph Jeffers arrived in Olympia as an infant and took an interest in photography from a very early age. He established his own studio in 1904, and hired preeminent architect Joseph Wohleb to design a photography studio, the Jeffers Building at 4th and Washington, in Wohleb’s signature Mission style, but with a large north-facing light at the roof line. Joseph Jeffers’s home here was built in 1922, also with a Wohleb design. Unfortunately, he lived in the home only two years, dying in a mountain-climbing accident in 1924. His wife continued to live here and continued in the photography business with their son Vibert until the 1970s. The home is one of the finest on East Bay Drive, and has been listed in the local register. It is a Craftsman style building, but current owners have installed a tile roof that echoes Wohleb’s signature Mission style.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Jeffers, Joseph House

Jefferson Apartments

Location: 114-118 Jefferson St NE
National  Register, State Register, Local Register, Women’s History

Jefferson ApartmentsJefferson Apartments, 1964, Thurston County Assessor’s photograph from Southwest Regional Archives Jefferson Apartments

Jefferson Apartments today (2011), photo by Deborah Ross

The Jefferson Apartments Building (also called the Allen Hotel) was built by Pamela Case Hale, Olympia businesswoman and educator, who developed several blocks in downtown Olympia and at one time was the wealthiest citizen in Thurston County. It was built around 1891 and its outward appearance has been scrupulously maintained in its original state. It is listed in the National, State and Local registers.

The building is described as Italianate and is an unusual example of an early rowhouse design. In its early years, it housed workers at the nearby Springer and White Mill and other industrial locations along the waterfront, which was just on the other side of State Avenue.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter the following catalog number in the Collections Search box): C1964.26.4.4.4 (unscanned photo circa 1949)

For more information about Pamela Case Hale, see Residents section of this website

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Jefferson Apartments

Jewett House

Location: 205 Maple Park Ave
South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

jewett_1947Jewett House, 1947, Thurston County Assessor’s photograph from Southwest Regional Archives ???????????????????????????????Jewett House today (2015), photo by Deborah Ross

In the early part of the 20th Century, Maple Park was one of the more socially desirable locations in Olympia. Gracious and large homes flanked the park, which was planted with flowers and lovingly maintained. A bandstand hosted regular summer concerts, and a tall flagpole with a gold globe surmounting it crowned the park. The park was flanked by homes of Olympia’s wealthy citizens, including the A.D. Rogers home and the Ogden House. Unfortunately, all of the homes originally located on the north side of the street were demolished or moved in the 1950s and 1960s to make way for the expansion of Capitol Campus to the east side of Capitol Way. A few vintage houses remain on the south side, scattered among newer homes.

The Jewett House, built about 1910, is described as a Chalet-bungalow style house. It is basically a classic bungalow turned sideways to the street with a decorative balcony added at the second story reminiscent of a Swiss chalet. The Jewett household, consisting of widowed Florence and her stenographer daughter Margaret, lived in this home beginning about 1911. The home is in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood and is inventoried, but not on the local register, although it is very well preserved.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Jewett House

Johnson Building

Location: 700 4th Ave E

johnsonbuilding_1965Johnson Building 1965, Thurston County Assessor’s photograph from Southwest Regional Archives ???????????????????????????????Johnson Building today (2015), photo by Deborah Ross

The Johnson Building was erected some time between 1920 and 1923 and operated as a commercial structure with apartments at the upper story. It is inventoried, but not on the local register, although it is very well preserved. For many years it was owned by A.G. Johnson who had an electrical appliance and service operation here.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Johnson Building

Jones House

Location: 915 Legion Way SE
Local register

Jones House, 1939, Thurston County  Assessor, Washington State Archives Jones House now (2013), photo by Deb Ross

This well-preserved Pioneer style home was likely built before 1890, the home of Mark Jones, who was an early Thurston County pioneer, and a gardener. The Sanborn insurance maps for 1908 show greenhouses on the site. Jones’s sons George and Mark Jr. also lived in the home as adults. Other children included John Jones, a blacksmith and master mariner; and Eugenia, their unmarried daughter. George Jones was a tinsmith in Olympia, and possibly a city councilor (see Grainger Stable for photograph that includes Jones’s shop). At the time the house was built, the Jones family would have had to cross the rickety Swantown bridge to get to Olympia. It was built around the time that this part of Olympia was getting developed, but was also severely affected by the Panic of 1893. The home is on the local register.

Thank you to owner Jeremy Wilson for updated information about the home. 

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Jones family, see the Residents feature of this website.

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Jones House

Kaler house

Location: 909 Glass Ave NE
Local Register

Kaler House 1939Kaler House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor’s photograph from Southwest Regional Archives Kaler House

Kaler House today (2011), photo by Deborah Ross

The Kaler House is listed as being built about 1905 for grocer Cyrus Kaler, although historian Adah Dye believed it to be somewhat older. It is an example of a well-preserved “pioneer style” home in which the residents used a fairly basic frame and embellished it with Victorian style scrollwork, brackets, balustrades, and a variety of shingle styles. These were made possible by the existence of shingle mills with the equipment necessary to create artistic effects for more modest homes like these. The effect is comfort without ostentation. This home is listed on the local register. It is just across the street from the Bigelow House.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter the following catalog number in Collections Search box): C1964.26.4.5.3 (unscanned photo circa 1939)

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kaler house

Kearney House/YWCA

Location: 220 Union Ave SE
Local register, Women’s History, Religious Institutions

YWCA (Kearney House) 1961, courtesy Washington State Historical Society Kearney House now, photo by YWCA of Olympia

This fine Foursquare style home is one of several that graced Union Avenue in the early 20th century. Built in 1907, it was owned by the Kearney family, who operated a local grocery store. In 1948, the home was acquired by a local branch of the Young Women’s Christian Associaton (YWCA), spearheaded by Mildred Lemon, a member of the prominent Lemon family. The house is important for its contribution to women’s history of Olympia as well as its fine construction and preservation. It is on the local register and listed as a contributing structure in the National Women’s History of Olympia register.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog number in Collections Search box), C1986.43.61.1.26.1.13

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Kearney House/YWCA

Kelley Building

Location: 501 4th Ave E
Local register

Kelley_1964Kelley Building, 1964, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives  Kelley Building

Kelley Building today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

The Kelley building was erected in 1923 and remains one of the largest commercial buildings in downtown Olympia. John Kelley established his furniture store in here 1904 on the then-Swantown Slough waterfront at Fourth and Cherry, then moved to the Hale Block, where, confusingly, there is still a sidewalk inscribed J.E. Kelley. The current building is just across the street from the Hale Block. It has been nicely preserved and is on the local register.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kelley Building

Kelly House

Location: 430 Percival St NW
Local register

Kelly House_1939Kelly House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives ???????????????????????????????Kelly House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Kelly House is one of several homes on Percival and nearby streets in the northwest neighborhood  that were built about the same time by Tumwater Lumber Mills (TLM). TLM was founded by the Andersen brothers and provided precut homes that could be ordered from a catalogue. The company was widely successful, providing materials for hundreds of homes in Olympia alone. For more information on this company, see the listing for the Harmon House, or the DAHP listing linked below. This house is on the local register. Note its striking similarity to the Winters House, just a block away, as well as the way decorative features made each of these homes unique.  The house was built about 1932. James Kelly worked for the Department of Education.

The home is near, but not in, the Rogers Street Local Historical District, which showcases Tumwater Lumber Mills homes. 

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Kelly House

Kent, Earl and Adele complex

Location: 2155 East Bay Drive NE
mid-Century modern

kent_1946Earl and Adele Kent complex, 1946, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives Earl and adele kentEarl and Adele Kent complex today (2015), photo by Deborah Ross

The Earl and Adele Kent complex, built around 1945, consists of two houses and extensive landscaping on the east side of Budd Inlet. Originally there was a one-story brick house here, and the Kents (owners of Olympic Ice Cream) added another home, also one story, in a contemporary design. The second story of the main house, shown here, was added in 1999. The buildings have undergone extensive changes and are inventoried but not on the local register.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kent, Earl and Adele complex

Kevin House

Location: 2009 Columbia St SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

kevinhouse_1939Kevin House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
Kevin HouseKevin House today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

The Mission style Kevin House was built in 1928, the same year as the nearby Kevin-Cammarano house. Like that house, it was built by Copeland Lumber Company. The small cottage was built for the Kevins’ daughter. It is on the local register and located in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kevin House

Kevin/Cammarano House

Location: 203 20th Ave SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

kevin-cammarano_1939 Kevin/Cammarano House (1938), Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
Kevin-Cammarano HouseKevin/Cammarano House today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

This substantial Spanish colonial-style house was built in 1928 by Copeland Lumber Company for the Kevin family. Edward Kevin was a superintendent for the Port Townsend Southern Railway Company and his wife Victoria was a music teacher. The house is on the local register and is in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kevin/Cammarano House

KGY Building

Location: 1700 Marine Drive NE
mid-Century modern; Wohleb

KGYKGY Building, 1960s, KGY Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAKGY Building today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The KGY Building is one of the city’s most distinctive mid-Century modern buildings. The radio station is one of the oldest in the United States, licensed in 1916. It was originally run by Father Sebastian Ruth, and located on the campus of St. Martin’s College in Lacey. It then moved to the Capitol Park (“1063”) building at 11th and Capitol, and then to the Rockway-Leland Building in 1941. Eventually it outgrew this location, and in 1960 architect Stacey Bennett, a member of Robert Wohleb and Associates, was hired to design an “ultra-modern” building over the water at the far northern tip of Olympia’s central peninsula.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory (includes an excellent and comprehensive history of the radio station)

 mid-Century Modern Walking Tour

Looking Back feature: Dick Nichols welcomed to KGY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on KGY Building

Kincy Hardware

Location: 512 4th Ave E

Kincy Hardware building after the 1949 earthquake, William P. Conser photograph, courtesy of Washington State Historical Society Kincy Hardware building today (2013), photo by Matt Kennelly

The Kincy Hardware building was erected in 1919 and operated as a hardware store by Oscar Kincy starting in 1922. It has changed very little in appearance over the years. During the 1949 earthquake, its glass windows were shattered, shown in the photograph at above left.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington State Historical Society (above photograph, enter the following catalog number in Collection Search box), 2013.23.5

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kincy Hardware

Klaumbush House

Location: 101 Olympic Way SW
Local register

klaumbush_1938Klaumbush House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAKlaumbush House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

This well-maintained early Craftsman style home was built about 1911 for William and Avis Klaumbush. Klaumbush owned a barbershop in the city. The home is a prominent landmark upland from the Fourth Avenue bridge in West Olympia. It is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Klaumbush House

Knox Apartments site/Warbass home site

Location: 166 Washington St NE

 

knox hotelKnox Hotel and Apartments, 1914, photo by Robert Esterly, courtesy of Washington State Historical Society Knox site parking lot

Location today (2012), photo by Deb Ross

Another example of a downtown building razed to create a parking lot, this is the location of the former Knox Hotel and Apartments. An earlier building was erected at this site between 1891 and 1896 by John D. Knox. By 1900, Mr. Knox had died and his wife Clara took over management. This building was erected in the early 20th century. It lasted well into the twentieth century and was a convenient location to the core of downtown Olympia, including the courthouse next door. The 1910 US Census shows an interesting variety of residents, including teachers, actors, stenographers, and Ed Zabel, manager of the Zabel theater chain downtown.

Before the Knox Hotel was built, this was the location of the home of Dr. Uzal Warbass and family. A photograph of that home is linked below (note the cupola-ed  Columbia Hall in the background)

Additional resources:

Washington State Historical Society photographs (enter the following catalog number into Collections Search box), 2010.149.32.1

Digital Archives photograph of Warbass home

For more information on the Knox and Warbass families, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Knox Apartments site/Warbass home site

Kornmesser House

Location: 407 Olympic Way SW
Women’s History

kornmesser_1966Kornmesser House 1966, Southwest Regional Archives, Thurston County Assessor
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAKornmesser House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

The Kornmesser Home sits on the corner of Olympic Way and Fourth Avenue just west of the Fourth Avenue bridge and is a prominent landmark. It was built in 1940 to a design by local architect Phyllis Dohm Mueller, whose family home, the Dohm House, was just to the south of here. Its mock-Tudor style is unusual for Olympia.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kornmesser House

Kuhns House

Location: 1102 Legion Way SE

kuhnsKuhns House 1970, Southwest Regional Archives, Thurston County Assessor
kuhns
Kuhns House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

This distinctive house at the corner of Eastside Street and Legion Way was erected in 1931 by Guy Kuhns, who was a local contractor. It is an attractive one story bungalow with unusually long sides and decorative features.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Kuhns House

Laberee House

Location: 1910 Water St SW
Local register, South Capitol National District

No vintage scanned image is available. If you have one, or would like to sponsor the scanning of the image linked below, please contact us. Laberee House

Laberee House today (2012), photograph by Deb Ross

The Laberee House was built about 1923 by Rose Laberee, widow of Oscar Laberee, Quebec-born millionaire, who lived in Spokane. Mrs. Laberee was a member of the pioneer Clark family, and after her husband’s death, came to live in Olympia with her daughter Gladys Kelly. Her cousin-in-law was the owner of Laberee’s Livery business in Olympia.  The house is built in the popular Colonial Revival style with symmetrical features and columns framing a central doorway. It was occupied by several state employees and restored by the Carrell family. It is on the local register, as well as being located in the South Capital National Historic District.

Additional resources:

Washington  State Historical Society (enter the following catalog number in the Collections Search box): C1950.1301.22.2

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood Historic District

For more information on the Laberees and Clarks, see the Residents section of this website

Thank you to Rose Laberee’s descendant, Sally Mantz, for information about the Laberee and Clark family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Laberee House

Lackey Duplex

Location: 2711 Adams St SE
Women’s History; Wohleb

lackey_1947Lackey Duplex, 1947, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives Lackey duplexLackey Duplex today (2015), photo by Deborah Ross

In the early 1940s, Lillian Lackey, widow of Major John O. Lackey, platted the small Lackey Plat between Capitol Boulevard, 27th Avenue, and Adams Street. She built this duplex in 1945 at the corner of Capitol Boulevard and Adams Street and lived on one side of it. Nearby are the four homes built by Trena Belsito (later Worthington) (see, e.g., Belsito -27th Ave). This house is similar in style to Mrs. Belsito’s homes: a nod towards French eclectic with modern elements. According to its owner, it is a Joseph Wohleb design. The home is on the historic inventory but not the local register.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lackey Duplex

Lane House (Seven Gables)

Location: 1205 West Bay Drive NW
State Register

Lane 1939Lane House, 1939, photo from Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives Lane House

Lane House today  (2010), photo by Deborah Ross

The George B. Lane House was built in 1891 and is termed a Gothic Revival style due to its steeply pitched roof and decorations, though it has elements of Queen Anne style and the Gothic Revival would have been considered old fashioned when the house was built in 1891. It was one of the homesites developed by Samuel Woodruff. The house is also known as Seven Gables by previous owners, as it does indeed have seven large gables. It is perched on a hillside in West Olympia and has a view of Mount Rainier and downtown Olympia. It is on the state, but not the local, register. George Lane was a mayor of Olympia. The house has been used as a halfway house for alcoholics and as a restaurant in its long history. 

For more information follow these links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog numbers in Collections Search box): C1964.26.4.9.5; C1986.43.67.0.10 (use as halfway house)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lane House (Seven Gables)

Lassen House

Location: 424 Rogers St NW
local register, Rogers Street Historic District

lassen_1937Lassen House, 1937, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALassen House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Lassen House is one of five homes on Rogers Street Northwest that were built about the same time by Tumwater Lumber Mills (TLM). TLM was founded by the Anderson brothers and provided precut homes that could be ordered from a catalogue. The company was widely successful, providing materials for hundreds of homes in Olympia alone. For more information on this company, see the listing for the Harmon House, or the inventory listing linked below. This house is well maintained and is on the local register in its own right, as well as being located in the Rogers Street Local Historic District, which was created to showcase the unique contributions of TLM to Olympia’s architectural history. The house was built about 1930 and first owned by Irving Lassen. Lassen co-owned the Bergstrom sport shop on Fourth Avenue and later went into the electrical contracting business, Lassen Electric, which is still in business. Lassen also endowed the Lassen Foundation which provides financial assistance to Thurston County’s needy citizens.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Rogers Street Historic District

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Lassen House

La Villa – Meeker Mansion

Location: 1010 Rogers St SW
Local Register

 la villa_1937La Villa-Meeker House, 1937, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
La Villa-Meeker House today (2014), photograph by Deb Ross

Erected between 1930 and 1935, La Villa-Meeker House is one of the most unusual and elaborate homes in Olympia. It is on the local register. Its designer and owner, Ernest Meeker (see also Meeker House), was a builder, and the house reflects his personality, with many unusual features, including its construction out of different kinds of stones, even including petrified wood. It is situated on a very large landscaped lot overlooking Capitol Lake. The home is on the local register and has maintained virtually all of its original features.

Many thanks to owner Angela Bowen for access to the home and additional information about it. 

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on La Villa – Meeker Mansion

Lea House

Location: 403 Maple Park Ave SE
South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 lea_1939Lea House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
???????????????????????????????
Lea House today (2014), photograph by Deb Ross

In the early part of the 20th Century, Maple Park was one of the more socially desirable locations in Olympia. Gracious and large homes flanked the park, which was planted with flowers and lovingly maintained. A bandstand hosted regular summer concerts, and a tall flagpole with a gold globe surmounting it crowned the park. The park was flanked by homes of Olympia’s wealthy citizens, including the A.D. Rogers home and the Ogden House. Unfortunately, most of the homes originally located here were demolished or moved to make way for the expansion of Capitol Campus to the east side of Capitol Way. The Lea House is described as a Chalet-Craftsman style house. Built in 1908, in the early years of the automotive era, it has a garage at ground level and an elevated entryway. As shown in the photograph at above left, it appears that the entryway was originally  reachable by a drive, but is now served by a stairway. Additional modifications include the covered entryway that eliminated the Craftsman-style exposed beams. W.F. Lea was a lumber and shingle man in Tumwater. The home is in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood and is inventoried, but not on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lea House

Lee, Elizabeth and Ralph House

Location: 118 19th Ave SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

Elizabeth and Ralph Lee House, ca. 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives Elizabeth and Ralph Lee House today (2018), photo by City of Olympia

This Dutch Colonial style home was built some time between 1909 and 1924 in the South Capitol Neighborhood. It is on the local register. 

Register application

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Lee, Elizabeth and Ralph House

Legion Way trees

Location: Legion Way between Plum and Central
Local registered site

Legion Way trees 1930s detailTree in front of Washington School, probably 1930s, detail from Merle Junk photograph, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALegion Way trees today (2013), photograph by Deborah Ross

The sweet gum and oak trees lining Legion Way between Plum and Central streets were planted in 1928, in honor of Olympia’s war dead, and as a beautification project. Funds were raised from civic organizations to enable the project. The first trees were planted on November 11, 1928, Veteran’s Day. Various sections of the project honor the fallen from the Civil War, Spanish-American War, and World War I. Over the years, the trees formed a canopy over Legion Way, the only such ceremonial canopy in central Olympia. Unfortunately, the trees were improperly maintained over the years and a number have had to be removed. On November 11, 2010, the city once again sponsored a tree planting effort, which was attended by notable officials as well as a descendant of one of the 1928 sponsors. The avenue is on the local register as an historic site.

Further information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Legion Way trees

Leitgeb Weeping Cherry – removed

Location: 1021 8th Ave SE
City of Olympia landmark tree

Leitgeb 1950sThe Leitgeb children in front of the tree, 1955, courtesy of the Leitgeb family
leitgeb tree
Leitgeb tree 2008, photograph copyright Robert Whitlock used by permission

The weeping cherry tree (prunus suphirtella) at the corner of 8th Avenue and Eastside street in east Olympia was a well known and beloved landmark for eastside residents and workers. According to historians, the tree was planted in 1924 by the then-resident Johnson family. For many years the Leitgeb family that later lived at this location lovingly maintained it, and it continued to be maintained after the demolition of their home and construction of a modern office building on the location. The plaque at the foot of the tree, shown at above right, is a testament to the care and love that the Leitgebs bestowed not only on the tree but on their family, who still live in the area. The tree was a designated Olympia Heritage Tree. Unfortunately it had to be removed in 2016. 

Thank you to the Leitgeb family for their assistance

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Leitgeb Weeping Cherry – removed

Le May House

Location: 434 Percival St NW
Local register

le may 1939Le May House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Le May House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Le May House, built in 1932, is one of several Tudor style homes built in this neighborhood by Tumwater Lumber Mills. TLM provided kit-built homes to owners throughout the northwest, with hundreds in Olympia alone (see Harmon House for more links to TLM history). This home is somewhat unusual in having a stucco facade. It is well maintained and on the local register. The Le May family owned meat markets on Fourth Avenue and in downtown Olympia at 1023 Capitol Way, an inventoried property (currently occupied by the Subway franchise). See also the Le May/Hedges House and Le May/Leonardson House

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Le May House

Le May/Hedges House

Location: 603 Governor Stevens Ave SE

lemay-hedges_1937Le May/Hedges House, 1937, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
lemay-hedges
Le May/Hedges House today (2015), photo by Shanna Stevenson

Ernest and Mildred Le May built this Minimal Traditional style house in 1937 and sold it in 1939 to Thomas and Annie Hedges, who owned the home for many years.  Thomas Hedges was a State Tax Commissioner. The Le May family owned meat markets on Fourth Avenue and in downtown Olympia at 1023 Capitol Way, an inventoried property (currently occupied by the Subway franchise). They also lived in the Le May House before moving here.

Olympia Heritage Commission inventory report

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Le May/Hedges House

Le May/Leonardson House

Location: 822 Governor Stevens Ave SE

lemay-leonardson_1940 Le May/Leonardson House, 1940, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
lemay governor stevens now
Le May/Hedges House today (2015), photo by Shanna Stevenson

The Le May/Leonardson House, built in 1940, is the third in a series of homes built by Ernest and Mildred Le May (see Le May House in West Olympia and Le May/Hedges House nearby on Governor Stevens). The house is a Minimal Traditional Style with Colonial Revival detailing built in brick with signature detailing of the period.   Other owners of the house include Helen Marie and Carl Leonardson, who was a manager for Georgia Pacific.

The Le May family owned meat markets on Fourth Avenue and in downtown Olympia at 1023 Capitol Way, an inventoried property (currently occupied by the Subway franchise). They also had a meat market in the Wildwood Shopping Center

Olympia Heritage Commission inventory sheet

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Le May/Leonardson House

Le May Meat Market Building – Capitol Way

Location: 1023 Capitol Way S

Le May Meat Market, around 1940, Southwest Regional Archives Daughters of the Pioneers collection Le May building

Le May Meat Market building today,  photograph by Deborah Ross (2015)

In the days before the advent of supermarkets, small groceries were much more prevalent and scattered throughout the city. The Le May Meat Market building currently at this location was erected in 1936. By then, Capitol Way had turned largely commercial, with the designation of Route 99 bringing increasing traffic through town. The building’s distinctive art deco style, with its stepped parapet, earned it a place on the city’s inventory. Another Le May market was also located on Route 99 as it turned north onto Fourth Avenue (see also Le May House and Le May Market on Fourth Avenue).

Additional resources:

Inventory sheet 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Le May Meat Market Building – Capitol Way

Les Schwab Building (demolished)/site of P.J. O’Brien’s Blacksmith

Location: 217 Columbia St NW
Transportation; Diversity: Native American history

o'brien shopP.J. O’Brien Blacksmith Shop around 1900, photograph courtesy of Washington State Historical Society les_schwabCanoe Journey Mural on side of Les Schwab building (2012), Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

Even before the 1911 Carlyon Fill project, the Port area north of State Avenue started evolving into an area of light and heavy industrial activity, as well as a zone for less genteel businesses such as brothels and saloons (see also Dead Zone). P.J. O’Brien’s Blacksmith shop, adjacent to Percival Landing and on the north side of State Avenue, was an example of the former, as was a recent occupant of this location, Les Schwab tires (now demolished). For a time this site was also the home of the Columbia Furniture Company, and a Coca Cola Bottling Warehouse. The Les Schwab building was erected in 1941. The Port area is gradually returning to an area of mixed use, including commercial businesses, residents, and industrial activity.

In 2012, the Olympia Downtown Association and the Olympia Heritage Commission commissioned a mural, pictured above, painted on the side of the Les Schwab building to commemorate the Canoe Journey Paddle to Squaxin event that occurred that year. The mural was demolished along with the Les Schwab building. 

The site is currently occupied by an apartment building structure that honors an early resident, Lurana Ware Percival. 

Links to more information:

Washington State Historical Society (enter the catalog numbers in Collections Search box): C1956.20.5 (above photo); C1964.26.4.22.8

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Les Schwab Building (demolished)/site of P.J. O’Brien’s Blacksmith

Lewis, H.L. House

Location: 2405 Old Oregon Trail SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood 

HLLewis_1739_1938H.L. Lewis House, 1938, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAH.L. Lewis House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

One of the earlier examples of a Craftsman style bungalow, the H.L. Lewis house was built in 1911 at the far southern end of the South Capitol Neighborhood, and is an excellent example of that style. Harry Lewis was an editor of the Daily Olympian as well as Thurston County auditor. The home is on the local register.

The name of this street, Old Oregon Trail, reflects its original status as one of the last segments of the Oregon Trail after it crossed the Deschutes River at Tumwater and proceeded along the top of the slope leading down to the center of Olympia, where a marker at Sylvester Park notes the terminus of this leg of the trail. The street is now tucked away behind the much more heavily traveled Capitol Boulevard.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lewis, H.L. House

Liberty Cafe building/William J. Yeager homesite

Location: 212 4th Ave E
Downtown National Historic District

yeager saloonFourth Avenue looking west, Yeager Home on right, about 1874, left side of a stereograph, courtesy Washington State Historical Society
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALiberty Cafe Building today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

In the early years of Olympia’s settlement, residences and commercial buildings freely mingled downtown. Shown at above left, in an early photograph, is a view of Fourth Avenue, looking west. As is the case today, Fourth Avenue was one of the two most important streets in post-Civil War era Olympia. One of the homes on the right (north) side of the street was William J. Yeager’s. The Yeagers arrived here from Indiana probably in the early 1860s and set up as a photographer, as well as a drayman, or hauler. His descendants include prominent Olympia citizens William H. Yeager and his son, William H., Jr., and Ida Yeager Mossman (see also Yeager House; William H. Yeager Jr. House).

With the growth of Olympia and the location of the State Capitol downtown, commercial buildings began to overtake residences in the downtown core. The building currently at this site was erected in 1932, and remodeled in 1950. It was owned by the Wisniewski family, who operated the Liberty Cafe here (see also Wisniewski House). The building is in the Downtown National Historic District and listed as Historic Contributing.

Links:

Olympia Downtown National Historic District

Olympia Heritage inventory (Liberty  Cafe)

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog number in the Collections Search box), C1959.8.4

For more information on the Yeager family, see the Residents section of the website

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Liberty Cafe building/William J. Yeager homesite

Lilly House

Location: 918 San Francisco St NE
Local register

Lilly_1939Lilly House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
Lilly HouseLilly House today (2013) photo by Deb Ross

At the crest of San Francisco Street, in east Olympia, the Lilly House would have had a nice view of the foot of Budd Bay when it was built, some time between 1895 and 1910. The Lillys bought the property from Clara Knox, the widowed proprietor of the Knox Apartments. Sources differ on whether the house had already been built when they moved here. Warren Lilly, a carpenter, and his wife Helen Josephine Lilly were living in Gull Harbor in 1900, along with other Lilly family members (Lilly Road is likely named after the family). They had moved to this slightly more convenient location by 1910. At that time, however, travel to downtown Olympia would have entailed a muddy, slippery ride or walk down to the waterfront, and then a rickety bridge crossing over the Swantown Slough.

The house is a modest but charming pioneer style home in good condition. It is listed on the local register.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Thank you to owner Kristina Hermach for information about the house and its former occupants. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lilly House

Lincoln School

Location: 213 21st Ave SE
Local register; South Capitol National Historic District; Wohleb; Women’s History; Schools

Lincoln school SusanParishPhotoCollections_AR-20090812-ph00199Lincoln School, 1925-1935, State Archives, Susan Parish Collection Lincoln SchoolLincoln School today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

The Lincoln School building was constructed in 1925 with the Mission style characteristic of prominent Olympia architect Joseph Wohleb, who was the Olympia School District’s official architect at the time. The building replaced an earlier structure at a location a few blocks to the north of here, also called Lincoln School. It is a large, handsome stucco building with stylish ornamentation at roofline and throughout. The building was renovated in 1995 but retains its original features and is on the local register. It is still used as an elementary school.

The building is significant to women’s history of Olympia as the majority of its teachers and, more recently, its principals, were women, some of whom also played prominent roles in Olympia society.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lincoln School

Lo Ma Villa (Muench House)

Location: 2621 Capitol Way S
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood; Women’s History

lo ma_1939Lo Ma Villa 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALo Ma Villa today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

Lo Ma Villa, built in 1921, was undoubtedly named after the first letters of its owners, Louis and Marie Muench. The design is by architect Elizabeth Ayer, the first female graduate of the University of Washington School of Architecture. Ayer is noted for her elegant, spacious homes both here and in the Puget Sound area, often on an English Revival or French Eclectic style (see Westhillsyde and Bridges House). This home, like those, was built overlooking the Deschutes Estuary. It also would have had a view of the Olympia Brewery and over to the Schmidt Mansion, owned by the Muenches’ daughter Clara and her husband, Peter G. Schmidt. The home had extensive landscaping, including a waterfall.

Louis Muench was an industrialist who spent most of his working life in the eastern United States. Clara married Peter G. Schmidt in the early 20th century, and the Muenches were frequent visitors. In 1920, Louis and Marie, already in their 60s, and their remaining children, moved to the Olympia area, spending the first year or two living with the Schmidts, and then erecting Lo Ma Villa. Muench wasted no time on his arrival establishing himself  as an important contributor to the state’s economic, financial and manufacturing environment. Deploring the waste from lumber mills, he founded the pulp industry in Washington state in Anacortes in 1925. He was a popular speaker on industry and economics both before and after his arrival in Olympia. The Muench genes produced prodigious number of daughters, with Louis and Marie’s 5 girls and Clara and Peter Schmidt’s 4.

For a time Lo Ma Villa was owned by Olympia city council member, Mary Lux. It is on the local register and at the very southern end of the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lo Ma Villa (Muench House)

Lord Mansion (formerly site of State Capital Museum)

Location: 211 21st Ave SW
National, State and Local registers; South Capitol National Historic District; Wohleb; Women’s History

capitalmuseum_1938Lord Mansion 1938, Thurston County  Assessor, Washington State Archives
C J Lord Mansion

Lord Mansion today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

Clarence Lord was one of the most important figures in Olympia’s, and indeed the state’s, financial history. Founder of the Capital National Bank, he was also an investor in many other important commercial enterprises in this city, including the Olympia Knitting Mills and the trolley system, which brought electricity to Olympia. This mansion was built in 1923 and intended to be the most important residence in town, with the possible exception of the Governor’s Mansion (it was subsequently outshone by the nearby McCleary Mansion). It was designed by Joseph Wohleb and created Wohleb’s reputation as one of the premier architects of the northwest. Its elegant features have been retained, partly due to the efforts of Lord’s wife, Elizabeth Reynolds Lord, who donated her home to the state provided it was used for public purposes. For many years it was the location of the State Capital Museum as well as the home of the Women’s History Consortium. Its future is currently (2017) uncertain. Elizabeth Lord was a prominent member of Olympia society, active in the Red Cross and the DAR, as well as being very interested in local history and culture. The building is on the national, state, and local heritage registers.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

City of Olympia Women’s History Walking Tour

Looking Back article

The Washington State Historical Society catalog has many photographs and other items relating to the State Capital Museum. Enter search terms at their on-line catalog here to be taken to listings. 

For more on CJ Lord and Elizabeth Reynolds Lord, see the Residents section of this website (L and R)

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lord Mansion (formerly site of State Capital Museum)

Lowry House

Location: 1627 Dickinson St NW

Lowry_1937Lowry House, 1937, Thurston County  Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Lowry House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Lowry House was constructed in about 1890. At the time, it was located in a remote area of West Olympia, before its rapid expansion in the early 1890s resulting from the establishment of the Woodruff and other large plats that stretched along the hillside above Budd Inlet. As can be seen in the photograph at above left from 1937, this area of town was still quite rural at that time, and even now is surrounded by undeveloped woodlands. The home is a well preserved example of the Queen Anne style, making use of fanciful decorative features such as shingling, banding, and brackets.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lowry House

Lucas House

Location: 420 Carlyon St SE
Local register

Lucas House, 1953, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives Lucas House today (2018), photo by City of Olympia

This home in the Carlyon neighborhood is a well-preserved example of a Tudor Revival cottage, common to the area. The home was built in 1926; it is well maintained and on the local register. The first owner, Howard Lucas, was a director of Capital National Bank. 

Additional resources:

Register application

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Lucas House

Luepke/Talcott House

Location: 222 19th Ave SW
Local Register, South Capitol National Historic District

Talcott House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives Talcott House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

This handsome house was built some time between 1907 and 1915 by R.H. Luepke, who worked at the Olympia Brewing Company, but was later owned by two generations of the Talcott family (George Noyes, Jr. and Richard Talcott). The Talcotts were an early pioneer merchant family (see the Talcott Jewelry store , Talcott Commercial Building, and Talcott Apartments ). George Noyes Sr. and Addie Chambers Talcott lived around the corner in the more modest George and Addie Talcott House. This home is on the local register and also in the South Capitol National Historic District where it has a distinguished place as one of the finer examples of Foursquare style in the neighborhood.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District listing

For more on the Talcott family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Luepke/Talcott House

Lybarger House

Location: 1056 Boundary St SE
Local register

lybarger Lybarger House, 1973, courtesy of Mark Foutch Lybarger House

Lybarger House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

The Lybarger House was built about 1887 on the east side of Olympia, on the other side of the Swantown Bridge from downtown. John G. Lybarger was a lumberman, but also, for a few years, an investor, buying several blocks of land in partnership with John L. Henderson, a professor at Olympia Collegiate Institute. Lybarger and his wife Lura Mix Lybarger raised three children in this house. In only a few years, however, legal, financial and personal difficulties forced him to sell the home to his partner’s mother, Catherine Henderson. The house changed hands many times and by 1973, when the above photo at left was taken, it was in seriously deteriorated condition. The Bobbitt family bought and began its restoration; in the mid-1980s, Olympia Mayor Mark Foutch and his wife purchased the house and completed the restoration. Mayor Foutch notes that the house therefore belonged to two Olympia City Council members, as Lybarger served on the City Council around the time the house was built.

The house is built in the Italianate style. At the time it was built, it would have had a nice view of the Swantown Slough and downtown Olympia. Although it doesn’t have extensive decorative features, the paired brackets at the eaves add an elegant touch. The house is on the local register.

Thank you to Mark Foutch and Janet Charles for additional information and photograph

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Lybarger and Henderson families, see the Residents section of this website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Lybarger House

Mallery House

Location: 320 17th Ave SE
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

mallery_1939Mallery House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
Mallery HouseMallery House today (2013) photo by Deb Ross

Naming a house has no set protocol. Sometimes it is named after the first occupant, sometimes the longest, and sometimes the most prominent. The latter reason appears to have won out in the case of the Mallery House (not to be confused with the Mallory House). Built by streetcar conductor William Morford, it was occupied by Bing Crosby’s maternal uncle George Harrigan and then by State Supreme Court Justice Joseph Mallery from the 1920s to 1940s.

Built about 1909, the Mallery House is in the Foursquare style typical of many other homes in this area. However, it is unusual in being faced with stucco and having rounded porch pillars and supports, reflecting the transition to the Craftsman style that became more prevalent in the neighborhood later on. The house is on the local register and in the South Capitol National Historic District.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

For more information about Judge Mallery, see the Residents feature of our website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mallery House

Mallory House

Location: 1418 Oak Ave NE
Local Register

Mallory House_1939Mallory House in 1939, photo from Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives Mallory House

Mallory House today (2010), photo by Deb Ross

This pleasing 1895 Queen Anne-style cottage was built by Henry Mallory, who began his career as a a machinist at the Springer and White mill and rose to become the owner of its successor company, the East Side Lumber Company. He was one of the more prominent businessmen and developers in the city. The home is on the Pamela Hale plat in the Bigelow area of Swantown (east Olympia) and is a fine example of the smaller cottages built in the neighborhood around that time. It has been recently restored and added to the local register of historic buildings.

For more information follow these links:

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog number in Collections Search box): C1964.26.4.16.7

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mallory House

Manier House

Location: 1121 5th Ave SE
Local register; Women’s History

manier_1939Manier House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAManier House today (2013) photo by Deb Ross

This imposing Foursquare style home is unusual for its size in its Eastside neighborhood. It was built in about 1909 and was sold in 1915 to William Wesley Manier and his wife Gertrude Davis Manier. Mr. Manier was a young associate of Daniel Bigelow, who lived not far away (see Bigelow House). The Maniers were a prominent family, active in business and social affairs. Gertrude was at one time president of the Woman’s Club. By the time the Maniers moved here, the Carlyon Fill had been completed, making travel to downtown Olympia and the courts much easier.

The home is listed on the local register.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Manier family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Manier House

Mann’s Seeds Building/Rainy Day Records

Location: 301 5th Ave E
Popular culture

mannsseeds_1964Mann’s Seeds Building, 1964, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMann’s Seeds Building today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The utilitarian structure at the corner of Franklin and Fifth was built in 1945 and housed Mann’s Seeds. According to historian Bernice Sapp, this was the location of the home of Champion Bramwell (CB) Mann. CB Mann ran a pharmacy in the Turner Block building, was from an early pioneer family, and acted as territorial librarian for a time. His most significant contribution to us, however, was the initiative he took in the early 20th century to locate and survey Thurston County’s original pioneer families, recording how they arrived here, who they came with, where they settled, and other information. This material is now on line as the Thurston County Pioneers Project.

The building now houses a popular and long-standing record store business. The building has not been inventoried.

For more information on the Mann family, see the Residents section of this website. 

Additional resources:

Sapp, Olympia 100 Years ago

Looking Back image and article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Mann’s Seeds Building/Rainy Day Records

Manschreck House

Location: 3132 Lorne St SE
local register

manschreck_1939Manschreck House, 1936, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAManschreck House today (2013), Photo by Deb Ross

The Manschreck home was built in 1920 by Charles Manschreck, who platted part of the Carlyon neighborhood and built several of the homes. It is an attractive bungalow, built on a double lot, with exposed beams and a port-cochere that extends over the driveway. The home is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Manschreck House

Marathon Park

Location: Deschutes Parkway
Women’s History

1984marathonStart of first women’s marathon trials, near Marathon Park, 1984, courtesy The Olympian OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMarathon Park today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

Marathon Park, first created in 1970 out of fill that extended the park into Capitol Lake, was renamed in 1984 to commemorate an historic event.

In 1981, the International Olympia Committee finally decided to introduce a women’s marathon at the upcoming 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. Major cities immediately began vying for the opportunity to host the first trials for the event. In a move reminiscent of the City’s famous campaign to become the state capital, then-Supreme Court Justice Gerry Alexander, along with Slade Gorton, traveled to Philadelphia and wooed the committee with a hospitality room filled with food and beverages from Washington State, including the eponymous Olympia beer. The city easily won out over its larger competitors. It remains the only city under 120,000 to host marathon trials for men or women.

The 1984 trials attracted thousands of participants and spectators. Joan Benoit, later Joan Benoit Samuelson, easily won the trials and went on to become the first women’s marathon winner in Olympic history.

Although Marathon Park is named for that historic event, the trials actually began ended a little south of the park at the Thurston County courthouse. The park is owned by the Department of Enterprise Services, a department of the State of Washington.

Additional resources:

DES webpage for park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Marathon Park

Martin Building/site of Doane’s Oyster House/Harned and Mabie homes

Location: 113-119 5th Ave SE
Downtown National Historical District, Wohleb design; Women’s History

doanes oysterDoane’s Oyster House around 1880, photograph from Digital Archives wind up hereMartin Building today (2012), Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

The corner of 5th and Washington was, in Olympia’s earliest years, the homes of builder Benjamin Harned and territorial librarian Jeremiah Mabie, and later the site of Doane’s Oyster House and garden. 

Captain Woodbury Doane established his oyster house in the 1870s near the waterfront; his restaurant was so popular that he moved to this premier location close to the center of political and commercial activity at the corner of 5th  Avenue and Washington Street. Here politicians, lobbyists and businessmen could gather for the signature pan-roasted oysters that were served in the “R” months, and enjoy a stroll around the backyard rose garden in the summer.

In this block also stood the Tony Faust saloon, a long-standing local watering hole.

The Martin Building, which is currently at this location, was built in 1920, and was a classic Joseph Wohleb design. (James Martin built several other buildings in downtown Olympia, including the Martin Warehouse and the Donald Building.) Notable businesses located here included the fashionable M.M. Morris ladies’ apparel store, a day care center, and a toy store. The building was damaged during the 1949 earthquake and lost some of its decorative features.

During World War I, the Minute Women operated from this location. Members distributed literature, collected funds for war bonds, and helped with the war effort on the home front.

Links to more information:

Article, Goldie Funk, Captain Doane’s Oyster Pan Roast

Digital Archives photos of Doane’s Oyster House: Oyster House 1; Oyster House 2 (above picture); MM Morris Store

Washington State Historical Society (enter catalog numbers in Collection Search box): Harned and Mabie homes, C2013.18.76, Garden of oyster house, with teacher Mary O’Brien: C1950.1325.1; C2016.0.10C1981.30x.5, 1998.81.9 (M.M. Morris store after earthquake); 2010.149.24.2

Looking Back article with image of Oyster House

(Tony  Faust Saloon in 1914); C1943.1003.14 (Doane’s)

Olympia Heritage inventory (Martin Building)

Olympia Downtown Historic District National Listing

For more information on Woodbury Doane, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Martin Building/site of Doane’s Oyster House/Harned and Mabie homes

Martin, James Warehouse

Location: 115 State Ave NE
Downtown National Historic District; Wohleb

jamesmartin_1964James Martin Warehouse, 1964, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJames Martin Warehouse today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The James Martin Warehouse was erected in 1922 with a design by Joseph Wohleb. The Martin family have owned and operated businesses in Olympia since the 1880s, and have been prominent contributors to the commercial and industrial fabric of the city (see also the Martin Building and the Donald Building, both erected by James Martin around the same time). The building has been well maintained. It is in Olympia’s Downtown National Historic District, where it is listed as Historic Contributing.

Links:

Olympia Downtown National Historic District

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Martin, James Warehouse

Martin/Tiffany House

Location: 112 18th Ave SW
Local register, South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

No vintage photograph has been located for this home. If you have one to share, please contact us.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Martin-Tiffany House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This home was built some time between about 1911 and 1926. Records show that the home was on this location in 1926, but there is family lore that it was built earlier and moved one block to this location. The home was owned by Dewey Martin, a son of James Martin, who was responsible for building many of the commercial structures downtown (see Martin Warehouse, Martin Building, Donald Building). Dewey himself was a business owner and early aviator.

This home is an attractive bungalow, and is on the local register as well as being in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Martin/Tiffany House

Masonic Temple site

Location: 105 8th Ave SE (corner 8th and Capitol)
Local Register (site)

masonic templeMasonic Temple about 1902, Image from Digital Archives thurston county titleLocation today (2012), Photo courtesy of Deb Ross

When Edmund Sylvester laid out the plans for Olympia, he set aside property for civic institutions, including two lots specifically set aside for Olympia Lodge No. 1 (formerly Lodge No. 5), which had been chartered in 1852.  The lodge originally met at Second and Main (now Olympia Ave. and Capitol Way). The building shown at above left, erected in 1855, and resembling a classic temple, lasted until 1911, when it was razed. A similar building was erected on this site but it also was razed in 1971. A plaque commemorates this site. Another plaque is located at the site of the original building on Olympia Avenue.

Further information:

Washington State Historical Society photographs (enter following catalog numbers in Collection Search box): C1952.4.52; C1961.498.22 (Fred Koepke, motorcycle policeman, in front of second temple at this site, around 1915); C1982.18.29.22 (second temple); C2017.0.111

Digital Archives photo

Bird’s Eye View of Olympia 1879, see structure marked number 5.

History of Olympia Lodge No. 1 by  George Blankenship, transcribed on this website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Masonic Temple site

Maury House

Location: 1604 Water St SW

Local register; South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

maury_1939Maury House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
Maury HouseMaury House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Maury home is a well-preserved example of one of Tumwater Lumber Mills pre-cut homes. It is in their popular English Revival style, built around 1926. For more information on the Tumwater Lumber Mills, see the Harmon House nearby. Maury was a prominent Olympia banker. The home is on the local register as well as in the South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District. 

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Maury House

McArdle House

Location: 223 19th Ave SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic District

McArdle House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives McArdle House now (2013), photo by Deb Ross

This handsome Foursquare House, with two stories of bay windows, was built around 1906. It is named after long-time residents L.D. and Fannie McArdle. L.D. was a legislator from Jefferson County who was an avid collector of historical ephemera. The house is very well preserved and is on the local register as well as located in the South Capitol National Historic District.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest, Uncategorized | Comments Off on McArdle House

McClain Motors Building/Site of Charley Vietzen home

Location: 703 4th Ave E
Transportation, Diversity: German heritage

mcclain motorsMcMahon’s Furniture Store at this site around 1965, Thurston County Assessor’s photograph from Southwest Regional Archives courtyard antiquesCourtyard Antiques mall at this location today (2012), photo by Matthew Kennelly

In early days, the Swantown Slough separated the commercial part of Fourth Avenue from the residential area to its east. Charley Vietzen, a German immigrant who ran Charlie’s Place saloon downtown, lived at the eastern edge of the slough and would have had to cross a bridge every day to go to work.

The Carlyon Fill, which eliminated the slough in 1911, coincided with the advent of the Motor Age. The building at this location was erected in 1918 for one of the first local automobile dealers. Fourth Avenue by then was the major arterial through Olympia. Fourth Avenue, coupled with State Avenue, were two of the first one-way roads in the state. In this stretch it bore the US 99 designation. Because of its connection with the advent of motorized transportation and the highway system, this building is iconic of the transition from water- to surface-based transportion in our area.

This building became a furniture store some time before the 1960s and is now an antique mall.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter following catalog number in Collections Search box): C1949.3.95 (unscanned photograph of Vietzen home)

History of Route 99, accessed May 27, 2012

For more information on the Vietzen family, see Residents section of this website

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McClain Motors Building/Site of Charley Vietzen home

McCleary, Henry House (McCleary Mansion)

Location: 111 21st Ave SW
Local register, National  Register; South Capitol National Historic District; Wohleb

mccleary_1938Henry McCleary House 1939, Thurston County  Assessor, Washington State Archives
Henry & Ada McCleary House
Henry McCleary House today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

This imposing mansion on the corner of Capitol Way and 21st Avenue is surpassed in grandeur and formality only by the Governor’s Mansion. It was built by Henry McCleary, one of Washington’s great lumber barons. The town of McCleary was named after him, for he owned and logged the area. McCleary also owned one of the largest door factories, inventing the veneer door and contributing to southeast Washington’s important veneer industry. The mansion was designed by architect Joseph Wohleb in a departure from his signature Mission style, and built between 1923 and 1925. McCleary specified that the building was to outshine the nearby Lord Mansion, which Wohleb also designed. It has exquisite details both inside and out, and is on the local and national registers and in the South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McCleary, Henry House (McCleary Mansion)

McCleary-Robinson House

Location: 101 Sherman St. NW
Local register

mcclearyrobinson_1939McCleary-Robinson House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMcCleary-Robinson House today (2013), photograph by Deb Ross

This large home, overlooking the mouth of the Deschutes Estuary and the bridges to downtown Olympia, was built in 1916 by Charles McCleary, son of lumber magnate Henry McCleary (see McCleary Mansion).  It was later occupied for many years by Supreme Court Justice John S. Robinson. Having fallen into disrepair for several years, it has recently been restored to highlight its original Craftsman style features.  The home is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McCleary-Robinson House

McClelland House

Location: 327 Sherman NW
Schools

MClelland_1939McClelland House, 1939, photo from Thurston County Assessor, State Archives McClelland House

McClelland House now (2010), photo by Deborah Ross

 

This attractive, unassuming Pioneer-style home is one of many in West Olympia built as part of the development of this part of town to serve middle class families. The land was acquired by Sam Woodruff and divided into building lots, with enough land to accommodate a small garden and a cow, which every family of the day owned. In 1893, J.R. Chaplin, a Congregational minister, had the idea of building a university in the wilderness above Butler’s Cove, and traveled to the midwest to attract settlers to this community. Several arrived here in 1894, and Chaplin arranged with Woodruff to secure what was planned as temporary home places for them in this neighborhood, possibly including this house. Chaplin also leased the Olympia Collegiate Institute building as temporary quarters for his “People’s University.” See also Chaplin House

In 1902 Benjamin McClelland was living here, listed as a teacher at the People’s University; but by 1909 he was teaching at the high school, as People’s University never realized its dream of locating at Butler’s Cove, and lasted only a few years.

Although assessor’s information shows this building as having been built in 1904, it is likely older: historian Adah Dye recorded this home as being over 50 years old in about 1949, and the McClelland family was living here in 1902.

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter the following catalog number in Collections Search box):C1964.26.4.23.7 (unscanned photo circa 1949)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McClelland House

McCoy-Trullinger House

Location: 121 19th Ave SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

mccoytrullinger_1939McCoy/Trullinger House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
McCoy/Trullinger House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This Craftsman style house was built by George and Edith McCoy about 1923. It was purchased a few years later by Rae and Truman Trullinger. Mr. Trullinger was Mayor of Olympia for several years in the 1940s.

The house is on the local register and located in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McCoy-Trullinger House

McCormick House

Location: 1702 4th Ave E
Local register

mccormick_1956McCormick House 1956, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
McCormick House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The McCormick House on busy 4th Avenue was originally constructed in 1906 in a Foursquare style. Its grounds included an orchard and livestock, and McCormick, a builder, latter platted the McCormick subdivision in this neighborhood. The building had extensive modifications in 1920 and then to its current Moderne style in the 1940s. The house is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McCormick House

McCully House

Location: 1625 Sylvester St SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood; Women’s History; Wohleb

mccully_1939McCully House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMcCully House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

Demonstrating the vast scope of his architectural repertoire, Joseph Wohleb designed this house for Merritt and Ethel McCully around 1921, shortly after their marriage. The home is an elegant Colonial Revival style, with a carport reflecting the new automotive era. It overlooks Capitol Lake, which was then the Deschutes Estuary. Mr. McCully was a reporter for the Tacoma newspaper and a statistician for the state. The home was owned by Robert (Bobby) Schmidt, president of Olympia Brewing Company, and then for a number of years by the Gadbaw family. Holly Gadbaw was a mayor of Olympia.

The home is on the local register and is in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McCully House

McDonald, W.B. House

Location: 2215 Water St SW
 South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

wbmcdonaldW.B. McDonald House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
wb mcdonald
W.B. McDonald House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

The W.B. McDonald House, erected in 1939, is an art moderne take on a Colonial theme. It was designed by Seattle architect J. Lister Holmes. McDonald owned the Avalon and Olympic Theaters.

The well-maintained home is in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage Inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McDonald, W.B. House

McElroy, H.B. Store

Location: 414 Capitol Way S
Downtown National Historic District; Wohleb

hmcelroy_1964H.B. McElroy Store Building, 1964, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAH.B. McElroy Store Building today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This building was designed by Joseph Wohleb and erected in 1926. It originally housed a tavern and stores. The building was redesigned several times, always by Wohleb. The  green and black carrara glass features were added in the 1940 remodel. They lent an Art Moderne look to the building just as this style was going into decline. Thus, this building’s current facade can be considered one of the last Moderne-style buildings in downtown Olympia before the introduction of mid-Century architecture. The building is in the Downtown National Historic District and listed as Historic Contributing.

The builder, Harry McElroy, was a member of a distinguished pioneer family. His father, Thornton McElroy, founded the area’s first newspaper, the Columbian, before Washington became a territory. The McElroy House was nearby, across from Sylvester Park.

Links:

Olympia Downtown National Historic District

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the McElroy family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McElroy, H.B. Store

McElroy, Thornton house site

Location: 702 Washington St SE

mcelroy houseThornton McElroy home around 1873, photograph courtesy of Washington State Historical Society 702 Washington702 Washington St. today, Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

Between Sylvester Park and the territorial capitol building at the current location of Capitol Campus, several prominent citizens erected stately  homes in the 1870s and 1880s. A few have survived, but for the most part they have succumbed to commercial development downtown. The Thornton McElroy home was located near Sylvester Park, across from the Old State Capitol Building (current Superintendent of Public Instruction building, although McElroy died before that building was erected). Thornton McElroy was the co-publisher of Olympia’s first newspaper, the Columbian, established before Washington became its own territory separate from Oregon. Over the years his career included Mayor of Olympia, public printer, and banker. Thornton’s son Harry McElroy occupied the home after his father’s death (see also H. McElroy Store).

This is now the site of the Centurylink parking lot.

Links to more information:

Washington State Historical Society (enter following catalog numbers in Collections Search box): C1945.20.14, C1945.20.12, C1964.26.4.1.7; C1950.1301.19.14 (photograph of Harry McElroy and Charles M. Moore in yard of home)

For more information on the McElroy family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McElroy, Thornton house site

McIntyre House

Location: 123 Cushing St. NW
Local Register

seeley mcintyreJoseph McIntyre home around 1900, photograph courtesy of Washington State Historical Society seeley mcintyre

McIntyre home today (2012), Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

The McIntyre home is one of the best preserved and restored homes in Westside Olympia. It was built by or for Joseph McIntyre, a carpenter who arrived in Olympia in around 1890. His daughter Nellie married Methodist minister Clarence Seely, a graduate of the Olympia Collegiate Institute. This home is on the local register and currently (2021) operated as a Bed &  Breakfast.

Links to more information:

Washington State Historical Society (enter the following catalog numbers in Collections Search box): 1998.113.2, 1998.113.1, C1964.26.4.3.6

Olympia Heritage inventory

Marie B&B website, accessed March 2022

For more information on the McIntyre and Seely families, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McIntyre House

McKenny, Margaret House

Location: 2201 Water St SW
Women’s History; South Capitol National Historic District

mckenny_1939Margaret McKenny House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Margaret McKenny House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This unassuming duplex bungalow  was the home of famed naturalist Margaret McKenny. She was the daughter of General Thomas I. McKenny, who served in the Civil War and later as Indian Agent in Washington Territory. General McKenny was also a businessman who built the McKenny Block on Capitol Way. General McKenny built this home for his daughter, Margaret. Miss McKenny, who never married, was a landscape architect and author of several books on nature, including a definitive tome on mushrooms. She helped to preserve many important historic and natural areas, including Sylvester Park and the Nisqually Wildlife Preserve. A campground and an elementary school are named after her. A decades-long friend and activist partner, Flo Brodie (see Brodie House), later owned this house.

The home is not on the local heritage register, but is located in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood. It was built in 1921. 

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

Women’s History Walking Tour

For more information on the McKenny family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McKenny, Margaret House

McLaughlin House

Location: 114 22nd Ave SE
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

No vintage photograph has been located; if you have one to share, please contact us
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMcLaughlin House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

The McLaughlin House is one of many Craftsman style bungalows in the historic South Capitol Neighborhood. It appears to have been built around 1915 as a rental. The McLaughlin family lived here for two decades from the 1920s to 1940s. Mr. McLaughlin was a state employee. The home is on the local register and in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McLaughlin House

McMurry House

Location: 502 Edison St SE
Local register

mcmurry_1965McMurry House 1965, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMcMurry House today (2014) Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

The McMurry House is located in a quiet residential neighborhood southeast Olympia. A good example of a modest Craftsman-style home, it was built by Frank and Lucinda McMurry in about 1922. It is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McMurry House

McNeil House

Location: 318 Rogers St NW
Rogers Street Local Historic District

mcneilMcNeil House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives mcneilMcNeil House today (2015) Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

This Tumwater Lumber Mills house appears to have been built around 1930. It is located in the Rogers Street Local Historic District, which was created to showcase the contributions of TLM’s ready-built homes to Olympia’s early 20th century building trade. The home was owned by Virgil McNeil, who ran a debt collection agency in Olympia. According to the inventory sheet, this home may have been selected as a model for the company’s popular English revival style homes.

Olympia Heritage inventory

Rogers Street Historic District

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on McNeil House

Meacham Furniture/Munro Building

Location: 119 Columbia St. NW
Downtown Olympia National Historical District; Schools

meacham betterMeacham Furniture Co. around 1880, photograph courtesy of Washington State Historical Society mekong thaiMunro Building (Mekong Thai) today (2012) Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

The Meacham Furniture Company shown above to the left was located on the west side of Columbia Street between State and Fourth; the exact address is not known. After the disastrous fire of 1882, the commercial core of downtown Olympia began using masonry or brick as the primary building material, instead of wood.The Munro Building shown above right was built in 1914. It housed a variety of stores, including a plumbing and carpentry shop. Rooms were rented on the second floor. The building is in the Downtown Olympia National Historic District.

According to historian Bernice Sapp, the Meacham Furniture building once housed a school run by Annie Stevens.

Links to more information:

Washington State Historical Society (enter following catalog number in Collections Search box): Meacham Furniture C1956.20.8 (photo above) 

Olympia Heritage inventory (Munro Building)

Olympia Downtown Historic District National Listing

Sapp, Olympia 100 Years ago

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Meacham Furniture/Munro Building

Mead House

Location: 1616 Capitol Way S
South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

mead_1939Mead House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives ???????????????????????????????Mead House today (2014) Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross

Until 1908, when the current Governor’s Mansion was built, Washington’s territorial and state governors had to find their own lodging, typically by renting a suitable home from one of Olympia’s citizens. Hence, the Gowey House, Percival Mansion, Stevens Mansion, and others have all been dubbed “governor’s mansions” over the years. (Even the Egbert-Ingham House has been called the governor’s mansion, since Governor Evans and his family lived here while the Governor’s Mansion was being renovated.)

The Mead House, a well-preserved Queen Anne style home  in the then-tony Maple Park neighborhood, is the last gubernatorial residence Washington governor before the construction of the Governor’s Mansion, in 1908. The city’s inventory does not provide a construction date nor its builder or any owners, but the house is shown elsewhere as being built in the 1890s. Governor Albert Mead and his family lived here some time during his one-term tenure in office. The chronology in the city’s inventory is confused, so it is not clear which year or years he lived here. The family, like most households here in the days before commercial dairies, maintained a cow and chickens in a shed in the back yard. During Mead’s tenure, he successfully lobbied to have a state-owned mansion built, finding it impossible to raise five children, maintain a household, pay rent, and entertain, all on a salary of $333 a month. The Governor’s Mansion was completed in 1908, but by then Mead had been defeated in the primary, so never occupied the mansion (an anecdote in the city’s inventory about the Meads refusing to live in the official mansion is probably confusing the Meads with a later governor, Lister).

The home experienced a fire in the 1980s and is now converted to apartments. However, its original Queen Anne exterior features are well maintained.

Links to more information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mead House

Meadowlark Dairy Building

Location: 619 Legion Way SE
Wohleb

meadowlark_1965Meadowlark Dairy Building, 1965, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives meadowlark dairyMeadowlark Dairy Building today (2015), photo by Deborah Ross

Demonstrating the breadth of his expertise from sublime to utilitarian, Olympia’s iconic architect Joseph Wohleb designed this no-nonsense building for the Meadowlark Dairy in 1943. The dairy was one of several in downtown Olympia. It supplied milk to the Olympia School District through the war years. The building now is split between a popular eatery and a state office.

More information:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Meadowlark Dairy Building

Medical Arts Building

Location:  1015 4th Ave SW
mid-Century modern

med arts picturePerspective of Medical Arts Building, about 1962, Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMedical Arts Building today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Medical Arts Building was commissioned in 1962 by doctors E.V. Olson and William Bigelow. It was completed in 1966. The building was adjacent to St. Peter’s Hospital on Sherman Street, on the West Side,  and housed a variety of medical practitioners, including a pharmacy. The doctors hired noted local architect G. Stacey Bennett to produce a modern, yet practical building whose beauty and utility continue remarkably intact nearly fifty years later.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

mid-Century Modern Tour Guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Medical Arts Building

Meeker House

Location: 1202 10th Ave SW
Local register

meeker_1959Meeker House 1959, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Meeker House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This elaborate Mission revival style building overlooks Capitol Lake. It was erected in 1924 by builder Ernest Meeker (see also La Villa-Meeker Mansion). Its former owner believes it may be a Joseph Wohleb design, consistent with Wohleb’s signature Mission style. Its crenellated roof gives a castle-like appearance when seen from Deschutes Parkway. The building is on the local register.

Many thanks to owner Angela Bowen for additional information about this house. 

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Meeker House

Meeker/Bean House

Location: 834 Percival Street SW
Local register; Diversity: Jewish Heritage

meekerbean_1957Meeker/Bean House 1957, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Meeker/Bean House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This is the first-built of three unusual homes designed by builder Ernest Meeker overlooking the Deschutes Estuary in Southwest Olympia (see Meeker House and La Villa-Meeker Mansion). Each of these spectacular homes has a unique vision and takes advantage of their beautiful wooded setting on the edge of a ravine. The Meeker/Bean home was erected in 1918 and has seven levels, cascading down the hillside. Earl Bean, owner of Olympia Supply Company, purchased the home in 1927, converting an upstairs ballroom into bedrooms for his large family. In the 1970s the home was almost completely gutted by fire and stood vacant for many years, until in 2003 it was purchased and restored, inside and out, to its former Craftsman style glory. It is on the local register. The Bean family was, and continues to be, a prominent member of Olympia’s Jewish community as well as anchoring an important commercial location downtown until 2016.

Links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Meeker/Bean House

Memorial Clinic building (demolished)

Location: 529 4th Ave W
Wohleb; mid-Century modern

Memorial Clinic_1949Memorial Clinic building, 1949, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives Memorial Clinic building

Memorial Clinic building in 2013, photo by Deb Ross

 

The Memorial  Clinic building was designed by local architect father and son team Robert and Joseph Wohleb and built in 1948. The photograph at above left was taken shortly after it was completed, and a close inspection reveals the Capitol Dome in the background still under repair after the 1949 earthquake. The clinic was an innovative concept at the time, grouping several physicians and specialties under one roof. It was located near downtown but handily close to  St. Peter Hospital, then on Sherman Street. Accordingly, when the current St. Peter Hospital was built in the 1970s, the clinic moved to remain close. The building then served as the Thurston County Department of Health until the 2000s. It was demolished in 2015.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, mid-Century modern walking tour

Looking Back feature, shows interior

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged | Comments Off on Memorial Clinic building (demolished)

Merryman House

Location: 3520 Boulevard Rd SE

No vintage photograph of this house has been located; if you have one to share, please contact us. ???????????????????????????????Merryman House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Merryman House was built some time between 1892 and 1903 (sources vary) by Alexander Merryman, who arrived in Thurston County in 1890. It remained in the Merryman family until very recent times. The home was located on a rise, set back from Boulevard Road, which was originally an old trail leading from the Thurston County prairies to the outskirts of Olympia. Merryman built the home out of cedar logged on the property. He cut a trail through his homestead acreage, which later became Morse-Merryman Road. The family operated a blacksmith shop and a dairy on the property as well.

The home was moved slightly to the south in the early 2000s to make way for a housing development, but maintains its original simple pioneer style appearance, including original cedar siding. A signboard at the new location tells the story of the home and the Merryman family.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged | Comments Off on Merryman House

Methodist Church – second site at 5th and Adams

Location: Northwest corner Adams and 5th
Religious institutions

First Methodist, around 1903, First United Methodist Church of Olympia Former site of First Methodist today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

Another example of a “paved Paradise” in downtown Olympia. The congregation of the First Methodist Episcopal church outgrew its first building just north of here in the early 1890s and began planning a new, larger building. An early conceptual design sketched in the Olympia Tribune Souvenir Issue of 1891 must have failed, for a more modest building, though still much larger than the original, was erected here in 1901. When the congregation again outgrew this building, they raised it and built a basement underground, which was subject to flooding due to its proximity to the Swantown Slough and the many artesian wells in the area.

While the congregation was mulling over further expansion plans, the 1949 earthquake hit, causing severe structural damage, and the building was condemned. The congregation met for a time in a theatre, and then moved to its current location at Legion Way and Boundary. This building was still in existence into the 1950s, for Olympian photographs show the Pet Parade processing past it, with its elevated porch serving as a viewing stand. The location is currently a parking lot, the natural fate of many purpose-built ecclesiastical buildings, as narrated in the  page for Gloria Dei, which stood across Fifth Avenue from this church.

Additional resources:

History of First United Methodist Church

Thanks to First Methodist Church  for information and use of photograph.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Methodist Church – second site at 5th and Adams

Metropolitan Life Insurance Building

Location:  1006 4th Ave NE
mid-Century modern

metropolitan lifeMetropolitan Life Insurance Building 1960s, Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation files  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMetropolitan Life Insurance Building (Crain’s Office Supply) today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This small Miesian style building was designed in 1958 by architect Kenneth Ripley and served as the Olympia office of Metropolitan Life until the 1970s. Its distinctive low profile and windows reaching up to the eaves were accentuated by beams that held up the flat roof. These have now been obscured by a metal parapet.

The building is on the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation inventory as part of DAHP’s modernism project.

Additional resources:

Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Inventory,  property 102772 

mid-Century Modern Tour Guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Metropolitan Life Insurance Building

Meyer-Chitty House

Location: 616 Milas St NE

meyer_1936Meyer-Chitty House 1936, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMeyer-Chitty House today (2014), photo by Deborah Ross

Perched atop a bluff in East Olympia, overlooking Budd Inlet, the Meyer House is a well-preserved Craftsman style bungalow. It was built in the early 1920s by Henry and Millie Meyer. It was later owned by Fred Chitty, a manager for the Daily Olympian. It is not yet inventoried.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Meyer-Chitty House

Meyer-Riddle House

Location: 1136 East Bay Drive NE
National Register, State Register, Local Register, Women’s History, Diversity: Germans

meyer riddle thenMeyer House ca. 1910, photo courtesy of Olympia Mansion  Meyer-Riddle House

Meyer-Riddle House today (2010), photo by Deborah Ross

The Meyer Riddle House was built in 1904 by Victor Meyer, a German immigrant who moved to Olympia in the late 19th century. He was a plumber and contractor by trade, and his two sons were also  in the building industry. Lena Meyer was active in the women’s suffrage movement. The house is unique in being made of artistic concrete block, a building material that was very popular elsewhere in the country at the time, but was unique to Olympia. The concrete is shaped and colored to resemble stone. The house is on three levels with balustrades on every level; an artesian well in the back supplied water to the home. There is also a tunnel leading from East Bay Drive to the basement of the building.

After the Meyers left, the home was acquired by Emma Riddle, who created a massage and nerve treatment center here, as well as operating a boarding house on the upper two levels.

The house was extensively remodeled beginning in the 1980s and has been operated as a bed and breakfast/rental facility for several years. It is listed on the national, state and local registers as a fine example of unusual building materials.

For more information follow these links:

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter catalog number in Collections Search box): C1964.26.4.6.2

Olympia Heritage inventory

PCTV/TCTV produced video on Meyer-Riddle House, available for viewing on Youtube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Meyer-Riddle House

Mills, George G/Kent House

Location: 2061 East Bay Drive NE
Local register

MillsKent_1955George G Mills/Kent House 1955, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGeorge G Mills/Kent House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

This elegant English Revival home, on the east shore of Budd Inlet, was built in 1920 with a design by Seattle architects Thomas and Totty. Owners were George G Mills and his wife Helen Merritt Mills. George G was the son of George W Mills, an early Thurston County pioneer (George G’s brother, Jesse, founded the Mills and Mills Funeral Parlor; see Parker/Mills House). He owned a hardware store and also was a land registrar and teacher.

The home was acquired by the Kent family in 1941; according to the historic plaque, it was the venue for many social occasions over the decades. It is still (2014) owned by the family. The home is on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Mills family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mills, George G/Kent House

Mills and Mills/Sticklin Undertakers building

Location: 414 Franklin St SE
Religious Institutions

sticklinSticklin Undertakers around 1914, photo courtesy of Washington State Historical Society tapestrySticklin Undertakers/Mills and Mills building today (2012), photo by Matt Kennelly

This building on Franklin Street is one of the oldest mortuaries in Olympia, built about 1900. At the time of the photograph at above left, taken by photographer Robert Esterly, it was managed by Hugh Sticklin. Shortly after that the business was acquired by Jesse Mills, of the pioneer Mills family. The Mills family operated the business until recently, when it has hosted religious communities and retail operations. It has an unusual elongated fourquare style.

For more information follow these links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington State Historical Society (enter following catalog number in Collections Search box): 2010.149.7.2

For more information on the Mills family,see the Residents section of this website. See also the Parker/Mills house 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mills and Mills/Sticklin Undertakers building

Minor House

Location: 1528 Columbia St SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood; Diversity: Scandinavians

Minor_1937Minor House, 1937, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMinor House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

Like its next-door neighbor, the Harmon House, the Minor House, built in 1922, is one of several homes that were ordered by catalogue from the Tumwater Lumber Mills Ready Cut Homes. The company was founded by the Anderson family, who were Swedish. Over fifty homes in the South Capitol Neighborhood were from the TLM catalogue. Five homes in a row in this block were dubbed “Swede row,” in recognition of the Anderson family’s origin. The Minor House’s  design was featured in TLM’s catalogue. Its first owner was Ernest Minor, an accountant with the state. It is on the local register and located in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

downloadable Tumwater Lumber Mills catalogue 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Minor House

Mitchell House

Location: 435 Rogers St NW
Local register

mitchell house_1938Mitchell House 1939, Thurston County Assessor Photo, Washington State Archives Mitchell House

Mitchell House today (2010), photo by Deb Ross

 

This house, built by Dr. David Mitchell and his wife in about 1892, was among the first wave of fine houses built in the Woodruff subdivision when Samuel Woodruff began developing West Olympia. It is a Queen Anne style house with partial gable roof and an unusual and attractive latticework wall around porch and balcony on the ground and upper level.

The home is on the local register and is remarkably well preserved.

For more information follow these links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter the following catalog number in Collections Search box):C1964.26.4.7.3

For more information about Dr. Mitchell and his wife, see the Residents section of this website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mitchell House

Moore House

Location: 3811 Pifer Rd SE
Local register; Women’s History

johnmoore_1939Moore House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMoore House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

John and Olivia Moore built this unusual stucco bungalow in 1927. At the time, the location on Pifer Road was far in the outskirts of Olympia, past the Cloverfield farm. John Moore was a local contractor and designed and built the home. Olivia Moore was an organizer for the waitress and cooks union and held national office in the union during a time when women were just being recognized for their contributions to the union movement. The home is on the local register.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Dishing It Out: Waitresses and Their Unions in the 20th Century

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Moore House

Moore, Janet House

Location: 401 17th Ave SW
Women’s History; local register; South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

moore_1958Janet Moore House, 1957, Thurston County assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJanet Moore House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

Janet Moore was one of the most prominent women in Olympia’s early history. Daughter of Philip D. Moore, himself a well-known Olympia pioneer, Janet was active in women’s rights issues, a charter member of the Woman’s Club, a preacher in the Unitarian Church, the establishment of the public library, later the Carnegie library, and a 40-year teacher in Olympia’s schools. She built this handsome Craftsman-style home overlooking the Deschutes Estuary in about 1911, and soon after, census data and directories show her brothers Lindley and Schooley living with her. Later on, her father moved into the household. The home is on the local register and located in the South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

Women’s History Walking Tour

For more information about the Moores, see the Residents section of our website.

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Moore, Janet House

Morris House

Location: 110 26th Ave SW
South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

morrishouse_1936Morris House, 1936, Thurston County assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
???????????????????????????????
Morris House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

This imposing colonial revival home was owned by two unrelated families named Morris. Justice George Morris built the large home, with its impressive landscaping, 1909 to 1918, and served as Chief Justice from 1916 to 1917. Later on, Mel and Irma Morris bought the house. The Morrises owned the most important ladies’ clothing store, M.M. Morris, at the corner of Washington and Fourth, in the Martin Building. The home is in the South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District. It is inventoried, but not on the local register.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Morris House

Mottman Building

Location: 101 Capitol Way N
Local Register, State Register, National Register, National Historic District, Diversity: Jewish heritage

Toklas & Kaufman's Store (pg 2)The Toklas and Kaufman building (now Mottman Building) around 1891
charcoal-enhanced photograph from Olympia Tribune Souvenir Issue of 1891, scanned at Washington State Library
mottman buildingThe Mottman Building today (2012) Photograph courtesy of Deb Ross 

Most would agree that the intersection of Capitol Way and Fourth Avenue is the center of Downtown Olympia. Near here, Gallewski Kaufman and Ferdinand Toklas started a small mercantile store in the mid 1880s. (Toklas was father of famed expatriate Alice B. Toklas). It grew quickly and in the late 1880s Kaufman’s son Nathan persuaded the partners to build a great new building on the northwest corner of the intersection. This building, originally called the Olympia or Olympic Block, and built by brothers Sam and Charles Williams, was complete by 1891 (sources vary on the exact year of completion). It was erected on the site of the Sam Williams’s residence, whose store, Olympia Hardware was next door (the building still exists). According to historian Bernice Sapp, Williams’s house was moved to a location just south of the YMCA building.

The Toklas and Kaufman store store was originally two stories high. It featured all the modern conveniences, including two electric light fixtures (and 8 gas fixtures), an electric signaling system, and an efficient, knowledgeable staff. In the early 1890s, the store was sold to George Mottman. Mottman built a third story in 1911, and installed the first elevator in Olympia. The building was badly damaged during the 1949 earthquake, and has been modified significantly over the years.

For more information about and historical photographs of the building and the Kaufman family, follow these links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Olympia Downtown District National Register listing

Washington State Historical Society (enter catalog number in Collections Search box): C1949.1242.7 (street paving in 1909, Mottman Building in background); C1981.30x.4 (earthquake damage) ,  C1964.26.4.12.6;  C2008.5.47 (Sam Williams home and store)

Digital Archives photograph (same photograph as above without charcoal enhancements)

Private postcard collection 

Youtube video about the intersection of 4th and Capitol, episode in Now Where Were We? series

Link here to a memoir and selected information about this intersection and the Mottman building (Olyblog, source unattributed)

Downtown Olympia Walking Tour

Sapp, Olympia 100 years ago

For biographies and photographs of G. and Nathan Kaufman, and Charles and Sam Williams, see Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mottman Building

Mowell House/Site of Central School/GAR Building

Location: 200 Union Ave SE
Women’s History,  Schools, Popular culture; State register (Central School building)

central schoolCentral School, around 1882, photo from State Library Photograph Collection, Digital Archives mowell houseMowell House today (2012), photo by Matthew Kennelly

In the 1850s a school was erected at the corner of Union and Washington at this location, serving for a short time as the original location of the Puget Sound Wesleyan Institute. When that institution moved to larger quarters on Olympia’s east side (see Olympia Collegiate Institute site), the building was used for a time as the Thurston County courthouse. This proved impractical since the building was some distance from downtown Olympia and roads were unpaved and muddy. The building was then leased to Pamela Case Hale and Carrie Churchill for a school; starting in the 1870s, the building was again used as a public schoolhouse, the Central School.

For a time, this building was also the home of the Grand  Army of the Republic (GAR) clubhouse and its successor, Sons of the Veterans.

Dr. John Mowell and his wife, prominent women’s advocate Ada Sprague Mowell, acquired the property and moved the schoolhouse building to its current location at Union and Adams, where it is now an apartment building. The building is on the state register. The Mowells built the above home, a classic Foursquare, about 1907.

For more information follow these links:

Washington  State Historical  Society photographs (enter catalog numbers in Collections Search box): C1959.267x.10 ; C2017.0.70 (Sons of Veterans); C2013.18.176

Olympia Heritage inventory, Mowell House; Central School building

Digital Archives photo above

City of Olympia Women’s Walking Tour

Story map, Thurston County courthouses

Bird’s Eye View of Olympia, 1879 (item no. 2 at Union and Washington)

Sapp, Olympia 100 Years ago

For more information about Pamela Case Hale, Ada Sprague Mowell and John Mowell, see the Residents section of this website (H, S, M)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Mowell House/Site of Central School/GAR Building

Munson House

Location: 2112 Capitol Way S
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

munson_1939Munson House, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMunson House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Munson House was built in 1924 by the Munson family. Fred G. Munson was a member of a prominent Olympia pioneer family (see Munson store). He owned a drug store downtown.

This English revival home is on the local register as well as located in the South Capitol National Historic District.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District listing

For more information on the Munson family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Munson House

Music Studio

Location: 1513 Columbia St SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood

musicstudio_1937Music Studio, 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives
Music StudioMusic Studio today (2013), photo by Marisa Merkel

An early and excellent example of the Craftsman style bungalow typical of the South Capitol neighborhood, the Music Studio was built around 1914. It received its name from the Torlakson family that operated a music studio at this address for a number of years in the 1930s. The open timber framework over the door is particularly characteristic of this style. The home has been nicely restored, is on the local register and located in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood.

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol Neighborhood National Historic District

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Comments Off on Music Studio

Mustard House

Location: 1617 Capitol Way S
South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood; Women’s History

mustard_1936Mustard House, 1936, Thurston County Assessor, Southwest Regional Archives OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMustard House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Mustard House on Capitol Way in the South Capitol National Historic Neighborhood is one of the most prominent homes in the neighborhood. Designed in the Queen Anne style, it was built around 1886 and may have been originally located in what is now the Capitol Campus. By the early 20th century, it was located here and occupied by a husband and wife doctor team, Jack and Flora Mustard. Flora Mustard was a daughter of Olympia mayor A.H. Chambers, from an eminent pioneer family (see also nearby Chambers House and Chambers Block, both owned by A.H.). The home has retained most of its original features. It is not on a heritage register, but has been inventoried.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District listing

For more information on the Chambers family, see the Residents section of this website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Locations of Historic Interest | Tagged , | Comments Off on Mustard House