Author Archives: Deb Ross

Margaret McKenny – 9/26/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1950 cityscape depicts Margaret McKenny in conversation with a young man who will be featured on his own account in an upcoming Looking Back. Miss McKenny grew up in Olympia and in her adulthood became a world-renowned mushroom expert, naturalist, and environmental advocate. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/

1962 photograph, The Olympian collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Margaret McKenny – 9/26/21

Josephine Corliss Preston – 9/19/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In the 1933 cityscape we see the Old State Capitol Building, which had recently been repurposed to the house the Superintendent of Public Instruction after the Legislative Building was completed in 1926. Pictured revisiting her old haunts is Josephine Corliss Preston, former superintendent from 1913-1929, and the first woman elected to office in Washington State.    Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/

Superintendent of Public Instruction Election Pamphlet, 1915

 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Josephine Corliss Preston – 9/19/21

Olympia Opera House – 9/12/2021

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. At the far right of the 1899 cityscape is the Olympia Opera House, built in 1890 by publisher John Miller Murphy. Over its short 35 year life, it hosted national celebrities such as Mark Twain, and many local productions.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/

Olympia Opera House, State Library photograph collection, Washington State Archives, about 1890

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Olympia Opera House – 9/12/2021

Capitol Center building – 9/5/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. Shown in the distance of the 1972 cityscape is the Capitol Center Building, erected in 1966. The building was the feather in local architect G. Stacey Bennett’s cap. It featured cutting edge modernism with its glass curtain effect, termed the Miesian style, after Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. It has been rehabilitated and remodeled as the Views on Fifth apartment building. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/

late 1960s photo, courtesy Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Capitol Center building – 9/5/21

Mother Joseph – 8/29/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1899 cityscape includes an elderly Mother Joseph visiting St. Peter’s Hospital, one of the many schools and hospitals that her order, the Sisters of Providence, built during her long tenure in the Pacific Northwest. Mother Joseph is honored with statues in our Legislative Building and the U.S. Senate Statuary Hall.  For more information, visit us at olympiahistory.org. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1899-2/

Courtesy Providence archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Mother Joseph – 8/29/21

Isaac Ellis – 8/22/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1874 cityscape includes Isaac (Ike) Ellis. Ellis was a noted and successful lumberman, establishing efficient logging and milling operations throughout Puget Sound. Later in his life, he invested in a short-lived racetrack in what is now Lacey.  For more information, visit us at olympiahistory.org. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1874-building-a-railroad/.

Unknown photographer, 1860-1880, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Isaac Ellis – 8/22/21

George Bush – 8/15/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1856 cityscape includes George Bush, early American settler. He and the Simmons party arrived first in Oregon Territory; but as a mixed race man, Bush was not welcome there. The party proceeded north to what is now Tumwater, where Bush and his wife Isabella helped countless fellow settlers to establish their homesteads. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society. For more information see. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1856-the-indian-war/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on George Bush – 8/15/21

Heritage Fountain – 8/8/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 2001 cityscape includes the popular Heritage Fountain, between Fourth and Fifth Avenues. The property was acquired by the city, with the fountain donated by a generous family. It was dedicated in 1996 and is one of the few public recreational water features in our city. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/2001-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Heritage Fountain – 8/8/21

Joyce Simmons Cheeka – 8/1/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1972 cityscape includes Joyce Simmons Cheeka, Squaxin Island Tribe activist. Mrs. Cheeka was trained as a Rememberer, responsible for preserving and celebrating her tribal culture.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Joyce Simmons Cheeka – 8/1/21

5th Avenue dam construction – 7/24/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1950 cityscape features construction of the Fifth Avenue dam and bridge to create Capitol Lake. In this photo from 1949 we can see the project from the vantage point of the Fourth Avenue Bridge. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information, visit us at olympiahistory.org. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1950-2/.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 5th Avenue dam construction – 7/24/21

Hotel Olympian – 7/18/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. When the state acquired the Old State Capitol Building and moved the seat of government to downtown Olympia, it was apparent that downtown accommodations were inadequate to house all of the legislators, lobbyists and others during legislative session. After much delay, the elegant five-story Hotel Olympian, pictured in the 1933 cityscape, was completed in 1920, directly to the north of Sylvester Park. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1933-2/6/27/21

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Hotel Olympian – 7/18/21

S.S. Beaver – 7/11/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The S.S. Beaver, pictured in the 1856 cityscape, was the first steam-operated vessel in Puget Sound. She was owned by the British Hudson’s Bay Company and plied the waters of our sound and all the way to Alaska, until she foundered in 1888. The Vancouver (B.C.) Maritime Museum has a display with several of her salvaged parts. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1856-the-indian-war/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on S.S. Beaver – 7/11/21

Bicycles – 7/4/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1899 cityscape features a bicycle parade around the grounds of Sylvester Park. Bicycling was all the rage in the last years of the 19th century. Pictured here are Olympia’s Robert Blankenship and another unidentified man with their “wheels,” including a high-wheeled pennyfarthing, already going out of style when the photo was taken.   Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1899-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Bicycles – 7/4/21

Bertha Eugley – 6/27/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In the 1899 cityscape we see Bertha Eugley in front of her millinery (hat) store on 6th Avenue (now Legion). Late nineteenth century women would not dream of going out in public without a hat, and Mrs. Eugley made sure that those who could afford it had the opportunity to sport her latest, elaborate creations. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1899-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Bertha Eugley – 6/27/21

Anna Conner Hartsuck – 6/20/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1874 cityscape includes Anna Conner Hartsuck, a so-called “Mercer Girl,” brought to the Pacific Northwest in the 1860s to remedy a deficit of eligible brides. The Mercer Girls story inspired the TV series “Here Come the Brides.” Anna married Mark Hartsuck and was a prominent member of Olympia society.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1874-building-a-railroad/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Anna Conner Hartsuck – 6/20/21

Clara Sylvester – 6/13/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1856 cityscape depicts Clara Pottle Sylvester with her husband, Olympia’s co-founder Edmund Sylvester, pointing out their new home, then under construction. Clara arrived in Olympia as a newlywed in 1854. She was an ardent supporter of women’s suffrage and helped establish the Woman’s Club, one of the first on the West Coast.   Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, https://olympiahistory.org/1856-the-indian-war/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Clara Sylvester – 6/13/21

Bulletin – 6/1/21

June 1, 2021      
 

To all our very valued Bulletin recipients,

Due to increasing personal time constraints, I am reluctantly stepping away from writing the Bulletin. My association with OHS-BHM has been one of the most enlightening experiences I have had, with both the Bulletin and my repair and restoration work on the Bigelow House Museum. I am not going away entirely; the Society’s Interior Design expert David Goularte and I have some restoration in the works for Bigelow House. You won’t want to miss the new look when Bigelow House Museum reopens, probably in 2022!
 
And finally, it is with great humility that I pass on the following  statement from OHS/BHM Board President Greg Alexander:
 
“With this last edition, I want to thank David Ponta for his work over the past 5 years dedicated to researching, composing, and posting of the Bulletin. During this time, David has volunteered his valuable time to provide you, our Olympia Historical Society-Bigelow House Museum (OHS-BHM) members, with timely information on programs and events related to heritage, culture, and the arts taking place in the South Sound region. Like you, I have found the Bulletin to be a great source of information and a valued benefit of OHS-BHM membership conveniently delivered to my email in-box. With David’s decision to devote more time to his other interests, OHS-BHM board members will explore in the near future, options for continuing the Bulletin with a new editor and/or format.”
 
Thanks Greg.
 
Join us in exploring, preserving and promoting Olympia’s history. We are a non-profit membership-based organization presenting the stories from our past to enrich the present and inform the future of Olympia. The Bigelow House Museum, owned and operated by the Society and Museum, is the oldest residence in Olympia, Washington, and one of the earliest still standing in the Pacific Northwest.
 
The Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum is now selling a limited number of a wonderful book about local maritime heritage: Tugs and Other Hard-Working Vessels of Puget Sound:  A Scrapbook from the Earlier Days, by Olympia native and naval architect and marine engineer, the late Norman R.  Knutsen.  The book is being made available through the generosity of the Knutsen Family.  The softbound, 345 page book, is extensively illustrated, including many rare images of Olympia maritime history.  The book, with the net proceeds benefitting the Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum, is available by mail only with credit or debit card or PayPal account, and sells for $48.08 including postage, handling and sales tax.  To order your copy, click Here. Note that although this takes you to PayPal, a PayPal account not required for purchase!
 

We would love you to shop local, but if you do happen to be shopping on line, please consider clicking on the Amazon Smile logo and designating us as the beneficiary of this program, where a percentage of your purchase will go to support our programs. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Click on any of the links provided here to be taken to their donation pages. 
THANK YOU!!!
_______________________________________________________________
 
Many Voices – A Resource Guide.
 
In response to the many requests Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum has received over the years for resources to study the local history of communities which have often been overlooked, we have put together an in depth collection of online materials focusing on such groups. Ranging from general information to sites focusing on communities of color, of Asian ancestry, Indigenous peoples and places, Latinx, Pacific Islanders, and the LGBTQ+, this work in progress is brimming with fascinating, enlightening information and research materials. These resources may be accessed at HereYOUR INPUT IS WELCOME AND ESSENTIAL TO THIS PROCESS! If you have any suggestions, please submit them to mailto:olyhistory@gmail.com.
______________________________________________________________
 

Welcome Poet Laureate Ashly McBunch

“I feel the healing power of words are unmistakable.  We, as individuals, have a human sense of duty within our professional and personal circles to use this power to sculpt bridges.  Bridges that connect one Olympian citizen to the next, to see each other as we see ourselves.”
 
Ashly McBunch was recently appointed to the position of Poet Laureate by the Olympia City Council. During their two year term, McBunch plans to encourage the voices of others through the Poet Laureate platform: “The audience will be inclusive and diverse to show the beauty behind groups not often seen and voices not often heard. It will be about promoting and expansion and provide a safe space for everyone to find peace through expression.” McBunch’s term extends from July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2023. They can be reached at poetlaureate@ci.olympia.wa.us.
 
About the Poet Laureate Program
 
Every two years the City of Olympia selects a Poet Laureate to engage our entire community in the literary arts. Olympia’s take on the position of Poet Laureate is less an honorary title and more about service over status. Duties include: promoting poetry as an art form, expanding access to the literary arts, and encouraging poetry as a community voice that contributes to a sense of place. Olympia’s next Poet Laureate is called specifically to utilize the power of poetry and language to contribute insight, foster understanding and support healing around issues of equity and inclusion in our community.
______________________________________________________________
  • May 28 – June 11. Lacey Museum – History Scavenger Hunt.

 

Come explore the Lacey Train Depot and Woodland Creek Community Park and search for markers highlighting historical places and people, and learn some fun facts about the area’s history along the way! The scavenger hunt starts at the parking lot across from the Lacey Train Depot where you’ll find directions and clues for all of the scavenger hunt markers, attached to the new museum sign. Find some historical places and people at the Lacey Train Depot, then head over to Woodland Creek Community Park to continue the search! Participants who find all 10 markers can pick up a goody bag at the Parks, Culture, and Recreation counter at City Hall during public hours: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Download the Scavenger Hunt DirectionsScavenger Hunt Clue Sheet, the Woodland Creek Community Park Scavenger Hunt Boundary Map, and the Scavenger Hunt Map to get started!

  • June 1, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Gig Harbor History Museum Literary Society ZOOM event: Today We Go Home by Kelli Estes.

 


 

Join the Gig Harbor Museum Literary Society for a discussion of Kelli Estes’ second novel which interweaves the stories of two women from different time periods. Today We Go Home features Larkin Bennett, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan who is faced with the gutting experience of losing her closest friend from her unit. Struggling to heal, Bennett discovers an unexpected treasure – the diary of Emily Wilson, a young woman who disguised herself as a man to fight for the Union in the Civil War. Bennet finds herself drawn deeply into Wilson’s life and the secrets she kept. Estes grew up in the dry lands of Eastern Washington and Arizona and now lives in the Seattle area. For questions, please contact Cindy Hackett at cynthia.hale.hackett@gmail.com . Click Here to register for this event, visit Here for more information.

  • June 4, 6:30PM – 8:00PM. Lacey Veterans Service Hub: Mayor’s Virtual Gala and Fundraiser. 

Join Lacey Mayor Andy Ryder for a virtual evening of fun and fundraising, including guest speakers, raffle prizes, a premier video tour of the newly remodeled Lacey Veterans Services Hub, and more! There are 32,000 Veterans living in Thurston County, and the Lacey Veterans Service Hub provides local access to vital programs and services. Proceeds from the Lacey Mayor’s Gala will go to the Lacey Veterans Services Hub to support their programs and services which directly benefit our local Veterans and their families, including:
 
VA Benefits, Housing and Nutrition
Education, Employment and Training
Counseling, Peer-to-Peer Support
Financial and Legal Aid
 
Register and purchase raffle tickets at http://ci.lacey.wa.us/2021-mayors-gala. Prizes include:
 
Alderbrook Resort & Spa – Enjoy your choice of lodging, dining, and spa services – Value $1,000
Glacier Aviation Helicopter Tour – One-hour flight for two – Value $600
Mystic Journey’s Sunset Tour – Three-hour sunset boat cruise for up to 6 people – Value $450
 
For more information, contact City of Lacey Public Affairs at 360-491-3214, or email  PublicAffairs@ci.lacey.wa.us

  • June 5, 1:00PM – 4:00PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum: Heritage Skills Workshop – 19th Century Cosmetics.

 


 
Fort Interpreter Elizabeth, of Beth’s Bobbins Blog, will demonstrate how to make up your own 19th century makeup! Using historic recipes and materials found in your local grocery or garden participants will create:
 
Cold Cream (skin care)
Hungary Water (perfume and base for other cosmetics)
Spanish Rouge (coloring agent)
Pomatum (styling aid)
Burnt Cloves* (coloring agent)
 
Elizabeth will also be demonstrating the process of steam distillation to extract the “essence” of different herbs and flowers using a period still. Some supplies will be included. This event is taking place at Fort Nisqually, 5519 Five Mile Dr., Tacoma. For more information and to register, visit Here.

  • June 10, 6:00PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum: Fort from Home – Puget Sound Treaty War Panel.
The Puget Sound Treaty War Panel series resumes on Thursday, June 10th, 2021. The conversation will focus on the era leading up to, and include, the signing of the Medicine Creek Treaty. The Puget Sound Treaty War (1855-1866) was the result of contested terms of the Medicine Creek Treaty, negotiated by Governor Isaac Stevens. The treaty, the first of several consecutive treaties negotiated by Stevens in quick succession, sought the relocation of local tribes to reservations in exchange for cash payments and the preservation of hunting and fishing rights. The treaty became a catalyst for the conflict. The Treaty War remains central to Puget Sound history. This free program brings together a panel of historians to discuss the experiences and effects of these events. With representatives from Nisqually, Puyallup, Squaxin Island and Muckleshoot Tribes, as well as Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, the panel offers a new dialogue among diverse communities impacted by the War and its aftermath.
 
Panelists will include:
 
Brandon Reynon, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Puyallup Tribe
Danny Marshall, Chairperson, Steilacoom Indian Tribe
Jerry Eckrom, Historian, Fort Nisqually Living History Museum
Nettsie Bullchild, Nisqually Tribe Archives/Tribal Historic Preservation Office Director, Nisqually Tribe
Warren KingGeorge, Historian, Muckleshoot Indian Tribe
 
This panel will be moderated by Jennifer Ott, Assistant Director, HistoryLink.org.
In advance of the panel, we encourage you to learn more about participating Tribes by visiting their websites:
 
Muckleshoot Tribe: https://www.npaihb.org/member-tribes/muckleshoot-tribe
Nisqually Tribe: http://www.nisqually-nsn.gov
Puyaləpabš (Puyallup): http://www.puyallup-tribe.com/ourtribe
Steilacoom Tribe: http://steilacoomtribe.blogspot.com/2009/01/history.html
Squaxin Island Tribe: https://squaxinisland.org
  • June 10, 6:00PM – 7:30PM. Washington State Historical Society– Crossing Boundaries; Portraits of a Transgender West.
 
 
Join WSHS for an immersive discussion surrounding the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West with curator Peter Boag, Professor and Columbia Chair in History of the American West at Washington State University, and author of Re-Dressing America’s Frontier Past. As Americans moved across the country to create new lives, some also used the opportunity to establish their authentic selves. Boag discusses his quest to find the history of those who changed their assigned genders when moving west, and how they were written out of American history. Washington State Historical Society’s Lead Curator Gwen Whiting will also discuss the materials used in the exhibition in order to illustrate these underrepresented stories.This program will be livestreamed on Facebook, but you do not need to have a Facebook account, nor to sign in to Facebook, to see it. The live program is viewable for everyone. Click Watch Here to see the program when it begins at 6 PM on June 10, 2021. (Note: At this link, you can also see archived videos from the other public programs WSHS has  presented during the past year.) This program is free, and open to all ages. For more information visit Here The exhibition Crossing Boundaries is on view at the Washington State History Museum from May 29 through December 12, 2021.

  • June 10, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM. Gig Harbor History Museum Literary Society ZOOM Event: Thunderbird Film Preview and Discussion.
 
Eric Lindal will preview his new film on the history of the Thunderbird sailboat and what makes this boat so exciting and sought-after. Designed in Seattle in 1958 and named Thunderbird 26, it has an almost cult-like status among sailors and boat lovers. This virtual presentation will be hosted by the Museum’s  Executive Director, Stephanie Lile. To participate and receive a link to this fascinating presentation, you may  email Robin Harrison at operations@harborhistorymuseum.org.
  • June 13, 2:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom Virtual Event – The Pig War of 1859.

Join the Fort for an online talk by historian and author Mike Vouri about the Pig War of 1859 in Washington Territory. Long before the San Juan Islands were a vacation destination, they were the focus of an international crisis ignited by an unlikely incident: The shooting of a pig in a potato patch. Mike Vouri is the author of five books about national, state and regional history, including The Pig War: Stand-off at Griffin Bay. In order to sign up for this free event, visit Everbrite.

  • June 14, 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society – Homewaters Author Interview.
 
 
Join THS  for their June virtual meeting, as the Society’s Communications Manager Kim Davenport interviews David B. Williams, author of the new book Homewaters
Not far from Seattle skyscrapers live 150-year-old clams, more than 250 species of fish, and underwater kelp forests as complex as any terrestrial ecosystem. For millennia, vibrant Coast Salish communities have lived beside these waters dense with nutrient-rich foods, with cultures intertwined through exchanges across the waterways. Transformed by settlement and resource extraction, Puget Sound and its future health now depend on a better understanding of the region’s ecological complexities. Focusing on the area south of Port Townsend and between the Cascade and Olympic mountains, Williams uncovers human and natural histories in, on, and around the Sound. In conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, Williams traces how generations of humans have interacted with such species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. He sheds light on how warfare shaped development and how people have moved across this maritime highway, in canoes, the mosquito fleet, and today’s ferry system. The book also takes an unflinching look at how the Sound’s ecosystems have suffered from human behavior, including pollution, habitat destruction, and the effects of climate change. Tune in on the THS  YouTube Channel, or on their Facebook page to watch.
  • June 17, 7:00PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum: Fort from Home Nightcap – Medical Treatments and Remedies of the 19th Century.
 
 
Victorian medicine was a unique mix of old beliefs and scientific discovery. Dr. Tolmie, Fort Nisqually’s Chief Factor and a practicing Doctor, joined his contemporaries in applying both approaches in his treatments and remedies. Join Fort Nisqually Curator, Caitlin, for Fort from Home Nightcap: Medical Treatments and Remedies of the 19th Century. Visit Register Now to sign up.
  • June 19, 10:00AM – 5:00PM. Washington State Historical Society– Honoring Juneteenth.
On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger proclaimed the end of slavery in the state of Texas, two and a half years after Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. Variously referred to as Liberation Day, Emancipation Day, Freedom Day, and Jubilee Day, June 19 is celebrated in most major cities in the United States on varying levels. Washington State Historical Society encourages you to join in the acknowledgement of this vital date  with their many partners who preserve the history of Black Americans and  Washingtonians, including:
 
The Black Heritage Society of Washington State
BlackPast.org
The Buffalo Soldiers Museum
Northwest African American Museum
 
You can also connect with more Black arts and heritage organizations in our state through the Artist Trust website.
 
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture offers several blogposts about the legacy and celebration of Juneteenth, including these selections:
 
The Historical Legacy of Juneteenth | National Museum of African American History and Culture (si.edu)
Celebrating Juneteenth | National Museum of African American History and Culture (si.edu)
 
 And below are some comprehensive lists of books and reading materials regarding Juneteenth:
 
10 Books to Celebrate Juneteenth No Matter Your Age — Black & Bookish (blackandbookish.com)
Books to Read for Juneteenth, as Recommended by DC’s Black Educators (msn.com)
9 Books About Juneteenth We Recommend for Parents and Their Kids – Age of Learning Age of Learning
 
  • June 26, 11:00AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum: Fort from Home – Victorian Cooking; Let’s Get Saucy! 
 
 
Fort from Home Victorian Cooking is a monthly series that resents demonstrations of historical recipes, presents historical food research, and provides tips on how to adapt Victorian cooking to a modern kitchen. This month, Fort Interpreter Lawrence, aka Thornhill, will share his top receipts for Victorian era sauces. Bring your kitchen queries: Questions are encouraged throughout the session (via text chat)!  Visit Register Now to sign up.
Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Bulletin – 6/1/21

Barbara O’Neill – 6/6/21


Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. Barbara O’Neill, pictured in the 2001 cityscape, was a commanding presence in our area for many years. While operating a soul food restaurant on Fourth Avenue, she instituted a practice of providing free holiday meals for those in need. The tradition continued after her death, with the annual Barb’s Family and Friends program, led by her children and numerous volunteers and supporters. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/2001-2/

 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Barbara O’Neill – 6/6/21

Memorial Clinic – 5/23/21


Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1950 cityscape begins to include some of downtown Olympia’s iconic mid-Century architecture. The Memorial Clinic just east of the Fourth Avenue bridge, designed in 1948 by father-son team Joseph and Robert Wohleb, was an innovative concept at the time, grouping several physicians and specialties under one roof. The building was demolished in 2015.   Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1950-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Memorial Clinic – 5/23/21

Security Building – 5/16/21


Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The Security Building on Fourth Avenue, pictured in the 1933 cityscape, was Olympia’s first “skyscraper,” at five stories! The building features elaborate rosettes and pineapple motifs, a variety of rare stones, and mahogany woodwork throughout. Built on pilings that extended 60 feet deep, the building survived both the 1949 and the 2001 earthquakes. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1933-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Security Building – 5/16/21

Trolleys – 5/9/21


Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1899 cityscape shows one of Olympia’s five yellow trolleys proceeding southward on Main Street (now Capitol Way). The trolley system was electrified in 1892, with power supplied by the hydroelectric plant at Deschutes Falls. The system ran until 1933; a remnant exists in the form of a trolley pole at 11th and Capitol. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, https://olympiahistory.org/1899-2/

 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Trolleys – 5/9/21

First Congregational Church – 5/2/21


Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. Religious communities have always played an important role in the life of our residents. First Congregational church, pictured here at its first location on 9th and Capitol (out of view in the 1874 cityscape), was the fifth church to be organized in Olympia. The congregation still exists, part of the federated United Churches of Olympia. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on First Congregational Church – 5/2/21

Washington Center – 4/18/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The site of the Washington Center for the Performing Arts has been an entertainment mecca since the 1920s, beginning with the Liberty movie theater. As suburban multiplexes spelled the slow demise of downtown cinema venues, the city of Olympia teamed up with the state to develop the current entertainment complex. The cityscape for 2001 features the center as it appeared before its much-needed facelift in 2014. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/2001-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Washington Center – 4/18/21

Bulletin – 5/1/21

May 1, 2021      
 

The Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum is now selling a limited number of a wonderful book about local maritime heritage: Tugs and Other Hard-Working Vessels of Puget Sound:  A Scrapbook from the Earlier Days, by Olympia native and naval architect and marine engineer, the late Norman R.  Knutsen.  The book is being made available through the generosity of the Knutsen Family.  The softbound, 345 page book, is extensively illustrated, including many rare images of Olympia maritime history.  The book, with the net proceeds benefitting the Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum, is available by mail only with credit or debit card or PayPal account, and sells for $48.08 including postage, handling and sales tax.  To order your copy, click Here. Note that although this takes you to PayPal, a PayPal account not required for purchase!
 

 
__________________________________________________________________
 
Many Voices – A Resource Guide.
 
In response to the many requests Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum has received over the years for resources to study the local history of communities which have often been overlooked, we have put together an in depth collection of online materials focusing on such groups. Ranging from general information to sites focusing on communities of color, of Asian ancestry, Indigenous peoples and places, Latinx, Pacific Islanders, and the LGBTQ+, this work in progress is brimming with fascinating, enlightening information and research materials. These resources may be accessed at Here
 
___________________________________________________________________
 
Maritime Washington National Heritage Area.
 
Help chart a course for the Maritime Washington National Heritage Area! Spanning 3,000 miles of Washington State’s shoreline, this new heritage area will support our coastal communities in celebrating, maintaining, and sharing their water-based stories. Join the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation to navigate the seas ahead by identifying your favorite maritime places, taking a survey on the future of our saltwater shorelines, or attending a virtual workshop for Pierce & Thurston Counties on Thursday, April 29. Get involved and learn more at Preserve WA.
_______________________________________________________________
Statue of Nisqually Billy Frank Jr. going to the U.S. Capitol.

Governor Inslee just after signing the Billy Frank Jr. statue bill. Looking on, from left, were Nisqually Tribal Chairman Ken Choke, Lt. Gov. Denny Heck, state Rep. Debra Lekanoff and tribal councilman and son of Billy Frank Jr., Willie Frank III.

Governor Jay Inslee has signed HB 1372 – 2021-22, which will place a statue of Nisqually treaty rights advocate Billy Frank Jr. in the U.S. Capitol. Each state is allowed two statues in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall, Frank’s will replace an existing statue of Oregon Trail pioneer Marcus Whitman, which has stood in the Capitol for approximately 70 years. Billy Frank Jr. died in 2014 at the age of 83. In his younger years, he was a self-described “getting arrested guy” at treaty fishing rights protests, which eventually led to the Boldt Decision, a 1974 federal court case that reaffirmed tribal rights. In later decades, Frank became a widely admired advocate for Northwest salmon and natural resource protection. Inslee and other state officials were ushered into the school by Nisqually drummers and singers wearing hand-sewn regalia. Numerous relatives and descendants of Frank attended the signing ceremony and sat beneath a mounted, weathered dugout canoe paddled by their elder when he was young. “He’d be happy to see this,” said Willie Frank III, speaking of his father, at the bill signing ceremony. “But he’d also tell all of us up here on the stage that we’re not done. We’re a long ways from being done. We have a lot more work to do.” Inslee signed Democratic state Rep. Debra Lekanoff’s bill at the Wa He Lut Indian School on the banks of the Nisqually River near Olympia, near where the Frank family had once lived.
 
Washington state’s second presence in the Capitol statuary collection is a 1980 casting of Mother Joseph, a 19th century Catholic nun who was responsible for the construction of hospitals, schools and orphanages throughout the Northwest.

________________________________________________________________
  • May 4, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Gig Harbor History Museum Literary Society ZOOM event: Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer.
 
 
As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise”. Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings―asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass―offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return. This event is FREE and open to the public. For questions, please contact Cindy Hackett at cynthia.hale.hackett@gmail.com . ZOOM event information will be provided the weekend prior to the event, visit Here for more details.
 
  • May 8, 11:00 AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum: Fort from Home – Tinsmithing.
 
 
Join Fort Nisqually for a program on tinsmithing – learn about basic tools and techniques of 19th century tinsmithing and tin objects from Fort Nisqually Living History Museum’s collection. The program will include a demonstration of how tin cups were made by hand and how the process changed with the introduction of simple machines.
The Fort from Home series brings the talents and expertise of Fort Nisqually interpreters to audiences through live, interactive virtual programming. For more information and to register, visit Tickets.
 
  • May 11 6:00 PM. Lacey Museum – History Talks via ZOOM! A Snapshot in Time: Salmon, Historical Craft, and the Culvert Case.
 
Historian Joseph Taylor
 
Narratives about the past usually trace change over time, but legal proceedings insist on the opposite: the past is fixed in time and place. For historians, the demands are very different when writing for this standard. Contexts are narrow and specific. All that matters is the moment. What happened later is irrelevant. In this virtual event, historian Joseph Taylor will discuss how he addressed these demands while working as an expert witness in U.S. et al. v. Washington, commonly called the “Culvert Case.” He will explain the challenges of reconstructing ecological and cultural conditions at the time of the Stevens treaties in 1854 and 1855, as well as the implications of this form of history on how we understand our own times. To register for this free event, visit Here.
 
Joseph Taylor grew up in California and Oregon, and has worked in the area as a commercial fisherman and truck driver. A graduate of the University of Washington (1996), his primary fields of research in the last ten years have been in environmental history and the history of western North America. Taylor is currently a professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada.
 
  • May 13, 7:00PM – 9:30PM. Washington State Historical Society– Cooper.
 

D.B.Cooper, the hijacked plane and some recovered cash.
 
Alive or deceased? Disgruntled or ingenious? Folk hero or terrorist? This program explores the layers of myth and mystery surrounding the 1971 hijacking of Northwest Orient Flight 305 and the enigmatic figure at that story’s center. See material released by the FBI and hear harrowing first-hand accounts of crisis decision making from that Thanksgiving eve flight. Learn how to make D.B. Cooper’s favorite mixed drink, review fashions from the time period, and decide if you think a human could survive a mid-flight jettison from a Boeing 727 aft staircase. Included in your ticket purchase is a downloadable event kit with the cocktail recipe so you can prep the ingredients, as well as items to get you ready for other History After Hours activities! This event is limited to those 21 and over. For more information, visit Tickets.
 
  • May 15, 11:00 AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum: Fort from Home – The Beaver, Otter, and Fairy.
 
 
Join Fort Nisqually Interpreter, Tug, for a discussion on early steam navigation on the Puget Sound. Tug will share the history of three historic vessels, the Beaver, Otter, and Fairy and present his hand made model of the steamer Fairy and other artifacts. For more information and to register, visit Tickets.
 
  • May 20, 5:00PM – 6:45PM. Washington State Historical Society– South Sound Japanese American Day of Remembrance. Never Again: The story of the Japanese American incarceration.
 
 

A young girl imprisoned at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Hunt, Idaho during World War II. Courtesy Densho Digital Repository.
 
Join the WSHS online to see a performance of Never again: The story of the Japanese American incarceration, presented by Dukesbay Productions. The play features a collection of first-person stories of people who were forced into incarceration camps during World War II. Over the course of several scenes, five actors will bring this powerful history to life. Tacoma-based actor, producer, co-founder of Dukesbay Productions, and descendant of World War II incarceration Aya Hashiguchi Clark edited and directed the play. She researched and identified the stories of the individuals featured in this production through Densho, a grassroots organization dedicated to preserving, educating, and sharing the story of World War II-era incarceration of Japanese Americans. This program will be live streamed on Facebook, but you do not need a Facebook account to access it. The live program is viewable for everyone. Click  Here to see the program when it begins at 5 PM on May 20, 2021. For more information about this program and how to view, as well as suggestions for FREE! wifi, visit Here.
 
  • May 20, 7:00PM – 8:00PM. Washington State Historical Society– University of Washington Tacoma Scholarly Selections – Day of Remembrance. Never Again is Now: Japanese American Incarceration, Anti-Asian Violence, and Immigration Detention in the 21st Century.
 
Join WSHS for a panel discussion about the history and meaning of U.S. government surveillance of Japanese Americans and World War II incarceration, in the context of  contemporary issues of anti-Asian violence, immigration and labor, private detention centers, and border patrol. Informed by history, the panel will address relevant questions about democracy and civil liberties, neoliberal policies, citizenship, and American identity. Panelists will also consider the possibilities of solidarity between social justice movements for freedom and equality, including Black Lives Matter. Click Watch Here to see the program when it begins at 7 PM on May 20, 2021. For more information on connecting, as well as a full participants and their backgrounds, visit Here.
 
  • May 27, 11:00 AM. Gig Harbor History Museum Literary Society Virtualevent: .
 
 
Join David Williams, author of the new book Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound for an interview with Claire Keller-Scholz, Art, Culture, & Heritage Administrator at Metro Parks Tacoma and former Curator at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum. Williams research, including at the Museum’s archives and library, sheds new light on Fort Nisqually’s relationship to the Puget Sound. Homewaters weaves history and science into a fascinating and hopeful narrative, one that will introduce newcomers to the astonishing life that inhabits the Sound and offers longtime residents new insight into and appreciation of the waters they call home. Not far from Seattle skyscrapers live 150-year-old clams, more than 250 species of fish, and underwater kelp forests as complex as any terrestrial ecosystem. For millennia, vibrant Coast Salish communities have lived beside these waters dense with nutrient-rich foods, with cultures intertwined through exchanges across the waterways. Transformed by settlement and resource extraction, Puget Sound and its future health now depend on a better understanding of the region’s ecological complexities. Focusing on the area south of Port Townsend and between the Cascade and Olympic mountains, Williams uncovers human and natural histories in, on, and around the Sound. In conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, Williams traces how generations of humans have interacted with such species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. He sheds light on how warfare shaped development and how people have moved across this maritime highway, in canoes, the mosquito fleet, and today’s ferry system. The book also takes an unflinching look at how the Sound’s ecosystems have suffered from human behavior, including pollution, habitat destruction, and the effects of climate change. For more information and to register for this event, visit Tickets.
 
  • May 27, 7:30 PM. The Washington Center for the Performing Arts, Main Stage- Welcome to Indian Country.
 
Welcome to Indian Country features an all Native American cast who offer seven songs and seven stories about life, love, connecting to culture, survival and resilience. This show exemplifies the vibrant life of modern Native people as well as honors ancestors. In partnership with Indigenous Performance Productions, the Washington Center is providing technical theater support and regional partnership on the co-creation of Welcome to Indian Country. This effort is supported in part by grants from Washington Women’s Foundation, City of Olympia, and the Nisqually Indian Tribe. The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia. For more information visit Here, or contact 360-753-8586.
 
Posted in 2021 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 5/1/21

Governor Hotel – 4/11/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The 1972 cityscape pictures The Governor Hotel at the corner of 7th and Legion. The hotel has existed here since 1890, but in three different incarnations. The latest structure was built in 1970 in a mid-Century modern design by architectural firm Camp, Dresser, McKee. It is seen here during Pride Week 2014. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Governor Hotel – 4/11/21

Lower Main Street – 4/4/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In its early decades, as seen in the 1856 cityscape, Olympia’s commercial core was located in the few blocks north of State Avenue. In this photograph, taken much later, around 1902, we can still see remnants of the Bettman store, the balconied Washington Hotel, and the seat of the first territorial legislature beyond it (now the location of Chelsea Farms restaurant on Capitol Way north). Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1856-the-indian-war/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Lower Main Street – 4/4/21

Bulletin – 4/1/21

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Bulletin – 4/1/21

3/28/21 – Miller’s

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. The Miller’s Department Store building was erected at Legion Way and Capitol Way about 1949, around the time this photograph was taken. The building has housed a number of retail establishments throughout the years. Damage from the 2001 earthquake and other alterations have largely eliminated its original mid-Century modern architectural features. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1950-2/. Jeffers photo, 1949, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 3/28/21 – Miller’s

Washington Veneer – 3/21/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. With the completion of the Carlyon Fill in 1911, the port area of Olympia was able to accommodate dramatic industrial growth. The Washington Veneer Company was founded in 1924, joining the existing Olympia Veneer cooperative at the northern tip of the Port. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1933-2/.

unknown photographer and date, State Library photograph collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Washington Veneer – 3/21/21

3/14/21 – Sylvester Park with 7th Avenue “lid”

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. This photo, taken from the Old State Capitol building, shows Sylvester Park around the end of the 19th century. To the south of the park we see the planking of “the lid,” the predecessor of the 7th Avenue railroad tunnel. It was originally a trench dug along Seventh Avenue and capped by wooden planking. The trench was replaced by the current tunnel in 1913. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1899-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 3/14/21 – Sylvester Park with 7th Avenue “lid”

3/7/21 – Washington Standard

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. John Miller Murphy, prolific, opinionated, long-lived editor of the Washington Standard, came to Olympia with his sister in 1851 and published the Standard from 1860 until 1921. The Standard building was located on Third Avenue (now State Avenue). Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1874-building-a-railroad/.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 3/7/21 – Washington Standard

2/28/21 – Leschi

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. Leschi, a member of the Nisqually tribe, was designated a leader of the tribe in treaty negotiations after Washington gained territorial status, but refused to sign the Medicine Creek treaty, deeming it inadequate to preserve the Nisqually way of life. He was later judicially murdered for his role in the so-called Indian Wars of the 1850s, but posthumously exonerated in 2004. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information https://olympiahistory.org/1841-cheetwoot/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 2/28/21 – Leschi

2/21/21 – Procession of the Species

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In 1995, Earthbound Productions founder Eli Sterling spearheaded the Procession of the Species, an annual event commemorating Earth Day and the natural environment. The event features thousands of participants and spectators and involves months of preparation. This angler fish is a perennial favorite. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/2001-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 2/21/21 – Procession of the Species

2/14/21 – KGY

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. Radio station KGY is one of the oldest on the Pacific Coast, licensed in 1916. In 1960 it moved into a mid-Century modern building design by G. Stacey Bennett, at the far northern tip of the Port area. The 1972 Sylvester’s Window narrative describes the welcome voice of KGY’s long-time and beloved Dick Pust, announcing a snow day during the blizzard of January 1972. Both Dick and the station tower are visible in the cityscape for 1972. Dick has now (2021) retired from radio broadcasting and is working on a memoir. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1972-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 2/14/21 – KGY

2/7/2021- Centennial Parade

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In May 1950, Olympia held a week-long celebration of our city’s centennial. The Olympian put together a multi-page spread, residents dressed as pioneers, culminating with the Grand Centennial Parade of Progress. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1950-2/.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 2/7/2021- Centennial Parade

Bulletin – February 2021

February 1, 2021        

 

It’s Time to Renew, Join, Rejoin!

 

The annual membership drive for 2021 for Olympia Historical Society  & Bigelow House Museum is underway! Notices for renewals will be sent to current and past members and interested persons in the community via e-mail only this year. We always welcome new members as well! Your annual dues support the newsletter, the Thurston County History Journal, continued programming, operation of the Bigelow House Museum, our website, and our continuing work toward a local downtown history museum and history archive for public research.  As a small, all volunteer organization, your contributions have always been critical to our success. Please join, rejoin, or renew for 2021 now, via either the membership notice being sent to you, or CLICK HERE!

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Bigelow House Museum remains closed. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Museum, and due to cancellation of fundraising events, we are asking our friends to consider an extra donation this year. Please help support the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow Museum through our $25 for 25 Campaign! We recognize that economic fallout from the pandemic may make this difficult for some. However, please do consider a $25.00 donation, or whatever amount you can give, to help ensure the future of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Click DONATE to give $25 or any other amount to this campaign, either by credit card or with your PayPal account. Or you can mail us a check; go to our Get Involved page for more information. If you are not yet a member of the Society and Museum, please consider visiting our  Membership Page and joining now! And, while OHS&BHM fully supports area businesses, we realize that many are finding local shopping difficult in these trying times. If you are an Amazon customer, please consider donating to OHS&BHM through Amazon’s SMILE program. Information can be found at SMILE. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Information is available at the Get Involved link, above.

 
And mark your calendars for a special virtual presentation on February 21, 2021 at 1:30 pm. Dr. Thelma Jackson will present, The Presence of Blacks in Thurston County: 1950-1975. Dr. Jackson’s presentation in early 2020 was a standing-room only event at the Olympia Center, and you will not want to miss this follow-up. The Zoom link and other information will be sent ahead of the program. To receive the link, email olyhistory@gmail.com.
 

Dr. Thelma Jackson
_______________________________________________________________
 
Attorney General Sues to Save National Archives in Seattle.
 
Washington’s Attorney General Bob Ferguson, together with twenty-nine federally recognized tribes, Alaskan tribal entities, and tribal communities from Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska, as well as nine community organizations, historical preservation societies and museums and the state of Oregon, have filed a law suit against the federal government to stop the sale of the National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) building in Seattle. The building hosts exclusive and un-digitized tribal and treaty records, as well as Chinese Exclusion Act case files and records regarding the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The records are invaluable resources for researchers, historians and individuals seeking information about their family history or heritage. Tribal members use federal archive records to establish tribal membership, demonstrate and enforce tribal rights to fishing and other activities, trace their lineage and ancestry and access native school records. If these historical records are removed from the Pacific Northwest, many tribal members will be prevented from exercising these important rights. According NARA’s Seattle director, only “.001% of the facility’s 56,000 cubic feet of records are digitized and available online.” The archives house a significant collection of tribal and treaty records relating to the 272 federally recognized tribes in Alaska, Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The archives contain original drafts of tribal treaties and original copies of correspondence from treaty negotiations during the mid-19th century. The federal government did not consult with Northwest tribal leaders before deciding to move these significant pieces of tribal history thousands of miles away from the Northwest, depriving local tribes of access to these critical historical documents. The move to sell the building was initiated by the Public Records Reform Board, under Donald Trump. Visit the Washington Attorney General’s Office for additional information.

_______________________________________________________________


 

Washington State Historical Society has gathered some fun and engaging learning activities and lessons for your family to use at home, from coloring pages featuring Washington icons, to their new museum app, to podcasts and social studies curriculum!
 
Explore Washington History Online
 
Explore the Historical Society’s collections online by entering a type of object (baskets, for example) or a subject (logging, for example) and see what comes up!
 
Explore Using The New App
 
Explore exhibitions at the History Museum using the new app, WA State History Museum. It’s free to download from the app store for iPhones, and free to use the web app on Android smartphones or on computers.
 
Activity Sheets for the App
 
Ready to have fun and do activities while virtually visiting the museum? Download and print the activity sheets (below) to begin exploring an exhibition through the WA State History Museum app from the comfort of home!
 
Washington: My Home
Hope in Hard Times
Unforgiving Waters: Shipwrecks of the Pacific Northwest
The Not-So-Ordinary
 
History Lessons To Go
 
Do you want to learn more deeply and engage with new historical content? Try a “History Lesson To Go” as part of your distance learning! These lessons also connect with information on the WA State History Museum app.
 
CSI Lewis: The Mystery of Meriwether Lewis’ Death
Point of View Part 1: Understanding Treaties
Point of View Part 2: Using Art to Understand the Past
 
Stories of Pacific Northwest History from Columbia Magazine and Podcast
 
Find amazing articles about the rich history of the Pacific Northwest in the archives of the award-winning popular history magazine, COLUMBIA.
 
Listen to the Columbia Conversations Podcast, hosted by Feliks Banel , a producer, host, and historian for KIRO Radio, and editor of Columbia.  The podcasts  feature interviews with historians from around Washington and the Old Oregon Territory, plus historic sound files.
_______________________________________________________________
 
 The Washington State Legislature is in session, and History buffs should know about the Legislature’s Heritage Caucus, which meets regularly during the session to discuss heritage, arts, and other cultural and recreational issues. Organized in 1990, the Caucus is a bipartisan gathering of state legislators and other elected officials; staff from state heritage, arts, and cultural agencies, and nonprofit organizations; and citizens interested in supporting Washington’s cultural, heritage and the arts. Additional heritage related resources offered by the Legislature include workshops which provide training in the skills needed to operate small to medium-size museums and heritage organizations, conferences such as the Pacific Northwest History Conference, offered continuously since 1947, which brings together scholars, students, and the public to discuss and debate new perspectives on Northwest history. For more information on the Caucus, visit ARTSWA.
_______________________________________________________________
  • February  2, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Gig Harbor Literary Society ZOOM event: No – No Boy by John Okada. 
 

No-No Boy has the honor of being among the first of what has become an entire literary canon of Asian American literature,” writes novelist Ruth Ozeki in her new foreword. First published in 1957, No-No Boy was virtually ignored by a public eager to put World War II and the Japanese internment behind them. It was not until the mid-1970s that a new generation of Japanese American writers and scholars recognized the novel’s importance and popularized it as one of literature’s most powerful testaments to the Asian American experience.
 
No-No Boy tells the story of Ichiro Yamada, a fictional version of the real-life “no-no boys.” Yamada answered “no” twice in a compulsory government questionnaire as to whether he would serve in the armed forces and swear loyalty to the United States. Unwilling to pledge himself to the country that interned him and his family, Ichiro earns two years in prison and the hostility of his family and community when he returns home to Seattle. As Ozeki writes, Ichiro’s “obsessive, tormented” voice subverts Japanese postwar “model-minority” stereotypes, showing a fractured community and one man’s “threnody of guilt, rage, and blame as he tries to negotiate his reentry into a shattered world.” The first edition of No-No Boy since 1979 presents this important work to new generations of readers.
 
This event is FREE and open to the public. For questions, please contact Cindy Hackett at cynthia.hale.hackett@gmail.com . ZOOM event information will be provided the weekend prior to the event, visit Here for more information.

  • February 5, 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM. Lacey Timberland Library (Lacey). Virtual Event – People and Microbes on the Move: an Evening with Science Journalist and Author Sonia Shah.

Sonia Shah

Join the Lacey Timberland Library for an evening with prizewinning science journalist and author Sonia Shah. Sonia will be reading from her most recent book with a Q & A to follow. Sonia is the author of five nonfiction books, including the topical titles Pandemic: Tracking Contagions from Cholera to Coronaviruses and Beyond and The Next Great Migration: the Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move, published in 2020. Sonia’s writing explores the intersection of science, politics, and human rights. She has written for The New York Times, the Wall Street JournalScientific American, and the Nation; and has been featured and interviewed on RadiolabFresh AirDemocracy Now!, Senator Bernie Sanders’ Coronavirus roundtable, CNN with Fareed Zakaria, and TED Connects. Registration for this event closes February 5, visit HERE for more information.

  • February 10, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM. Timberland Regional Library. Virtual Event – Julia Butler Hansen: A Trailblazing Washington Politician. 

Julia Butler Hansen
 

Julia Butler Hansen was the second woman and first female Democrat elected to the U.S. Congress from Washington State. Undefeated in 41 consecutive elections, she retired in 1974. In her amazing career, Julia came to be known as The Duchess of CathlametThe Sage of Wahkiakum CountyThe Little Old Lady in Logging BootsMrs. Highways, or Madame Queen. Her name was recognizable enough that her campaign buttons eventually just said “Julia” in script, which is also how she was addressed by her constituents. Join Historian John Hughes to learn about her trailblazing career, spent championing issues like transportation, education, and women’s rights. Hughes’ presentation and biography examines the fascinating woman behind the nicknames. Historian John Hughes is the author of Julia Butler Hansen: A Trailblazing Washington Politician and Ahead of the Curve. For more information and to register, visit TRL Events.

  • February 11, 7:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Fort From Home Nightcap – 19th Century Birth Control.   

19th Century Birth Control Devices

Fort from Home brings the talents and expertise of Fort Nisqually historians to you live through interactive virtual programming!  Join the Fort for a Fort from Home Nightcap: 19th Century Birth control. Fort Interpreter Elizabeth will share her research on 19th century birth control, including types, availability, and conventions. Visit Register Now for more information and to sign up. Questions? Contact Event and Volunteer Coordinator Elizabeth Rudrud at elizabeth.rudrud@tacomaparks.com, or call 253.404.3970.

  • February 20, 11:00 AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Fort from Home for KIDS! – Crochet. 

Fort from Home for Kids is a kid-friendly program led by Fort Nisqually high school Apprentice Interpreters. Learn heritage skills at home! This month, Fort Nisqually Apprentice Interpreter Abigail teaches you the basics of crochet. Please have ready simple knitting supplies, including a crochet hook and yarn. Questions? Contact fortnisqually@tacomaparks.com. For more information and to register for this virtual event, visit Crochet.

  • February 22, 6:00 PM. Lacey Museum – History Talks via ZOOM! A People’s History of the Seven Inlets of the Southern Salish Sea.

The historical narrative of the Squaxin Island people is an ancient history from time immemorial and can be traced back to the recession of glaciers. They are the people of the seven inlets of Steh-Chass of Olympia, Noo-Seh-Chatl of Henderson Inlet, Squi-Aitl of Eld Inlet, Sawamish/T’Peeksin of Totten Inlet, Sa-Heh-Wa-Mish of Hammersley Inlet, S’Hotle-Ma-Mish of Carr Inlet, and Squaksin-wa-mish of Case Inlet. Their history is one of hospitality, medicine, longevity of life, regional trading networks and the birthplace of NW Tribal religious movement.  To register for this free vent, visit Seven Inlets.

  • February 25, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Washington State Historical Society  – Black History is Washington History – From Migration to Mark Making: George Bush, Jacob Lawrence, and the impact of Black Pioneers in Washington State.
 In 1972, the State of Washington invited artist Jacob Lawrence to create a work of significance about a central figure in Black history in Washington. He chose to paint five panels in gouache on paper representing a historical narrative about settler George Bush, a Black pioneer who, in 1844, co-founded the first permanent settlement in what is now Tumwater, after migrating from Missouri to escape the racism of the region. Jacob Lawrence was an internationally renowned painter who lived in Seattle and taught as an art professor at the University of Washington. Lawrence was also a member of the Washington State Arts Commission and was one of the first Black visual artists to focus on African American history as the subject matter of his art. The five-part work he created for this commission is highly regarded, and a significant part of the Washington State Historical Society’s collection. The WSHS also holds in its collections items from the late 1800s and early 1900s that belonged to the Bush family, along with photographs and negatives showing Bush family members, as well as letters and documents related to the work of George Bush JR., the state’s first Black legislator relating to land ownership for Black settlers. Join the Museum for a program about the rich and detailed paintings that comprise Lawrence’s work and the historical objects that help us understand the Bush legacy. Learn about the contributions of both of these men to Washington’s history.  This FREE! virtual event is taking place via Facebook Live @HistoryMuseum. For more information visit WSHM.
  • February 27, 11:00 AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Fort from Home – Victorian Cooking: Offal. 
The Fort from Home Victorian Cooking Series presents demonstrations of historical recipes and historical food research, and provides tips on how to adapt Victorian cooking to a modern kitchen. This month it is about all things offal, defined as the entrails and internal organs of an animal used as food, which are surprisingly nutritious, despite their name rhyming with “awful.” Fort Interpreter Lawrence, AKA Thornhill, will be using the organs harvested from last month’s Butchering and Curing workshop to demonstrate and discuss using animal organs in a Victorian kitchen. Questions? Contact fortnisqually@tacomaparks.com. For more information and to register for this virtual event, visit Offal.
_______________________________________________________________
Posted in 2021 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – February 2021

Little Hollywood – 1/31/21

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. A neighborhood known as Little Hollywood had existed for many years along the shores of the Deschutes Estuary (now Capitol Lake), but expanded during the Great Depression, as depicted in the cityscape for 1933. Buildings were a mixture of float houses, temporary structures known as shanties, and more permanent structures such as Zamberlin’s Market, pictured here. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1933-2/.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Little Hollywood – 1/31/21

Sue Lean

Sue Lean is an exhibit and event planner by profession. She serves as the Vice Chair of the Women’s History Consortium, an advisory board to the Washington State Historical Society.

She has created major exhibits on the Washington State Constitution of 1889, George
Washington as the state namesake, and the Washington State Supreme Court
She became interested in the Bigelow House Museum in 1996, and organized an event at the Capitol, with Shanna Stevenson, to commemorate the 125th anniversary of the first of three suffrage campaign visits by Susan B. Anthony to the Northwest.
A longtime member of the League of Women Voters of Thurston County, Sue has created
public events from pageants to parade entries for landmark anniversaries related to women winning the vote. For her efforts from the Magna Carta 800th celebration at the Temple of Justice in 2015 to the 2020 Centennial of the 19th Amendment, she received the DAR “Excellence in Community Service” Award.

Posted in Board Members | Comments Off on Sue Lean

Jean Wilkinson

Jean Wilkinson is a Puget Sound native. She was born and grew up in Bellingham, and moved to Tacoma to attend the University of Puget Sound where she earned a B.A. in History. After spending a year in Saarbrucken, Germany on a Fulbright Scholarship, Jean attended the University of Washington School of Law, attaining a J.D. in 1985. She moved to Thurston County in 1988.
Until her retirement in 2020 Jean served as an Assistant Attorney General for the state of Washington for 35 years. During her career, Jean immersed herself in Washington State government, providing legal representation to more than 20 state agencies in all three branches of government, and to two statewide elected officials. One of Jean’s favorite types of legal research involved trips to the Washington State Archives.

Jean’s introduction to Olympia area history was a 1989 Bigelow House tour led by Mary Ann Bigelow. Jean is a longtime member of Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, as well as the Washington State Historical Society. Jean’s favorite type of reading is history. On trips, she and her husband, Jim Fulton, enjoy spending long days at historical sites, taking tours and carefully reading interpretive materials. In becoming more involved with the society Jean looks forward to promoting local historical knowledge and events in the Thurston County Community.
Jean and Jim raised their two children in the Gull Harbor area of North Olympia and proudly sent them to Olympia public schools.

Posted in Board Members | Comments Off on Jean Wilkinson

Gery Gerst

Gery Gerst was born in Houston, Texas but moved to Seattle and attended grade school and high school there. After moving to Olympia, he graduated from St. Martin’s College with a Valedictorian degree in Education, History and Spanish, and earned a Master’s in Education from Western Washington University. He taught Social Studies at Olympia High School for 29 years and served as a leader in the teacher’s union 25 of those.

Upon retirement, he became an adjunct professor of education at St. Martin’s and served as president of the Education Division Advisory Board. He then spent 12 years as a professor in the Masters in Teaching program at TESC and helped write and bargain the teachers’ union contract there. He was awarded four Teacher of the Year awards from the Olympia School Board, Olympia Education Association, and OHS Student Body, as well as a Distinguished Educator Award from St. Martin’s. He was chosen as a “Distinguished Alum” by St. Martin’s in 2016. He has worked as a tour guide at the state capitol, designed and taught the Olympia region’s first Women’s Studies course, and designed the Olympia School District’s Bicentennial curriculum, as well as a civics curriculum for the State Capitol Visitor Center. His curriculum on voting was adopted by the Washington Secretary of State and other states. He is passionate about teaching and learning history left out of textbooks, especially the Herstory of women, and that of minority groups, and enjoys working with life-long learners.

Today he helps evaluate applications for scholarships for the D.A.R. Sacajawea Chapter, teaches U.S. History courses for adults in several areas (including the Electoral College, the Constitution, Women’s Her-story, and more). Besides enjoying reading and learning about local history, he also works for social justice causes, helps distribute items to area Latinos in need via the county food bank, works for political campaigns, and enjoys singing in the church choir.

Posted in Board Members | Comments Off on Gery Gerst

Sylvester Park – 1/25/2021

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. After the construction of the magnificent Thurston County Courthouse, now the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, the town commons was beautified into a public park with winding pathways, bandstand, and fountain. In the year of the 1899 cityscape, Olympia celebrated the last year of the century with a bicycle parade through the park. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1899-2/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Sylvester Park – 1/25/2021

Columbia Hall – 1/17/2021

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. Columbia Hall, pictured in the 1874 cityscape, was built in 1869 on 4th Avenue, near the center of downtown Olympia. It served a myriad of functions: fire station on the ground floor, city offices above, entertainment hall (it hosted the state’s first inaugural ball in 1889), police headquarters, courthouse, and theater. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society. For more information see https://olympiahistory.org/1874-building-a-railroad/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Columbia Hall – 1/17/2021

Konrad Schneider – 1/10/2021

Throughout 2021 we are featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In 1856, Olympia’s cofounder Edmund Sylvester was overseeing construction of his Italianate mansion, located just south of the town common now named after him. A German immigrant, Konrad Schneider, was responsible for much of the home’s construction. Schneider had just returned to Olympia after building the New Dungeness lighthouse outside of Sequim. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1856-the-indian-war/

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Konrad Schneider – 1/10/2021

Charles Wilkes – 1/3/2021

Throughout 2021 we will be featuring events and people from the Sylvester’s Window cityscape project, now available online. In 1838, an American naval officer, Charles Wilkes, was given command of an expedition to explore the Pacific Ocean and document its shores and islands. Wilkes reached the southern end of Puget Sound in July 1841. He and his crew were among the first Americans to set foot at what is now Olympia.   Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society. For more information, see https://olympiahistory.org/1841-cheetwoot/.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Charles Wilkes – 1/3/2021

Bulletin – 12/31/2020

January 1, 2021     
Our Annual Meeting Approaches!
 
Olympia Historical Society  & Bigelow House Museum will hold its virtual Annual Meeting on Saturday, January 23, 2021 at 1:30 pm. The program will highlight the 90th anniversary of the Thurston County Courthouse, built in 1930. A distinguished panel will discuss the history of the courthouse from a first-hand perspective along with the successful efforts to preserve the building. The annual business meeting will follow the program and will include board elections. Members will be sent an invitation prior to the meeting.  If others wish to attend the program, e-mail olyhistory@gmail.com by January 21 at 5:00 pm to receive the meeting link.
 
It’s Time to Renew, Join, Rejoin!
The annual membership drive for 2021 for Olympia Historical Society  & Bigelow House Museum is underway! Notices for renewals will be sent to current and past members and interested persons in the community via e-mail only this year. We always welcome new members as well! Your annual dues support the newsletter, the Thurston County History Journal, continued programming, operation of the Bigelow House Museum, our website, and our continuing work toward a local downtown history museum and history archive for public research.  As a small, all volunteer organization, your contributions have always been critical to our success. Please join, rejoin, or renew for 2021 now, via either the membership notice being sent to you, or CLICK HERE!
 
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Bigelow House Museum remains closed. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Museum, and due to cancellation of fundraising events, we are asking our friends to consider an extra donation this year. Please help support the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow Museum through our $25 for 25 Campaign! We recognize that economic fallout from the pandemic may make this difficult for some. However, please do consider a $25.00 donation, or whatever amount you can give, to help ensure the future of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Click DONATE to give $25 or any other amount to this campaign, either by credit card or with your PayPal account. Or you can mail us a check; go to our Get Involved page for more information. If you are not yet a member of the Society and Museum, please consider visiting our  Membership Page and joining now! And, while OHS&BHM fully supports area businesses, we realize that many are finding local shopping difficult in these trying times. If you are an Amazon customer, please consider donating to OHS&BHM through Amazon’s SMILE program. Information can be found at SMILE. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Information is available at the Get Involved link, above.
 

THANK YOU!!!


 

The Washington State History Museum in Olympia is hosting an exhibit titled Votes for Women – 100 Years and Counting through the 17th of January, see the listing below for more details. And, to mark 100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment gave most women the right to vote, The Washington State Historical Society, Women’s Commission and Women’s History Consortium are teaming up to lead statewide programs and to represent Washington in nationwide initiatives. Check out the Votes for Women website for all the great connections to curriculum, activities across our state, downloads and more!
______________________________________________________________
  • January 1 thru 17. Washington State Historical Society Exhibit  – Votes for Women – 100 Years and Counting.

This exhibition will greet visitors a few weeks after the History Museum is able to reopen. NOTE: Dates may change. Please check the WSHM website before visiting.
 
Washington women led the way! The Washington State Historical Society’s exhibition, Votes for Women: 100 Years and Counting, is an intriguing look at the history of the women’s suffrage movement. Focusing on both the national story and our state’s story, this exhibition explains how Washington women contributed to the eventual ratification of the 19th Amendment. Votes for Women is a vibrant celebration of female achievements in politics and society.
This exhibition invites visitors to learn by turning the galleries into an immersive game focused on women and voting rights. Learn the who, what, where, why and why not of Washington’s suffrage battle. Find out who could legally cast a ballot and who could not during the history of the on-again-off-again vote for women. Journey through an interactive timeline, voting at key spots along the way, to understand the importance of voting to our society and how women’s suffrage has impacted and affected our nation over time. You’ll come out knowing the names of those  who fought for this basic constitutional right, and you’ll appreciate your right to vote as never before!  The curators of this exhibition, Chandler O’Leary and Jessica Spring, are the authors and artists behind the book Dead Feminists: Historic Heroines in Living Color. Votes for Women will be richly illustrated with work created by O’Leary and Spring exclusively for this exhibition as well as historic objects and ephemera from the Washington State Historical Society collections. The Washington State History Museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma.

  • January  5, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Gig Harbor Literary Society ZOOM event: The Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison.   

For Mike Muñoz, a young Chicano living in Washington State, life has been a whole lot of waiting for something to happen. Not too many years out of high school and still doing menial work—and just fired from his latest gig as a lawn boy on a landscaping crew—he knows that he’s got to be the one to shake things up if he’s ever going to change his life. But how? In this funny, angry, touching, and ultimately deeply inspiring novel, bestselling author Jonathan Evison takes the reader into the heart and mind of a young man on a journey to discover himself, a search to find the secret to achieving the American dream of happiness and prosperity. That’s the birthright for all Americans, isn’t it? If so, then what is Mike Muñoz’s problem? Though he tries time and again to get his foot on the first rung of that ladder to success, he can’t seem to get a break. But then things start to change for Mike, and after a raucous, jarring, and challenging trip, he finds he can finally see the future and his place in it. And it’s looking really good. Lawn Boy is an important, entertaining, and completely winning novel about social class distinctions, about overcoming cultural discrimination, and about standing up for oneself. This event is FREE and open to the public. For questions, please contact Cindy Hackett at cynthia.hale.hackett@gmail.com . ZOOM event information will be posted the weekend prior to the event, visit Here for more information.

  • January  5, 7:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Fort From Home – Moving Fort Nisqually.   

Fort from Home brings the talents and expertise of Fort Nisqually historians to you live through interactive virtual programming.  Fort Nisqually was originally established by the Hudson’s Bay Company on the traditional lands of the Nisqually people. Today, it is located on the traditional lands of the Puyallup people. Fort Nisqually was reconstructed at Point Defiance Park during the Great Depression. As millions faced unemployment, the project employed 200 young men at $30/month. Housed, fed, and clothed (in WWI surplus uniforms) by the Civilian Conservation Corps, most of the earnings were sent home to family. Join Fort historian Jerry Eckrom to learn the story behind this move. Questions? Contact Event and Volunteer Coordinator Elizabeth Rudrud at elizabeth.rudrud@tacomaparks.com, or call 253.404.3970. Register here.

  • January 9, 10:00 AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Heritage Skills Workshop – Butchering and Curing Workshop.   

Heritage Skills Workshops preserve traditional skills through instruction, demonstration, and experiential learning. This workshop will demonstrate seam butchery, using only knives and cleavers. Learn about nitrate free whole muscle curing and basic cooking methods. Registration deadline: January 2, 2021. Questions? Contact us a fortnisqually@tacomaparks.com. Register Here.  Fort Nisqually is located at 5519 Five Mile Dr., Tacoma. Video recording of session will be available.

  • January 9, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Public Library (Tacoma): Tacoma Reads ZOOM Event: A Conversation with Marcelo Hernandez Castillo Hosted by Mayor Woodards.   

Join Tacoma Public Library and Mayor Woodards for a keynote Tacoma Reads event, a conversation with the author of Children of the Land, an unforgettable memoir from a prize-winning poet Marcelo Hernandez Castillo about growing up undocumented in the United States. Castillo is a poet, essayist, translator, and immigration advocate. His memoir Children of the Land (Harper Collins, 2020) is his most recent publication and explores the ideas of separation from deportation, trauma, and mobility between borders. The novel recounts the sorrows and joys of a family torn apart by draconian policies and chronicles one young man’s attempt to build a future in a nation that denies his existence. Registration for this event will open on Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2020. A discussion with Marcelo Hernandez Castillo and City of Tacoma Mayor Woodards will be followed with a moderated Q&A. The event will be hosted on ZOOM.
 
Castillo was born in Zacatecas, Mexico and immigrated at the age of five with his family to the California central valley. As an AB540 student, he earned his B.A. from Sacramento State University and was the first undocumented student to graduate from the Helen Zell Writers Program at the University of Michigan. His immigration case was used by the Supreme Court to justify the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) under president Obama. Castillo is a founding member of the Undocupoets Campaign which successfully eliminated citizenship requirements from all major first poetry book prizes in this country and was recognized with the Barnes and Noble Writers for Writers award from Poets & Writers Magazine. Through a literary partnership with Amazon Publishing, he has helped to establish The Undocupoet Fellowship which provides funding to help curb the cost of submissions to journals and contests.  Registration is now open for this event.

  • January 14, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM. Tacoma Public Library (Tacoma): ZOOM Event – Tense Transitions of Presidential Power.   

Our nation is in the midst of one of the most unusual transitions of presidential power, as the sitting president refuses to concede, is filing multiple lawsuits claiming widespread voter fraud, and attempting to influence what electors are selected in key states for the Electoral College. Has this ever happened before? Not exactly like this, but there have been some very tense and uncertain transfers of presidential power. Join this ZOOM event in which presidential historian Mike Purdy will unpack some other tense interregnums, the term sometimes used to describe the time from election day to inauguration day. Mr. Purdy will also comment on how our current situation is different and similar to previous transitions from one president to another.
 
Registration is required for this program, visit HERE for more information and to register.
 
Mike Purdy is a Seattle-based presidential historian who writes at PresidentialHistory.com  which includes a blog, video, and resources about the presidents. He is the author of the well-received book 101 Presidential Insults: What They Really Thought About Each Other – and What It Means to Us. He is a frequent speaker on issues of presidential history and presidential campaigns, and has been quoted and interviewed by the media including the Associated Press, CNN, The Wall Street JournalUSA Today, C-SPAN, Reuters, Reader’s Digest, BBC, KBTC, Tacoma News Tribune, and other national and international media. He graduated from the University of Puget Sound with both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business administration.

  • January 18, 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Washington State Historical Society  – Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with FREE online performances and activities! 

The Washington State Historical Society is joining community partners to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a range of ONLINE activities via Facebook Live and ZOOM. Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy and explore how history connects us all.  This event will include online theater performances with Tacoma Arts Live, with an opportunity for questions and answers with the performers and director, including Get on the Bus at 11:00 AM and Ruby Bridges at 1:00 PM. There will also be poetry writing activities led by Write253, inspired by Civil Rights era poetry, art making guided by arts educator Valencia Carroll, and downloadable online exhibitions from Washington State History Museum about Dr. King’s visit to Washington and the Tacoma Civil Rights Movement. Details are still in flux, visit MLK Event for up to date information.

  • January 18, 6:00 PM. Lacey Museum – History Talks via ZOOM! Using DNA to Trace Your Ancestry.  

DNA testing for genealogy is becoming more popular and common. Learn about the different types of DNA testing available in this online presentation in which the speaker will describe how she used her DNA results to discover the true identity of her great grandfather. Find out what you may learn when you use genetic genealogy as part of your family history research! To register for this free, online event, visit DNA.

  • January 19, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM. Tacoma Public Library (Tacoma): ZOOM Event – Tacoma Reads: Book Discussion of Dear America – The Story of an Undocumented CitizenYoung Readers Edition by Jose Antonio Vargas.  

Vargas… considers what it means to be American and how it feels when you are considered alien in your own home. – Library Journal
 
Jose Antonio Vargas was only twelve years old when he was brought to the United States from the Philippines to live with his grandparents. He didn’t know it, but he was sent to the U.S. illegally. In this young readers’ adaptation of his adult memoir Dear America, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and undocumented immigrant Jose Antonio Vargas tells his story, in light of the 12 million undocumented immigrants currently in the United States. Join Tacoma Public Library for a virtual book discussion of the Tacoma Reads 2020 selection for young readers, Dear America: The Story of An Undocumented Citizen; Young Readers Edition. Aimed at ages 13 to 24.  Registration is required.

  • January  19, 6:00 PM. University of Puget Sound ZOOM Event – 35th Annual Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration.

All are invited to attend the University of Puget Sound’s 35th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration! The program will include messages from various Puget Sound community members and a keynote address featuring multi-genre writer, educator, and interdisciplinary artist, Anastacia-Reneé. No stranger to the Sound, she served as the Seattle Civic Poet from 2017-2019. For more information on Anastacia-Reneé and the scope of her work, please visit: http://www.anastacia-renee.com/. This event is free and open to the public, ZOOM Meeting ID: 939 5937 6766. For more information, visit Here.

  • January 21, 6:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society ZOOM Event – Earthwise & Second Choice: Salvage Stories. 

Tacoma Historical Society co-sponsors the Virtual Heritage Cafe: Broadening Horizons in Historic Preservation with the City of Tacoma Historic Preservation Office and Historic Tacoma. Join the Society for a ZOOM event featuring Aaron Blanchard of Earthwise Architectural Salvage and Amanda Harryman of Second Use Building Materials, as they share stories from their work in architectural salvage. A ZOOM link will be posted as the date approaches, click Here for more information.

  • January 23, 11:00 AM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Fort From Home for Kids – Cardboard Weaving. 

Fort from Home brings the talents and expertise of Fort Nisqually interpreters to you live through interactive virtual programming.  In this program, Fort Nisqually Apprentice Interpreter Kessa teaches you to make your own cardboard loom and learn to weave mini (very mini) blankets. Register here. Fort from Home for Kids is a kid-friendly program led by Fort Nisqually high school Apprentice Interpreters. Learn about their high school program here. Questions? Contact Event and Volunteer Coordinator Elizabeth Rudrud at elizabeth.rudrud@tacomaparks.com, or call 253.404.3970.

  • January 28, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Washington State Historical Society  – Challenging History: Racism and City Development’s Impact on Washington’s Health Today.

Decisions made decades ago can significantly impact the everyday lives of people today. Join Dr. Tomas A. Madrigal, Equity and Social Justice Consultant and Rad Cunningham, Manager of the Climate Change and Health section at Washington State Department of Health for an online event taking a look back at policy decisions around transportation and housing in minority communities and how they continue to impact Washingtonians’ health. They will also look into the future to explore if the health impacts on minority communities can be rectified through more thoughtful infrastructure planning around autonomous vehicles. This FREE! virtual event is taking place via Facebook Live @HistoryMuseum
 

Posted in 2021 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 12/31/2020

Admittance Day – 12/27/2020

In this image from November 1939, a group of Cub Scouts participates in a parade celebrating the Golden Anniversary of Washington’s admittance as a state into the Union.  The float, though, commemorates an earlier occasion, namely the arrival of the first U.S. citizen settlers over the Oregon Trail. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Richards Studio, 1939, courtesy Tacoma Public Library

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Admittance Day – 12/27/2020

GP Tester – 12/20/2020

Manufacturing giant Georgia Pacific took over the Washington Veneer plywood plant in Olympia and built its headquarters in the Port area, a building noted for its modern architecture demonstrating the versatile uses of plywood. In this photograph from 1955, a tester at the headquarters analyzes the strength of plywood. The building is now occupied by the State Department of Fish and Wildlife, and is on the National Register.   Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. Richards Studio, 1955, courtesy Tacoma Public Library

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on GP Tester – 12/20/2020

Ron Dodge – 12/13/2020

Olympia native Ron Dodge was a 19 year old up-and-coming baseball player for Tacoma’s Cheney Studs when this photograph was taken of him in 1955. After playing for several different baseball teams, Ron signed up as a pilot with the U.S. Navy, and was sent to Vietnam, where he was shot down and held as a prisoner of war. His remains were finally returned home in 1981. Ron’s cousin John Dodge was a longtime reporter for the Olympian. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society.

Richards Studio, 1955, courtesy  Tacoma Public Library

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Ron Dodge – 12/13/2020

Ken Balsley – 12/6/2020

A young Ken Balsley poses for his photograph, accompanying an article from 1971 that identified him as a student representative to The Evergreen State College Board of Trustees. Ken has remained in the Olympia area, as an influential journalist, broadcaster, commentator, and political activist. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, August 1971, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Ken Balsley – 12/6/2020

Land Office – 11/29/2020

Throughout much of the 19th century, citizens were entitled to claim acreage under a series of federal laws designed to encourage Americans to settle in Western territories and states. As the population of the West grew rapidly in the 1870s and 1880s, United States Land Offices were established to process land claims. A group of early settlers poses here outside the Land Office in downtown Olympia. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Unidentified photographer, around 1880, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Land Office – 11/29/2020

Vote for Olympia poster – 11/22/2020

When Washington achieved statehood in 1889, it was by no means a foregone conclusion that Olympia would remain the capital of the new state. A concerted campaign featuring posters like this one, and “bribes” in the form of local restaurateur Woodbury Doane’s famous pan-roasted oysters, helped Olympia retain its status over contenders Ellensburg and North Yakima. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Poster, 1889, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Vote for Olympia poster – 11/22/2020

Oxen team at Bordeaux – 11/15/2020

The Bordeaux logging community was established in the 1880s by French Canadian-born Thomas Bordeaux. Before the advent of a logging railroad, teams of oxen laboriously pulled the huge logs along makeshift corduroy roads. This photograph of one such team is said to be the model for the oxen team depicted in bronze on the doors of the Legislative Building.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Unknown photographer, 1880s, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Oxen team at Bordeaux – 11/15/2020

Diamond Jubilee Cake – 11/8/2020

Washington State celebrated its Diamond Jubilee (75th anniversary) in November 1964 with a 600 pound cake. Although there had been concerns that the cake would not fit inside the doors of the Legislative Building, it survived the journey, accompanied by sisters Christy, Gayle, and Sarah Conger, of Olympia. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, November 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Diamond Jubilee Cake – 11/8/2020

Olympia High School football team of 1909 – 10/25/2020

The Olympia High School football team of 1909 included the children of many of Olympia’s most prominent citizens. The sweaters, emblazoned with a capital “O,” were made at Olympia Knitting Mills, then in its infancy. Eventually the company grew to become a large operation that shipped knitted sportswear as far away as China. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Unidentified photographer, 1909, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Olympia High School football team of 1909 – 10/25/2020

Hays children at Governor’s Mansion – 10/18/2020

It may surprise some that there was no Washington State-owned Governor’s Mansion until 1909. The current mansion on Capitol Campus was first occupied by Governor Marion Hay and his family. In this photograph, taken around that time, two of the governor’s seven children pose on the mansion grounds with a member of the Mansion staff. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. Unknown photographer, about 1911, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Hays children at Governor’s Mansion – 10/18/2020

Donald Anthony White demonstration – 10/11/2020

Donald Anthony White, a young Black man, was sentenced to death after being convicted of murder. Protesters against the death penalty, including folk singer Joan Baez, convened on the steps of the Legislative Building in 1964, seeking clemency for White, who had been diagnosed as schizophrenic. He was granted a new trial and his sentence commuted to life in prison. He later graduated from high school and college while in prison. White’s story galvanized the nationwide anti-death penalty movement. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.  Unknown photographer, 1964, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Donald Anthony White demonstration – 10/11/2020

Franklin Roosevelt in Olympia – 10/4/2020

On October 1, 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt went on a whirlwind tour of the Olympic Peninsula, and then stopped for a few minutes in Olympia. Rain throughout the day had forced him to tour in a closed-top car for most of the trip, but he quickly changed to an open car just before he reached the capital, accompanied by a rainbow and a throng of spectators. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. Merle Junk photo, 1937, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Franklin Roosevelt in Olympia – 10/4/2020

Velodrome – 9/27/2020

Bicycles and bicycle racing were immensely popular at the turn of the 20th century. A velodrome (bicycle racing arena) was constructed near the current site of Olympia High School, and races were held weekly. In this photo from around 1900, the contenders race by in a blur while spectators, many bearing umbrellas, fill the stands. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

W.A. Van Epps photo, about 1900, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Velodrome – 9/27/2020

Olympia Cafe – 9/20/2020

In 1914, photographer Robert Esterley took a series of photographs documenting downtown businesses, their owners, and staff. Shown here is The Olympia Cafe at 116 4th Avenue. It was owned by John Baretich. In the 1930s he hired architect Joseph Wohleb to design an art moderne-style building for the same location. The Baretich building is currently the home of the Danang Restaurant. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. Robert Esterley photo, 1914, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Olympia Cafe – 9/20/2020

Olympia Brewing Company poster – 9/16/2020

Leopold Schmidt began brewing beer in 1896 at the foot of Tumwater Falls. By 1906 he had built the large complex seen in this advertising poster. The Old Brewhouse building, still in existence, takes center stage; beyond it we can see the Schmidt Mansion on the hillside, but most other structures in the image were obliterated when I-5 came through in the 1960s. Image  selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Advertising poster, early 1900s, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Olympia Brewing Company poster – 9/16/2020

Sky River II – 9/6/2020

In 1969, the second annual Sky River Rock Festival took place in Tenino over Labor Day weekend. (The first Sky River was in Snohomish County.) Held over the objections of local residents, the festival lineup included James CottonCountry Joe and the FishFlying Burrito BrothersBuddy GuyDan Hicks and His Hot Licks, among others. Daily Olympian staff were on hand to document the three-day long event. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1969, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Sky River II – 9/6/2020

Burmeister Saloon – 7/26/2020

In 1853, Charles Burmeister established one of the earliest saloons in Olympia. It was located on Fourth Avenue and Washington Street, where the State Theater is now. This photograph from the 1860s shows Burmeister, his wife, and others in front of the saloon. The building was later moved further west on Fourth Avenue but succumbed to the extension of downtown’s masonry buildings in the early 1900s. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Unknown photographer, 1860s, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Burmeister Saloon – 7/26/2020

Mary O’Neil – 8/16/2020

Mary O’Neil was one of the earliest territorial schoolteachers, arriving in Olympia in 1863. In 1910, several of her former students gathered to honor her, posing here on the steps of the State Capitol Building (now Office of Superintendant of Public Instruction). Miss O’Neil is in the center of the front row. Many of her students came to be prominent civic leaders. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Unknown photographer, 1910, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Mary O’Neil – 8/16/2020

Bulletin – 9/1/2020

September 1, 2020     
 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY!

 
September 2020 marks 25 years since the official opening of the Bigelow House Museum. Please help support the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow Museum through our $25 for 25 Campaign! We had planned a special event, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic that won’t be happening, as the Bigelow House Museum is closed for the foreseeable future. In addition, we have had to make the difficult decision to cancel our biggest fundraiser, the annual Holiday Tour of Homes. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Museum, and due to cancellation of fundraising events, we are asking our friends to consider an extra donation this year. We recognize that economic fallout from the pandemic may make this difficult for some. However, please do consider a $25.00 donation, or whatever amount you can give, to help ensure the future of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Click DONATE to give $25 or any other amount to this campaign, either by credit card or with your PayPal account. Or you can mail us a check; go to our Get Involved page for more information. If you are not yet a member of the Society and Museum, please consider visiting our  Membership Page and joining now! And, while OHS&BHM fully supports area businesses, we realize that many are finding local shopping difficult in these trying times. If you are an Amazon customer, please consider donating to OHS&BHM through Amazon’s SMILE program. Information can be found at SMILE. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Information is available at the Get Involved link, above.
 

THANK YOU!!!

 
Sylvester’s Window is a nonprofit, educational project that teaches local history through a series of cityscapes created by artist Robert Chamberlain, all drawn from the same perspective: the tower window of Edmund Sylvester’s home in Downtown Olympia. Growing up in Tenino, Chamberlain was drawn to art from an early age, stating in an interview “As a kid in school, I drew pictures instead of doing my class work.” His art appears across Washington, from office walls to coffee mugs. Sylvester’s Window, created between 2000 and 2004, is considered to be Chamberlain’s most significant work. By arrangement with the creator of the project, Lynn Erickson, the Olympia Historical Society and  Bigelow House Museum has posted the eight cityscapes, as well as extensive educational materials and research on our website. The materials are fully word-searchable and a rich source of information about Olympia’s history. The reproductions and materials are made possible by special arrangement with Ms. Erickson. Launch your visit here: Sylvester’s Window.  Originals are displayed at the Olympia branch of Timberland Library. Please respect copyrights; for permission to use any and all materials from this project, contact OHS&BHM at olyhistory@gmail.com.
 
While COVID-19 appears to be plateauing in some areas of Washington, many sites remain closed, and it’s a good idea to CALL BEFORE GOING. Remaining home whenever possible continues to be the best course of action to limit the spread in the Evergreen State. If you need a little inspiration for that during these trying times, give a listen to this prescient tune by British singer songwriter Richard Thompson, from nearly thirty years ago  Keep Your Distance. Click the arrow on that page to play.
 

______________________________________________________________

 

  • Washington State Historical Society’s New Head of Collections Asks That You Help Document COVID-19 in the Evergreen State.

Margaret Wetherbee hit the ground running at the Washington State Historical Society, joining the organization days after its buildings closed due to COVID-19 safety protocols. A fifth-generation Washingtonian, her passion for the stories of the Evergreen State began at a young age. Wetherbee has worked as a collections professional at the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum in Tacoma, the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, the Riverside Metropolitan Museum in Riverside, CA and others.  “I’m reaching out to citizens across the state to ask for their participation in documenting this historic event for the Historical Society’s collections. We want to capture what you’re going through right now as it unfolds, because this is an extraordinary time in our history. We will continue to collect as we experience the impacts over the coming years.” Washington’s coronavirus history will be notable as one of the first pandemic hot spots in the United States. The Historical Society’s director, Jennifer Kilmer, remarked, “Future Washingtonians will research these days, asking how we coped with the suddenly vacated office buildings, curtailed services, and medical supply shortages. They’ll want to know how this event impacted our lives on a personal level. Just as we are now looking to the 1918 flu epidemic for insight into our present experience, folks in the future will want to know about our Stay Home/Stay Healthy protocol, and how we managed to come together to help one another.” The Historical Society is asking for digital content including (but not limited to) photographs, audio and video clips, screenshots of social media memes or posts, reports, correspondence, observations and anecdotes. The Historical Society would also like physical objects and ephemera (homemade masks, coronavirus closure notices, decals, diaries, letters, etc.) but asks that you gather and save objects until their Research Center reopens. For details, visit Collecting the COVID-19 Experience .
 

  • Washington State History Museum – IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition, Northwest Native Festival and Virtual Arts Market. 

IN THE SPIRIT is an annual celebration of diverse Native arts and culture. This event traditionally honors the artists whose work has been selected for the IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition, which was unable to be exhibited this year in-museum due to COVID-19, but you can view the Virtual Exhibition online. There will also be an IN THE SPIRIT Virtual Arts Marketplace featuring talented emerging artists and your favorite vendors who normally sell their creations during the festival, which will go live on September 10. Visit In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts for details and schedule.
 

  • September 5. South Sound Maritime Heritage Association – Scaled-Down, Virtual Olympia Harbor Days Event.   

In 1974, the tugboats and crews of the Puget Sound returned to the beautiful waterfront of Olympia to celebrate the end of the summer season. This gathering was the start of Olympia Harbor Days, an annual FREE family festival dedicated to the community as a celebration of maritime heritage. In 1978 , Harbor Fair, an arts, crafts, food and music festival, was added. Today, Olympia Harbor Days is the third largest festival in Thurston County and home of the World’s Largest Vintage Tugboat Races, attracting over 55,000 visitors annually, featuring 300+ booths, ships, activities, music and food. Touring the tugboats and watching them race remains the highlight of the festival, something “kids” young and old never seem to grow tired of. Due to COVID-19, this year’s event will be LITE, with virtual content ranging from self guided tours along the Percival Landing Boardwalk to an instructional video on creating tugboats out of LEGO! For more information, visit Olympia Harbor Days.
 

  • September 10. Nisqually Health Department 2nd Annual Walk for Hope, Life is Precious Suicide Prevention Event.   

COVID-19 has profound impacts beyond the physical. Social isolation, anxiety, fear of contagion, uncertainty, chronic stress and economic difficulties may lead to the development or worsening of depressive, anxiety, substance use and other psychiatric disorders, including suicide. Addressing the issue of suicide has never been more timely. Visit Suicide Prevention for more information about this virtual event.
 

  • September 14, 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society September Virtual Meeting.

Join THS for their September virtual meeting, which will be shared as a live broadcast on both Youtube  and Facebook at 7 PM on Monday, September 14. The featured speaker will be board president Bill Baarsma, who will share some of his extensive research into Tacoma’s political history with the presentation: The Great Tacoma Recall Election of September 15, 1970, and How it Transformed Tacoma Politics. The meeting will also include the presentation of Tacoma Historical Society’s annual awards, recognizing significant contributions to Tacoma history in a variety of areas. Be sure to tune in to be the first to learn who will be presented with our Murray Morgan Award, Alan C. Liddle Award, and Ronald E. Magden Award!
 

  • September 17, 8:00 AM to September 19, 7:00 PM. Harbor History Museum – History Rocks! Online Auction.  

Join the Museum on Saturday, September 19th, at 6:30 PM for a live stream of their auction program, complete with bidding opportunities and a look at the past 10 years and a peek at what’s to come in the next decade! The auction is the Museum’s biggest fundraiser of the year,  and it needs your support during these challenging times. Today’s stories are the history of tomorrow and the funds raised during History Rocks will help maintain these legacies for the future.  Contributions during History Rocks help to support student educational outreach through the Midway School Program, new virtual programming for students who cannot attend programs in residence, the restoration of the Shenandoah, and the documentation and preservation of our communities’ rich and dynamic stories. This event is FREE and open to the public. For questions, please contact Robin Harrison, Operations and Marketing Manager, at operations@harborhistorymuseum.org. You may Click Here to register.
 

  • September 21, 6:00 PM. Lacey Museum – History Talks! Washington Suffragists: Ahead of Their Time.  

Although 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the federal 19th amendment giving women the right to vote, Washington women won the vote a decade earlier in 1910. Well-known local historian Shanna Stevenson will discuss the history of suffrage in Washington State. Her presentation will include the fascinating tale of local women who played a major role in the movement as well as the pioneering women who were political leaders of Thurston County. This VIRTUAL EVENT will take place Via ZOOM. To register for this free online event, visit Lacey Museum Webinar
 

  • September 25 – 27, 1:00, 5:00 & 7:00 PM. Nisqually Indian Tribe – Annual Wellbriety Pow-Wow.   

Join the Nisqually Nation for their 20th Annual Wellbriety Pow-Wow! This event is open to  Nisqually tribal members, the tribal community and the general public.

Event dates and times include:
           25th: Coastal Jam 5 PM.
           26th: Grand Entry 1 PM & 7 PM.
           27th: Grand Entry 1 PM.
Where: Nisqually Youth and Community Center
Master of Ceremonies: Sonny Eaglespeaker & Casey Wallahee
Arena Director: Buchanan Wallahee
Host Drum: Creekside
Head Man Dancer: Melvin Blacketer
Head Woman Dancer: Bridget Eaglespeaker
 
For vendor space/table and royalty context information please contact: Daydishka McCloud at 360-456-5221, ext. 1239. This event is taking place at the Nisqually Youth and Community Center, located at 1937 Lashi St. S.E. in Olympia.
 

  • September 26, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom (Lakewood): Fall Living History Open House & Annual Used Book Sale.  

Experience life at a fort in the Pacific Northwest!  Living historians in period dress will demonstrate daily activities of soldiers at a 19th Century fort and host guided tours of the historic structures.  Taking place at Quarters 1, 2, 3, and 4 from 10 AM to 4 PM. Additionally, the book sale will be held in Quarters 2 those same hours.  Get terrific bargains on a wide variety of books!  Complimentary admission, but donations are always appreciated. Historic Fort Steilacoom is located on the grounds of Western State Hospital at 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood. 253-582-5838.
 

 
Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 9/1/2020

George Adams – 8/30/2020

George Adams, a member of the Skokomish Tribe in Mason County, was one of the first Native Americans elected to the Washington State Legislature, serving for sixteen years. In this photograph taken early in his career, Adams poses in traditional attire. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on George Adams – 8/30/2020

Sylvester’s Window: 2001 – Arts Walk

Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials)
Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
Styles of Architecture
If you were there
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 2001 – Arts Walk

Sylvester’s Window: 1950 – Grand Parade of Progress

Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials)
Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
If you were there
What else was happening?
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1950 – Grand Parade of Progress

Sylvester’s Window: 1972 – The Big Snow

Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials)
Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
News Clippings
If you were there
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1972 – The Big Snow

Sylvester’s Window: 1933 – The Hunger March

Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials)
Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
If you were there
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1933 – The Hunger March

Sylvester’s Window: 1899 – The Century’s Last Fourth of July

Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials)
Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
If you were there
What else was happening?
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1899 – The Century’s Last Fourth of July

Sylvester’s Window: 1874 – Building a Railroad

Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials)
Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
If you were there
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1874 – Building a Railroad

Sylvester’s Window: 1856 – The Indian War


Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials). The Narrative page linked below describes the scene depicted; click on Meet the Neighbors to learn more about some of the people in the painting. 

Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
If you were there
What else was happening?
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1856 – The Indian War

Sylvester’s Window: 1841 – Cheetwoot


Click on image to view larger image (tip: if you have two monitors, it may be helpful to open the image while you browse the accompanying materials). The Narrative page linked below describes the scene depicted; click on Meet the Neighbors to learn more about some of the people in the painting. 

Narrative
Research
Meet the Neighbors
If you were there
Key to the Places and People in the painting

Return to main Sylvester’s Window page

Posted in Sylvester's window | Tagged | Comments Off on Sylvester’s Window: 1841 – Cheetwoot

Fourth Avenue Bridge – 8/9/2020

The Fourth Avenue Bridge shown here was completed in 1921, replacing a faulty drawbridge. The new bridge accommodated a trolley line from downtown to West Olympia, as well as foot, bicycle, and automobile traffic. After it sustained damage in the 2001 Nisqually Quake, it was reopened and dedicated in 2004 as the Olympia-Yashiro Friendship Bridge. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Unknown photographer, about 1921, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Fourth Avenue Bridge – 8/9/2020

Rutledge and Littlerock – 8/2/2020

Albert Rutledge, son of pioneer Thomas Rutledge, stands behind the rock that gives Littlerock, Washington its name, in this photo from 1963. The Rutledge family settled here in 1855. The homestead was one of the earliest in Washington State, and both it and the rock still exist. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Rutledge and Littlerock – 8/2/2020

Bulletin – 8/1/2020

August 1, 2020 
 
Please help support the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow Museum through our $25 for 25 Campaign! September 2020 marks 25 years since the official opening of the Bigelow House Museum. We had planned a special event but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, that won’t be happening, as the Bigelow House Museum is closed for the foreseeable future. In addition, we have had to make the difficult decision to cancel our biggest fundraiser, the annual Holiday Tour of Homes. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Museum, as well as cancellation of fundraising events, we are asking our friends to consider an extra donation this year. We recognize that economic fallout from the pandemic may make this difficult for some. However, please do consider a $25.00 donation, or whatever amount you can give, to help ensure the future of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Click on the Donate button at the right of this screen to give $25 or any other amount to this campaign, either by credit card or with your Paypal account. Or you can mail a check to us; go to our GET INVOLVED  page for more information. If you are not yet a member of the Society and Museum, please consider visiting our Membership page Membership Page and joining now! And, while OHS&BHM fully supports area businesses, we realize that many are finding local shopping difficult in these trying times. If you are an Amazon customer, please consider donating to OHS&BHM through Amazon’s SMILE program. Information can be found at SMILE. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Information is available at the Get Involved link, above.
 
THANK YOU!!!
 
Thematically based on the real life 1909 Suffrage Special train which carried local and national suffragists across our state from Spokane to Seattle in support of Washington women and their fight for the vote, The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop is an eight-episode video series which will explore Washington state’s connections to the larger national history of women’s suffrage, and honors Washington’s women changemakers who led the way then as well as those who continue to do so today. The Virtual Train makes its final stop in Olympia, on August 26, Women’s Equality Day! The Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be hosting this final Whistle Stop of the tour! More information on the Train can be found in the event listings below.
 
If you had planned to attend the Suffrage Celebration event scheduled on the capitol grounds in Olympia this August, note that this event has been canceled due to the pandemic.
 
And finally, this Tuesday, August 4, is the PRIMARY for the upcoming November 3 GENERAL ELECTION. A more consequential election may never have taken place in this nation, certainly in modern times. We need an informed turn out; BE SURE TO VOTE!
______________________________________________________________

  • August 3 – 7, 10 – 14, 17 – 21, 24 – 28, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – Fort Nisqually Day Camp.

This camp, open to all ages, brings the past to life with stories, songs, crafts and games. Campers live history in an 1855 setting. A daily snack is included.  Guests, patrons and visitors ARE required to use face coverings as well as maintain six feet of physical distance from non-household members and perform frequent hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. This applies to all residents six years old and up,  children under age two are exempt. For kids age 3-5 masks are strongly encouraged. Camp is open to all ages, but children 5 and under must register with parent or guardian. To register your child who is 5 and under contact the Fort at 253-404-3970. Fort Nisqually is located at 5400 N Pearl St #11 Tacoma.
 

  • August 4, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Washington Trust for Historic Preservation – Virtual Panel: Careers in Preservation.

During this virtual panel, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation will be focusing on preservation careers in construction and the trades. These industries are crucial pieces of the cultural and historic resource landscape and provide a wide range professional opportunities—from carpentry and window restoration to project management and engineering—for those interested in saving places that matter. WTPH will be exploring this field with the help of three accomplished preservationists who have traveled different career paths to their current jobs in historic and cultural resources. Panelists will include:
 
– Linley Logan, Arts Program Manager, Northwest Heritage Program, the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center at the Evergreen State College.
– Sarah Steen, Landmarks Coordinator, King County
– Steve Stroming, Project Executive, Rafn Company
 
This virtual panel is FREE and open to all, and registrants will have the chance to submit questions for the panelists before and during the webinar. We hope you’ll join us for this exciting discussion, full of advice for students, young professionals, and anyone else interested in cultural resources and preservation! Click HERE to register now.
 

  • August 4, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. McMenamins Elks Temple Virtual History Pub – Outdoors for 100 Years: Eddie Bauer, the Down Jacket, and Adventure-Driven Innovation

The Pacific Northwest is known for its outdoor adventure opportunities, and a lot of fascinating history surrounds the outfitters and adventurers who created and used the equipment for excursions into the wild. Colin Berg, the Brand Historian for Eddie Bauer, shares the story of the man behind the name as well as the many Pacific Northwesterners who made the brand what it is today.  This event will be taking place on Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/historymuseum/live/
 

  • August 10 & 24, 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society – Speaking Out About Dreams That Matter. 

Speaking Out About Dreams That Matter is a two-part online presentation about people from throughout Tacoma’s history who have worked for social justice and civil rights. Featuring historic photos and media, as well as recent interviews, the presentation will be followed by a question and answer period with Kim Davenport, communications manager for Tacoma Historical Society. This presentation is a partnership between Tacoma Public Library and The Tacoma Historical Society with funding from Tacoma Creates. Registration is required, visithttp://tiny.cc/dreams10
 

  • August 19 thru 26. The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour Video Series Celebrating the National Women’s Suffrage Centennial. 

August 2020 marks the National Women’s Suffrage Centennial, and to celebrate, you are invited to climb aboard the digitally delivered Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour! This eight-episode video series explores our state’s connections to the larger national history of women’s suffrage, and honors Washington’s women change makers who led the way then as well as those who continue to do so today. It is thematically based on the real life 1909 Suffrage Special train which carried local and national suffragists across the country, and through Washington State from Spokane to Seattle in support of women’s fight for the vote. Ride along with the Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour! One segment will be posted daily from August 19-26 on the Historical Society and Votes for Women Suffrage Centennial Facebook pages, @washingtonhistory and @suffrage100wa and at the Washington State Historical Society page athttps://www.washingtonhistory.org/  . Each whistle stop segment will be hosted by a local historical organization and will explore women’s suffrage history and its legacy in their geographic region, as well as ties to national women’s suffrage efforts. The Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be hosting the segment on Olympia, taking place on August 26, Women’s Equality Day, and the date that the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified in 1920.
 
The 1909 National Suffrage Convention was–not coincidentally–held at the same time as the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition (AYPE). It was an important time in the fight for women’s suffrage and savvy suffragists took advantage of the significant visibility afforded by AYPE to promote their cause. And, did you know that Washington women permanently won the right to vote in 1910 (after several previous wins and losses of the right), a FULL DECADE before national women’s suffrage was enacted?
 
The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour schedule includes:
 
August 19 – Spokane
August 20 – Tri-Cities/Walla Walla
August 21 – Yakima/Ellensburg
August 22 – Vancouver
August 23 – Bellingham
August 24 – Seattle
August 25 – Tacoma
August 26 – Olympia
 
The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour is presented in conjunction with Washington State Suffrage Centennial programming (details athttps://www.suffrage100wa.com/  ) through generous legislative support. Presented by the Washington State Historical Society and their partners, the Washington State Women’s Commission, Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, Pasco’s Franklin County Historical Society, Kittitas County Historical Society, Clark County Historical Society, Whatcom Museum, Tacoma Historical Society, and Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.
 
For more information in this terrific event, visit https://www.washingtonhistory.org/event/the-suffrage-special-whistle-stop-tour/
 

  • August 26, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM. Olympia Film Collective – Artists Among Us, Chapter 1: Art Talk, Multimedia. 

Artists Among Us is a documentary series highlighting the local arts scene in South Puget Sound. Each month until October will feature new short documentary movies followed by a filmmaker’s panel. Movies will be premiered on the Olyfilm Facebook page, which can be reached at the Collective’s website, https://www.olyfilm.com/ .  This month’s films are:
 

7:00 PM – Building an Art Gallery Exhibition from Bill Lange
7:15 PM – Life Through Art from Jordie Simpson and Gracen Bayer
7:25 PM – Q&A with the filmmakers at  https://www.facebook.com/OlympiaFilmCollective/videos/285254149461813/
David Ponta
Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum
OHS&BHM PO Box 1821 Olympia, WA 98507
To unsubscribe, send us an e-mail: olyhistory@gmail.com
 
Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 8/1/2020

Elmer Plumb – 7/19/2020

Elmer Plumb, son of early pioneers, operated a cigar and confectionary store in the Cowling Building at 117 Washington Street (the building still exists, in the National Downtown Historic District). A lifelong bachelor, Elmer was asked by a reporter on his 70th birthday, “What are some of the important events which have occurred in Thurston county in your time?” He responded, “pretty near all that’s happened.” Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

1933 photograph, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Elmer Plumb – 7/19/2020

Genealogy Resources

(Legacy page from Roger Easton’s WAResearcher website). Not all links are still active
 


LINKS

Societies:

Misc.

Posted in Easton | Comments Off on Genealogy Resources

Easton Collection

The pages below are legacy pages from the late Roger Easton’s website, WAResearcher.com, copied here by permission from Easton’s literary executor, Ed Echtle. Not all links are still active.

Washington State Archives, Southwest Regional Branch Collections Abstract
Genealogy Resources

Posted in Easton Collection | Comments Off on Easton Collection

Washington State Archives, Southwest Regional Branch Collections Abstract

Note: This is an abridged version of the above.  It contains a listing of records Roger Easton, a volunteer at SW Archives, selected and transcribed, for those interested in family history research, and to others who might visit my home page for other research.  Should you wish to know if other specific records are in this archive, or, should you wish any of the following researched, please contact me. Also, since records are continually being collected, there may be documents not listed as yet. So, feel free to inquire whether a specific record you seek might be now held in this collection.


SW Regional Archives Staff:

Wayne Lawson, Regional Archivist
Lanny Weaver, Assistant Regional Archivist
Terri Juillerat, Customer Services Specialist 2

Located at:

Washington State Archives Building
1120 Washington St. SE
Olympia, WA 98504


Counties and Donations of Genealogical Importance:

Clark
Cowlitz
Grays Harbor [formerly Chehalis County] Lewis
Mason
Pacific
Skamania
Thurston
Wahkiakum

Municipal Governments are included – Information in these municipal governments follow the County Holdings Section below. The Counties have been added for your convenience.

Aberdeen:  Grays Harbor County
Battleground:  Clark County
Bucoda:  Thurston County
Camas:  Clark County
Castle Rock:  Cowlitz County
Cathlamet:  Cowlitz County
Centralia:  Lewis County
Chehalis:  Lewis County Seat
Cosmopolis:  Grays Harbor County
Elma:  Grays Harbor County
Hoquiam:  Grays Harbor County
Kalama:  Cowlitz County
Kelso:  Cowlitz County Seat
La Center:  Clark County
Lacey:  Thurston County
Long Beach:  Pacific County
Longview:  Cowlitz County
McCleary:  Grays Harbor County
Montesano:  Grays Harbor County Seat
Morton:  Lewis County
Napavine:  Lewis County
North Bonneville:  Skamania County
Ocean Shores:  Grays Harbor County
Olympia:  Thurston County Seat, State Capital
Pe Ell:  Lewis County
Rainier:  Thurston County
Raymond:  Pacific County
Shelton:  Mason County Seat
South Bend:  Pacific County Seat
Stevenson:  Skamania County Seat
Tenino:  Thurston County
Tumwater: Thurston County
Vader:  Lewis County
Vancouver:  Clark County Seat
Westport:  Grays Harbor County
Winlock:  Lewis County
Woodland:  Clark County
Yacolt:  Clark County
Yelm:  Thurston County

Special District Records for the nine counties are also stored in the SW Regional Archives. They might include any of the following:

Educational Service Districts
Diking Districts
Fire Districts
Port Districts
Public Utility Districts
School Districts
Water Districts

Since these are specialized, and would usually not be of interest to the genealogist, or casual researcher, they have not been itemized here. (Though the Educational Service Districts may include registers giving students). However, you may contact me for an accounting of specific records interest.  The range of these Counties or Cities is :
 

Educational Service District 112

Clark  1891-1975
Cowlitz   1866-1937
Skamania  1890-1960
Wahkiakum  1903-1971

Educational Service District 113

Lewis 1878-1964
Grays Harbor 1881-1970
Mason 1892-1980
Pacific 1891-1974
Thurston 1891-1984

Consolidated Diking District 1

Longview 1918-1945

Fire Districts

Clark No. 1: 1946-1993
Clark No. 5: 1953-1989
Cowlitz No. 1: 1950-1963
Cowlitz No. 2 1950-1973
Cowlitz No. 3 1958-1963
Cowlitz No. 4 1958-1963
Cowlitz No. 6 1968-1969
Thurston No. 3 1949-1990
Wahkiakum No. 1 1943-1962
Wahkiakum No. 2 1952-1962
Wahkiakum No. 3 1959-1962

Port Districts

Washougal 1935-1989
Chehalis 1914-1998
Grapeview 1923-1991
Grays Harbor 1922-1990
Kalama 1926-1990
Kelso 1927-1929
Longview 1929-1973
Olympia 1922-1997
Ridgefield 1929-1977
Vancouver 1916-1996
Woodland 1960-1969

Public Utility Districts

Clark PUD 1 1925-1994
Cowlitz PUD 1 1937-1973
Grays Harbor PUD 1 1912-1987
Lewis PUD 1 1865-1947
Thurston PUD 1 1937-1961

School Districts

Cowlitz County 1922-1974
Grays Harbor Co. 1922-1974
Mason County 1922-1974
Lewis County 1893-1983
Pacific County 1923-1974
Skamania County 1954-1977
Wahkiakum Co. 1947-1964

Water District No. 2

Lacey 1927-1994


Clark County
Archival Holdings: 1850 – 1997

Assessor:

Drawings, maps, Plans, Plats, Surveys 1955-1989
Mug Shots 1930-1935
Personal Property Assessment & Tax Rolls 1892-1964
Plat Books 1901-1915
Real Property Assessment & Tax Rolls 1881-1972
Real Property (Photographic) Cards 1940-1985

Auditor:

Agreements & Contracts 1873-1911
Birth Register 1891-1907
Chattel Lien Index 1911-1942
Chattel Mortgages with Index 1874-1988
Death Register 1891-1907
Deeds 1859-1959
Divorces 1872-1872
Donation Land Tract Index 1891-1891
School Warrant Registers 1931-1935
Elections 1892-1949
General Indexes 1852-1977
Marriages 1852-1997
Military Discharge Indexes 1919-1975
Military Eligibility Register 1892-1894
Mining Claims 1891-1957
Physician Registers 1881-1890
Property of Married Women 1870-1879
Real Estate Transactions 1906-1906
School Board Membership 1909-1919
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1901-1934

Clerk:

Civil & Domestic Dockets 1970-1997
Civil Appearance Docket 1876-1888
Civil Case Files with Indexing 1889-1991
County Land Registrations 1907-1907
Criminal Appearance Dockets 1970-1997
Death Reports 1915-1915
Delayed Birth Certificates 1941-1943
Judgements with Indexing 1958-1980
Naturalizations 1890-1991
Probate Case Files with Indexing 1890-1979
Wills with Indexing 1898-1940

CommunityDevelopment:

Boundary Line Adjustments 1988-1994
Central Files 1949-1995
Maps, Short Plats, & Surveys 1968-1992
Permits 1972-1993
Project Files 1983-1990
Public Building Drawings 1970-1992
Real Property Lists 1981-1981

Intergovernmental Resource Center:

Administrative Subject Files 1971-1989
Contract Files 1975-1987
Drawings, Maps, Plans, Statistics 1969-1990
Minutes, Agendas, By-laws 1960-1990
Photographic Slides 1987-1987
Plaques of Historic Places 1990-1990
Project Files , Photos, Studies & Surveys 1970-1988
Resolutions 1958-1981

Prosecuting Attorney:

Administrative Files 1990-1990

Public Works:

Administrative Files 1930-1995
Roadway Information Files 1911-1995
Road Survey Section Drawings 1850-1995

Sheriff:

Booking Register 1940-1947
Day Book 1930-1934
Jail Register 1987-1988
Mug Shot Books 1945-1982
Superior Court Exhibit 1908-1922

There are also holdings not listed above for:

Boundary Review Board 1971-1995
Facilities Management 1972-1972
Imaging Committee 1989-1992
Jail Administration 1975-1987
Office of Budget 1993-1995
Planning Office 1978-1990
SW Washington Health District 1878-1995
Treasurer 1884-1952


Cowlitz County
Archival Holdings 1853 – 1997

Assessor:

Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1901-1931
Real Property Assessment Rolls 1892-1970

Auditor:

Physicians Registers 1871-1910
Birth Register 1891-1907
Census Abstract 1881-1881
Chattel Mortgages with Indexing 1899-1977
Death Register 1891-1907
Deeds 1866-1919
School Ledger 1922-1922
Justice Court Case Files 1938-1966
Marriages 1854-1920
Mining Claims 1862-1904
Miscellaneous & Official Recordings 1872-1977
Mortgages 1856-1923
Personal Property Assessments 1873-1906
Special Election Census 1973-1973
Title Abstracts 1873-1890
Voter Register Poll Books (no dates)

Clerk:

Assumed Names Register 1948-1979
Civil Appearance Dockets 1883-1976
Civil Case Files with Indexing 1874-1986
Coroner Files 1884-1921
Corporation & Partnership Index 1907-1954
Court Journal Entries 1887-1887
Criminal Appearance Dockets 1924-1982
Criminal Case Files with Indexing 1895-1984
Criminal Witness Files 1948-1971
Deeds 1890-1908
Delayed Birth Register 1942-1942
Judgements with Indexing 1879-1982
Land Registration Docket 1908-1971
Naturalizations 1869-1980
Pacific County Appearance Docket 1872-1878
Surgeon Certificates 1895-1897
Trial Appearance Dockets 1934-1981
Wills with Index 1878-1914

Treasurer

Real Property Rolls 1965-1991
Tax Ledger 1909-1912

There are also holdings not listed above for:

Commissioners 1891-1980
Corrections Dept. 1974-1977
Engineering Office 1853-1950
Health Dept. 1970-1973
Lower Columbia Community College 1967-1968
Road Dept. 1958-1970
Sheriff 1931-1933


Grays Harbor County
[formerly Chehalis County]
Archival Holdings 1855-1996

Assessor:

Homesteads & Patents 1892-1903
Northern Pacific Railroad Map 1892-1892

Auditor:

Articles of Incorporation with Index 1883-1981
Birth Record with Index 1891-1931
Burial Permits 1908-1979
Chattel Lien Index 1908-1982
Chattel Mortgages with Index 1885-1978
Coroner Documentation 1905-1925
Death Record & Register 1891-1958
Declaration of Candidacy 1908-1934
Deeds 1855-1967
Delayed Births 1942-1953
Dental Certificates 1893-1894
School Warrant Register 1915-1921
Election Documentation 1908-1936
General Indexes 1861-1980
Justice Court Dockets 1891-1974
Lien Record with Indexing 1880-1982
Marriages 1871-1994
Mid-Wifery Registration 1891-1892
Military Discharges 1919-1976
Mining Claims 1881-1975
Mortgages with Indexing 1861-1980
Oakville Physician Register 1907-1930
Physician Registrations 1891-1894
Short Plats & Surveys 1973-1984
Sire Ownership Statements 1890-1938
Plat Description Book 1889-1894
Plats with Index 1884-1968
Title Abstracts 1904-1926
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1900-1994

Clerk:

Attorney Register 1891-1895
Physician Registers 1893-1980
Civil Appearance Dockets/Index 1884-1981
Civil Case Files 1884-1891
Criminal Appearance Dockets 1886-1893
Delayed Births 1941-1943
Guardianship, Administrator, & Executor Bonds 1891-1956
Judgements with Indexing 1886-1980
Letters of Administration,
Guardianship and Testamentary 1885-1971
Naturalizations 1884-1980
Partnership & Firm Name Register/Index 1907-1975
Personal Property Judgement Tax Rolls 1891-1892
Probate Appearance Docket 1872-1984
Probate Case Files 1872-1984
Probate Claims 1885-1914
Probate Journals 1855-1959
Wills with Index 1860-1959

Coroner:

Coroner Record 1909-1974
District Court No. 1; Justice Court Dockets 1907-1966
District Court No. 2: Justice Court Dockets 1927-1981

Human Services:

Aberdeen Death Register 1890-1912
Birth Certification 1882-1979
Death Certification 1907-1979

Prosecuting Attorney:

Case Files, Logs, Opinions 1951-1992
Justice Court Docket 1915-1936

Sheriff:

Appearance Dockets 1913-1970
Case Record Book 1905-1944
Civil Docket 1915-1919
Constable Register 1915-1950
Criminal Dockets 1909-1939
General Indexes 1921-1941
Jail Documentation 1913-1922
Jail Registers 1914-1981
Mug Shots 1909-1966

Also included in the records but not listed:

Commisioners 1982-1993
Public Works 1897-1992

Donations from Grays Harbor County:

Eric Cole….Birds Eye View of Aberdeen, Reproduction 1900
GH. Prosecuting Attny…Annual School Reports Districts 37 & 41 1906
Harbor Art & Frame…Elma & SW WA Photo Collection 1870-1918
Editor, Montesano Vidette Golden Anniversary Edition 1933
Photo Retake Collection 1980
Port of Grays Harbor annual Reports 1923-1984
WPA Proj. No. 2210 Compilation County Records 1858-1874


Lewis County
Archival Holdings 1847-1998

Assessor:

Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1941-1956
Real & Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1879-1907
Real & Personal Property Tax Rolls 1978-1978
Real Property Assessment & Tax Rolls 1875-1985
Real Property Photographic Cards 1975-1990
Road Index 1974-1974
Winlock Real Property File 1911-1917

Auditor:

Articles of Incorporation with Index 1881-1980
Appointments & Oaths of Office 1856-1961
Birth Documentation with Index 1888-1919
Census Documentation 1851-1892
Chattel Lien Index 1911-1954
Chattel Mortgages with Index 1877-1968
Coroner Documentation 1889-1944
Corporate Filings 1891-1988
Death Register 1891-1906
Deeds 1855-1967
Licensing – various types 1866-1961
Drawings, Plats & Surveys with Index 1860-1996
School Advancement Records 1895-1896
School – Teachers Annual Reports 1887-1921
Election Documentation 1867-1960
General Indexes 1856-1987
Homesteads & Patents 1850-1960
Justice Court Documentation 1873-1949
Land & Property Documentation 1856-1898
Marriages 1847-1994
Military Eligibility Listing 1889-1889
Mining Claims with Index 1880-1963
Miscellaneous & Official Recordings with Index 1856-1998
Mortgages 1856-1967
Prosecuting Attorney Files 1914-1937
Real & Personal Property Assessment & Tax Rolls 1859-1932
Title Abstracts 1893-1903
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1916-1934

Clerk:

Attorney Register 1918-1983
Physician Registers with Index 1891-1975
Civil & Criminal Case Files 1877-1889
Civil & Probate Case Index 1890-1917
Civil Appearance Dockets 1880-1987
Criminal Appearance Dockets 1914-1975
Delayed Birth Certification 1941-1943
Jury Documentation with Index 1886-1986
Justice & Superior Court Case Files 1890-1896
Justice Court Dockets 1893-1955
Miscellaneous Files 1852-1934
Naturalizations 1880-1973
Probate Appearance Dockets 1885-1983
Probate Case Files with Index 1850-1982
Probate Claims 1917-1935
Probate Decrees & Judgements 1885-1894
Probate Record 1852-1951
Wills 1884-1982

Health Department:

Birth Certificates 1884-1956
Birth & Death Certificates 1914-1959

Sheriff:

Appearance Dockets 1945-1947
Case Documentation 1913-1976
General Documentation 1911-1950
Mug Shots 1920-1929
Prisoner Register 1908-1946

Also in the records but not included here:

Community Services 1987-1989
Treasurer 1879-1976

Donations from Lewis County:

Federal Social Security Administration -Chehalis Office:

Lewis Co. 8th Grade Documentation 1899-1956
Lewis Co. Final Standing of Pupils 1939-1940
Lewis Co. Listing of School Districts 1963
Lewis Co. Non-Resident Reports 1916-1942
Lewis Co. Private School Reports 1920-1948
Lewis Co. School Census Reports 1891-1932
Lewis Co. Term Reports 1894-1909

Trudy Hannon. “John R. Jackson, WA’s 1st Pioneer” 1998
Lewis Co. Genealogical Soc.”Onalaska History” 1997
Lewis Co. Historical Museum:

Chehalis Bee-Nugget 1899-1937
Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1916-1934
Real Property Assessment Rolls 1919-1934
Spanish War Veteran Roster 1942
Title Abstracts 1865-1945


Mason County
Archival Holdings 1856-1996

Assessor:

Census Documentation 1879-1892
Personal Property Assessment Roll 1946-1952
Real Property Assessment Cards 1952-1985
Real Property Assessment Tax Rolls 1890-1953

Auditor:

Articles of Incorporation 1934-1974
Birth Register 1891-1972
Census Documentation 1917-1966
Chattel Mortgages with Index 1899-1977
Death Register 1891-1906
Deeds with Indexing 1867-1962
Education – Teacher’s Records 1891-1939
Elected Officials Register 1891-1894
Homesteads & Patents 1890-1956
Indian Marriages Record 1874-1887
Justice Court Dockets 1885-1956
Land Title Register 1913-1948
Liens with Indexing 1876-1980
Marriages 1857-1896
Metzker Map Collection 1941-1941
Military Discharges with Index 1892-1962
Mining Documentation with Index 1877-1972
Miscellaneous Recordings 1863-1970
Miscellaneous Documentation 1889-1960
Mortgages 1856-1962
Plats 1859-1957
School Journal 1886-1898
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1906-1933
Voter Registration Cards 1937-1992

Clerk:

Civil Appearance Dockets 1889-1974
Civil Case Files 1889-1992
General Court Index 1890-1929
Justice Court Dockets 1893-1914
Land Registration Docket 1912-1923
Marriages 1887-1916
Naturalizations 1888-1972
Probate Appearance Docket 1909-1974
Probate Bonds 1915-1962
Probate Documentation 1858-1885
Probate Journal 1884-1907
Trial & Motion Docket 1909-1930
Wills 1884-1928

Coroner:

Autopsy Reports 1950-1956
Death Certificates 1940-1966

Sheriff:

Case Record Book 1919-1925
Prison Record 1891-1928
Prisoner Register 1915-1919

Other records not included here:

Commissioners 1890-1989
Emergency Services Dept. 1959-1996
Mason County Fair 1974-1982
Health Office 1979-1982
Treasurer 1857-1872

Donations from Mason County:

Olympia Office Federal Social Security Administration: Mason County School Census Reports 1917-1932
Ted Rakoski: Retired Mayor’s Photographs including John Tornow, and Reminiscences 1890-1996


Pacific County
Archival Holdings: 1850 -1986

Assessor:

Landowner Property Index 1890-1890
Lot Indexes 1872-1908
Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1891-1956
Real Property Assessment Rolls 1879-1980
Tract Indexes 1872-1908

Auditor:

Articles of Incorporation 1872-1980
Business Documentation 1874-1986
Census 1892-1892
Chattel Lien Indexes 1910-1979
Chattel Mortgages with Index 1889-1984
Coroner Documentation 1913-1926
Deed Record Tax Sales 1915-1965
Deeds 1850-1861
Donation Land & Mining Indexes 1872-1905
Educational Documentation 1860-1955
Election Documentation 1892-1980
Franchises 1906-1919
General Indexes 1861-1885
Grantee Index of Assessor 1861-1885
Homesteads & Patents 1867-1906
Justice Court Documents 1869-1967
Land Applications 1903-1960
Marriage License Receipt Book 1946-1947
Military Register 1887-1887
Miscellaneous Mortgages & Deeds 1895-1933
Miscellaneous Records 1884-1978
Mortgages 1890-1967
Mother’s Pension Documentation 1913-1936
Naturalizations 1885-1908
School Land Lease Register 1891-1893
Tax Abstracts 1891-1922
Title Abstracts 1903-1960
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1892-1933
Wahkiakum County Election Returns 1906-1906

Clerk:

Adoption Files 1890-1915
Appearance Docket 1872-1878
Civil Case Files 1890-1982
Coroner Reports 1912-1921
Criminal & Civil Case Files 1878-1889
Criminal Case Files 1920-1980
Ilwaco Voter Register 1911-1911
Justice Court Dockets 1889-1950
Land Title Registers 1907-1929
Physicians Licensing 1881-1957
Naturalizations 1888-1974
Probate Bonds 1852-1950

Sheriff:

Dockets 1901-1927

Treasurer:

Lands Bought for Taxes 1877-1890
Lot Indexes 1872-1906
Tax Collection Register 1895-1898
Tract Indexes 1872-1906

Other Records not included here:

Engineering Office 1910-1971
Road Department 1963-1963


Skamania County
Archival Holdings 1854 – 1996

Assessor:

Aerial Photos 1956-1947
Personal Property Assessment Roll 1891-1933
Real Property Assessment & Tax Rolls 1880-1965
Tax Roll Indexes 1925-1931

Auditor:

Birth Documentation 1893-1962
Chattel Mortgages 1879-1891
Deeds & Mortgages 1854-1895
Educational -School Ledgers 1912-1935
Election Documentation 1892-1934
General Indexes 1856-1889
Marriages 1856-1919
Miscellaneous Recordings 1854-1877
Obituaries 1900-1929
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1916-1935

Clerk:

Administrator Bonds 1863-1898
Appearance & Execution Dockets 1894-1985
Case File Briefs 1895-1964
Civil Case Calendars 1890-1933
Civil Case Files Indexed & with Exhibits 1892-1984
Guardianship Letters 1914-1953
Journal Registers 1890-1967
Naturalizations 1893-1974
Probate Appearance Docket 1922-1985
Probate Bonds 1913-1967
Probate Case Files & Index 1889-1984
Probate Claims 1920-1934
Probate Journals 1854-1967
Will Deposition Certificates 1914-1931
Wills 1872-1962

Treasurer:

School Ledgers 1911-1944
Tax Collection Documentation 1892-1911
Tax Roll Account with Auditor 1912-1940

Other records not included here:

Ambulance Service 1962-1981


Thurston County
Archival Holdings 1851 – 1997

Assessor:

Census 1871-1892
Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1891-1939
Real & Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1871-1875
Real Property (Photographic)Cards 1936-1971

Auditor:

Articles of Incorporation with Index 1870-1980
Birth Register 1891-1907
Chattel Liens with Index 1910-1983
Chattel Mortgages with Index 1855-1978
Death Register 1891-1907
Deeds 1852-1979
Dental, Physician Licensing 1881-1979
Educational – School Ledgers 1915-1920
Educational – Teachers Ledgers 1911-1912
Election Records 1852-1981
First Record Book of Thurston County 1852-1857
General Indexes 1852-1981
Homestead, Patents with Donation Index 1869-1904
Justice Court Dockets 1891-1963
Land Applications 1936-1939
Lands Sold Listing 1868-187_
Large Lot Surveys 1889-1994
Liens 1853-1963
Maps, Plans, Plats, & Surveys Indexed 1890-1994
Marriages 1853-1997
Military Discharge Documentation 1918-1963
Miscellaneous & Official Recordings 1853-1971
Miscellaneous School Documentation 1859-1922
Mortgages 1857-1858
Persons Liable for Military Duty 1892-1894
Property Record 1870-1967
Title Abstracts with Registers 1853-1982
Tract Record 1883-1891
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1890-1934
Yelm Irrigation Ditch Documentation 1910-1956

Clerk:

Administrator & Executor Bonds 1891-1951
Appearance Dockets 1854-1949
Civil & District Court Case Files 1851-1930
Court Calendars 1891-1976
Court Journal 1862-1876
Criminal Case Files 1890-1929
Domestic Case Files 1897-1916
Execution Documents with Index 1854-1967
Judgements with Indexing 1874-1945
Justice Court Documentation 1877-1935
Land Registration 1908-1949
Letters of Administration 1891-1971
Letters of Testamentary 1878-1971
Miscellaneous Documentation 1889-1905
Naturalizations 1849-1974
Probate Files with Index 1852-1892
Probate Journals 1943-1944
Trial Docket 1911-1918
Wills 1892-1971

Coroner:

Coroner Record 1913-1943
Fatality Reports 1947-1950
Inquests 1943-1960

Prosecuting Attorney:

Civil Case Files 1963-1986
Criminal Case Files 1928-1960
Miscellaneous Files 1928-1960

Regional Planning:

Olympia Area Sanborn Maps 1884-1947

Sheriff:

Appearance Dockets 1887-1988
Day Books 1893-1898
Jail Register 1887-1926
Journals 1889-1907
Photographic Retake Collection 1860-1990
Tax Cases 1880-1880

Treasurer:

Tax Roll Documentation 1894-1965

Donations from Thurston County:

Roger Easton: Reconstruction of Early Olympia, using Sanborn map of period, and city directories, all buildings in Downtown Olympia identified – giving firm names 1906-1907
Ivy Kohler: “History in Pictures” Prince, Davis, Tyrell families” 1995
“The Roving White’s, VA to WA” 1996
Lacey Museum: Lacey School District Record 1913-1918
Tom Hunter: Collection City Council Minutes with Working Papers 1913-1918
Larry Mayas: “Nicely Valley Remembrances”  (By child of James McCallister, this hand-written document is an
account of early settlement of Thurston County, and an eye-witness account of the 1855 Indian War) 1915
Tumwater Historical Museum: Crosby Warehouse Ledger 1859-1860
Frank Steven’s Journal 1892
Survey Map 1854
Bernice Van Mechelen: “Tons of Memories”, a history of Black Lake, Delphi, and Waddell Creek School districts 1998
Mary Zindt: McCallister School District Records 1907-1925


Wahkiakum County
Archival Holdings 1852 – 1994

Assessor:

Land Documentation no dates
Lot Documentation no dates
Personal Property Assessment Rolls 1896-1941
Real Property Assessment Rolls 1910-1974
Real Property Indexes 1918-1970

Auditor:

Chattel Mortgages with Index 1896-1951
Deeds 1883-1969
Educational Documentation 1900-1974
Election Documentation 1900-1944
Marriage Affidavits 1907-1939
Mortgages with Index 1878-1969
Voter Register & Poll Books 1912-1952

Clerk:

Appearance Dockets 1890-1987
Bar Docket 1890-1914
Business Certificates with Index 1914-1981
Civil & Criminal Case Files 1910-1921
Civil Case Files 1890-1988
Columbia River Sun 1907-1940
Court Calendar 1890-1928
Court Journals 1890-1993
Cowlitz County Advocate 1960-1960
Day Book 1916-1916
Defendant Index 1890-1916
Execution Dockets 1892-1916
Grays River Builder 1938-1940
Judgement Indexes 1902-1992
Longview Daily News 1936-1970

Clerk:

Minutes & Will Record 1895-1994
Miscellaneous Index 1914-1981
Naturalizations 1869-1974
Probate Appearance Dockets 1852-1992
Probate Bonds 1915-1990
Probate Case Files 1855-1981
Probate Claims 1927-1950
Probate Letters 1880-1993
Probate Petitions 1878-1929
Wahkiakum County Eagle 1936-1993
Wills 1877-1993

Sheriff:

Case Documentation 1923-1946
Cathlamet Prct. Justice Court Dockets 1872-1953
Execution Docket 1923-1927
Jail Register 1880-1896
Justice Court Documentation 1891-1953
Mug Shots 1956-1958
Prisoner Registers 1895-1904

Treasurer:

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Visitors Register 1909-1909
Educational Documentation 1893-1977

Other records not included here:

Engineering 1930-1951
County Fair 1946-1987
Public Works 1989-1989
Road Dept. 1958-1970


Municipality Holdings
in the SW Regional Archives
 
 

Aberdeen (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Birth Register 1892-1906
Death Register 1892-1906

Police Dept.:

Alphabetical Files 1920-1960
Case Index 1930-1930
Case Journal 1918-1922
Photographic Retake Collection 1935-1990
Wanted Log 1932-1932

Battleground (Clark)

City Clerk:

Ordinances 1951-1995
The Reflector 1989-1995
Minutes 1951-1995

Police Dept.:

Administrative Files 1951-1980

Bucoda (Thurston)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1887-1997
Minutes 1935-1996
Ordinances 1910-1997
Photographic Retake Collection 1920-1930
Resolutions 1952-1997

Camas (Clark)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1906-1992
Camas-Washougal Post Record 1993-1993
Justice Court Dockets 1923-1947
Minutes 1906-1991
Ordinances 1903-1969
Portraits of City Officials 1950-1960
Property Owner Ledger 1915-1915
Resolutions 1918-1980
Voter Register & Poll Books 1916-1932

Castle Rock (Cowlitz)

City Clerk:

Census Board Documentation 1945-1971
Deeds 1918-1962
Election Documentation 1911-1971
Fire Department Documentation 1925-1972
Minutes 1928-1995
Ordinances with Index 1890-1983
Resolutions with Index 1969-1989
Voter Register & Poll Books 1911-1970

Municipal Court:

Justice Court Dockets 1889-1960
Municipal Court Docket 1960-1969
Police Judge Reports 1926-1947

Police Dept.:

Marshall Accounting Ledger 1891-1919
Marshall Reports 1926-1933
Police Log 1970-1970
Police Report 1976-1976

Cathlamet (Wahkiakum)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1908-1912
General Ledger 1913-1930
Justice Court Dockets 1909-1979
Mapping 1936-1954
Ordinances 1907-1997
Property Description (Photo Record) 1970-1980
Resolutions with Index 1981-1997
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1940-1960

Centralia (Lewis)

City Clerk:

Jail Registers 1923-1952
Justice Court Documents 1890-1938
Ordinances 1886-1993
Prison Registers 1907-1926
Scrapbooks 1925-1955
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1899-1906

Chehalis (Lewis)

City Clerk:

Miscellaneous Documentation 1923-1937
Ordinances 1884-1995

Cosmopolis (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1859-1992
Ordinances 1891-1997
Photographic Retake Collection 1890-1980

Municipal Court:

Case Dockets 1986-1989
Case Files 1979-1984
Police Court Dockets 1956-1982

Elma (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1951-1994
Annexation & Census Documents 1970-1983
Birth & Death Documentation 1907-1986
Ordinances & Resolutions with Index 1888-1997
Physicians Register 1914-1915
Police Department Documentation 1975-1980
The Chronicle & East County News 1986-1994
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1880-1889

Municipal Court:

Justice Court Documents 1909-1972

Hoquiam (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Cemetery Board Documentation 1934-1993
Census Files 1899-1967
Deeds 1941-1954
Election Documentation 1921-1980
Fire Department Documentation 1903-1994
Legal Files 1901-1997
Letters of Administration & Testamentary 1949-1952
Ordinances 1890-1991
Police Blotters 1915-1936
Police Department Reports 1905-1978
Prison Record 1907-1927
Resolutions 1901-1991
Title Abstracts 1890-1929
Urban Renewal Project ( with Photos) 1951-1978

Police Dept.:

Fingerprint Cards 1938-1940
Photographic Retake Collection 1920-1980
Record of Arrests 1927-1946

Kalama (Cowlitz)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1891-1990
Birth Register 1919-1940
Census Record 1940-1981
Death Documentation 1913-1947
Delayed Births 1942-1942
Drawings, Maps, Plans, Plats 1903-1995
Election Documentation 1890-1968
Fire Department Documentation 1924-1947
Justice Court Dockets 1894-1966
Justice Court Documentation 1903-1964
Ordinances 1872-1975

Kelso (Cowlitz)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1890-1997
Deeds 1888-1935
Election Documentation 1908-1964
Kelso Pct. Justice Court Docket 1890-1911
Mortgages 1906-1920
Ordinances 1890-1984
Photographs 1932-1975
Resolutions 1908-1988
Title Abstracts 1905-1926

Police Dept.:

Jail Register 1925-1937
Police Court Dockets 1943-1966

La Center (Clark)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1917-1987
Census Documentation 1940-1986
Election Documentation 1912-1975
Fire Department Documentation 1939-1990
Justice Court Dockets 1909-1958
Justice Court Documentation 1925-1942
Ordinances 1913-1984
Resolutions 1927-1978
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1909-1960

Lacey (Thurston)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1917-1985
Ordinances with Index 1966-1993
Resolutions with Index 1966-1993
The Advocate 1985-1986

Municipal Court:

General Documentation 1973-1978

Public Works:

Administrative Subject Files 1967-1978
Annexation File 1967-1978
Drawings, Maps, Plans, Plats 1975-1980

Long Beach (Pacific)

City Clerk:

Long Beach Pct. Justice Court Dockets 1903-1927
Voter Register & Poll Books 1920-1960

Longview (Cowlitz)

City Manager:

Administrative Subject Files 1924-1984
Annexation Files 1956-1977
Election Documentation 1949-1983
Ordinances 1971-1991

Police Dept.:

Justice Court Dockets 1924-1925
Justice Court Documentation 1925-1931
Officer’s Daily Reports 1927-1961

McCleary (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Court Blotter 1966-1985
Justice Court Dockets 1945-1992
Police Card Catalog File 1975-1983
Police Patrol Logs 1987-1988

Montesano (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk

Miscellaneous Instruments -indexed 1883-1988
Ordinances 1884-1974
Police Docket 1976-1976
Resolution Index 1934—1985

Morton (Lewis)

City Clerk:

Morton Journal 1990-1990

Napavine (Lewis)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1954-1984
Census Documentation 1953-1981
Justice Court Documents 1913-1975
Maps 1920-1925
Marshall Reports 1974-1976
Ordinances 1915-1990
Photographic Retake Collection 1930-1980
Resolutions 1921-1988
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1926-1933

North Bonneville (Skamania)

City Clerk:

Drawings, Plats, & Specifications 1975-1983
Legal Files 1953-1988
Miscellaneous Court Cases 1975-1987
Newspapers, Newsletters, Clippings 1977-1985
Ordinances 1936-1994
Relocation Photographic Collection 1975-1985
Relocation Subject Files, Corresp. 1955-1995
Resolutions 1952-1996
Skamania School Dist. 2 Minutes 1976-1977

Ocean Shores (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Ocean Observer 1985-1987
Ocean Shores Community Review 1976-1977

Olympia (Thurston)

City Attorney:

Annexation Papers 1926-1926
Litigation Files 1923-1928
Miscellaneous Ordinances 1923-1928

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1926-1990
Business Documentation 1934-1964
Election Documentation 1949-1956
Miscellaneous Instruments 1884-1973
Minutes – Indexed 1891-1979
Ordinances Indexed 1859-1988
Resolution Index N.D.-1988

Fire Dept.:

General Documentation 1869-1965

Mayor:

General Documentation 1925-1964

Parks/Recreation:

General Documentation 1916-1964

Planning Commission:

General Documentation 1928-1964
Maps & Drawings 1968-1971

Police Dept.:

General Documentation 1944-1962
Mug Shot Book 1948-1953
Newspaper Articles 1891-1947
Photo Collection 1949-1961

Town Marshall:

Tax Assessment Roll 1861-1861

Utilities Dept.:

Administrative Subject Files 1927-1973
Addition/Annexation Files 1945-1969
Plats & Maps 1960-1967

Pe Ell (Lewis)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1903-1995
Cemetery Compilation of Names 1892-1970
Cemetery Plot & Lot Sales Record 1902-1938
Census Reports 1944-1992
Drawings, Maps, Plans, Specs. 1923-1982
Election Documentation 1928-1973
Fire Dept. Documentation 1930-1956
Justice/Municipal Court Documentation 1933-1974
Justice Court Dockets 1906-1936
Ordinances 1906-1996
Property Assessment Record 1915-1973
Real Property Tax Statements 1908-1922
Resolutions 1921-1994
Police Register 1906-1927
Voter Register & Poll Books 1920-1933

Rainier (Thurston)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1980-1990
Census Documentation 1970-1988
Election Documentation 1949-1977
Marriage Licenses 1952-1961
Ordinances 1987-1987
Resolutions 1955-1981
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1946-1964

Raymond (Pacific)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1908-1955
Census Report 1912-1912
Civil Court Cases 1920-1938
Ordinances 1907-1920
Resolutions 1907-1916
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1907-1950

Police Dept.:

Booking Docket 1910-1914

Municipal Court:

Justice Court Documents 1907-1939

Shelton (Mason)

City Clerk:

Justice Court Docket 1887-1892
Minutes 1889-1997
Ordinances 1889-1989
Resolutions 1945-1997
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1895-1961

Police Dept.:

Booking Documents 1940-1951
Jail Register 1935-1937
Justice Court Documents 1890-1926
Ordinances 1889-1917

South Bend (Pacific)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1946-1949
Journal 1901-1953
Minutes 1890-1996
Ordinances 1890-1997
Police Court Dockets 1922-1974

Stevenson (Skamania)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1908-1991
Census Record 1958-1985
Election Documentation 1911-1967
Census Record 1958-1985
Election Documentation 1911-1967
Minutes 1907-1997
Ordinances 1908-1997
Plats & Specifications 1938-1951
Resolutions 1925-1997
Voters Register & Poll Books 1912-1925

Tenino (Thurston)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1909-1991
Census Record 1974-1982
Drawings & Specification 1970-1976
Election Documentation 1938-1977
Minutes 1906-1993
Ordinances with Index 1906-1991
Real & Personal Property Assessments 1931-1934
Resolutions 1935-1990
Tenino Independent 1934-1995
Tenino Pct. Justice Court Dockets 1907-1957
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1910-1932

Tumwater (Thurston)

City Clerk:

Minutes 1869-1936
Our First 150 Years 1995-1995

Vader (Lewis)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1960-1983
Census Record 1970-1970
Election Record 1932-1944
Minutes 1906-1996
Ordinances Indexed 1906-1997
Plat Drawing 1911-1911
Police Court Dockets 1906-1972
Voter Register & Poll Books 1913-1983

Vancouver (Clark)

City Fire Dept.:

Central Station Administrative Files 1943-1988
Fire Incident Logs 1939-1990

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1867-1996
Annexation Documentation 1948-1947
Ordinances with Index 1861-1997
Resolutions 1935-1997
Vancouver Pct. Justice Court Dockets 1858-1967

Park Hill Cemetery:

Burial Permits 1910-1992
Grave & Lot Sales Records 1915-1974
Interment Index 1915-1955
Maps & Plats 1938-1974

Parks & Recreation:

Park Hill Cemetery Files 1972-1978

Police Dept.:

Mug Shot Book 1902-1940
Newspaper Clipping Book 1910-1933

Westport (Grays Harbor)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1914-1992
Minutes 1914-1982
Ordinances 1914-1952
Scrapbook Collection 1984-1989
Voter Registration & Poll Books 1914-1932

Municipal Court:

Case Files with Indexing 1973-1987
Court Dockets 1962-1988

Police Dept.:

Miscellaneous Logs 1987-1995
Photographs 1977-1977

Winlock (Lewis)

Town Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1874-1990
Election Documentation 1882-1979
Fire Department Documentation 1940-1978
Justice Court Dockets 1911-1955
Justice Court Documentation 1891-1978
Marshall Files 1891-1905
Minutes 1891-1992
Ordinances 1891-1995
Resolutions 1965-1994
Voter Register & Poll Books 1891-1903

Woodland (Clark)

City Clerk:

Administrative Subject Files 1914-1988
Annexation Documentation 1957-1977
Census Record 1930-1988
Deeds & Easements 1931-1984
Drawings, Maps, Plats & Specs. 1929-1989
Fire Dept. Documentation 1911-1990
Justice Court Documents 1960-1969
Ordinances with Index 1906-1987
Property Record 1920-1988
Resolutions 1914-1988
Voter Register & Poll Books 1912-1968

Municipal Court:

Administrative Subject Files 1990-1992

Yacolt (Clark)

Town Clerk:

Audit Examinations 1923-1974

Yelm (Thurston)

Town Clerk:

Audit Examinations 1928-1974

Posted in Easton Collection | Comments Off on Washington State Archives, Southwest Regional Branch Collections Abstract

Capitol Lake swimming area – 7/12/2020

When the Capitol Lake recreation area opened in summer 1964, it was an instant hit with adults and children alike. Here an unidentified grownup makes a big splash while trying out the water slide. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Capitol Lake swimming area – 7/12/2020

1908 Suffrage Float – 7/5/2020

The 1908 Fourth of July parade in downtown Olympia featured a float, dubbed the Liberty Car, promoting the drive for women’s suffrage. Women dressed in white, the emblem of the suffrage movement, wear sashes representing the states, while float queen Mollie Moore is draped in the flag. Women’s Suffrage was passed in Washington State in 1910, and nationally in 1920. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Unknown photographer, 1908, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 1908 Suffrage Float – 7/5/2020

Bulletin – 7/1/2020

July 1, 2020      
 
Washington State is slowly beginning to open back up, but many venues remain closed. Given the unpredictable nature of the pandemic, be sure to verify that any event you are considering has not been cancelled or rescheduled.

 

Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum is pleased to announce a major upgrade to the popular Sanborn Overlay feature of our website. Historical insurance maps from 1884, 1891, 1908, 1924, and 1947 are superimposed over contemporary aerials or basemaps. Buildings from our Where Are We? feature can also be located by turning on an optional layer in each series. The upgrade uses color maps, newly available from the Library of Congress, that add a great richness of detail. It also adds the 1947 series, which greatly expanded the area covered. Visit https://olympiahistory.org/the-sanborn-overlays/ for more information and to view these intriguing maps.
______________________________________________________________
  • University of Puget Sound (Tacoma) – Community Summer 2020: Virtual Classes.

Looking for ways to connect this summer? University of Puget Sound is excited to offer new virtual courses to foster connection and learning in the local community and beyond. Special interest classes are being offered in June and July and are open to the public. Explore such topics as civil rights history, business leadership, professional communications, classical music, rock and roll and family history archiving — all taught by inspiring Puget Sound faculty and staff in a live, interactive online format. Community Summer 2020 welcomes students of all ages. For details and to register, visitwww.pugetsound.edu/puget-sound-community-summer-2020/ Fees vary by class. 

  • July 13 – 17, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – Camp Fort Nisqually.

Ages 12 to 14! Discover what life was like at Puget Sound’s first trading post. With an in-depth look at the people and events that shaped the Fort’s history, you’ll learn 19th century skills such as blacksmithing and fire starting. Snacks and Friday lunch are provided. Please note that  while attending this event, guests, patrons and visitors ARE REQUIRED to use face coverings as well as maintain six feet of physical distance from non-household members and perform frequent hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. The new statewide requirement applies to all residents six years old an up. Children under age two are exempt. For kids age 3-5 masks are strongly encouraged. For information, visit https://www.metroparkstacoma.org/event/camp-fort-nisqually-2/ Fort Nisqually is located at 5400 N Pearl St #11 Tacoma.

  • July 14, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM. Grit City Think & Drink – Volcanic Ecology: Just Add Water. 

Dr. Carri LeRoy of The Evergreen State College current research focuses on how streams have developed in the 40 years since the eruption of Mt St Helens. The catastrophic lateral blast resulted in a massive landslide that covered forests and streams around Spirit Lake in up to 300 feet of sterile pumice and ash. Snowmelt, springs, and runoff have carved new watersheds across what is known as the Pumice Plain. New stream channels are being quickly colonized by willow, which is particularly interesting because they have both male and female individuals. In 2018, Dr. LeRoy was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for this research. This talk explores both new watershed development and the influence of willow sex on in-stream communities and ecosystem processes. Carri LeRoy has been a freshwater ecologist at The Evergreen State College since 2006. She completed her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences in 2005 at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, AZ, a Masters in Liberal Studies (Environmental Education) in 2001, and her undergraduate degrees in Environmental Science and International Studies at Oregon State University. She Co-Directed the Sustainability in Prisons Project from 2011-2017. Dr. LeRoy’s research focuses on how riparian forests interact with streams and provide energy through leaf litter fall. Her research has shown that both the species diversity and genetic diversity of these litter inputs can affect in-stream leaf litter decomposition rates, aquatic fungi and aquatic macro invertebrates. For event info, visit https://www.tacoma.uw.edu/sias/thinkndrink or call (253) 692-4450. This event is FREE and Kid-Friendly! 

  • July 23, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. Washington Center for the Performing Arts – 2020 Center Stage Virtual Gala. 

The Washington Center for the Performing Arts in Olympia is having a virtual fundraiser, including a terrific online auction!  For more information, visit
https://www.washingtoncenter.org/event/2020-center-stage-awards-gala/ 

  • July 28 – 31, 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – History Through the Arts. 

Ages 9 to 11! Travel back to the 1850’s, learning crafts, activities, music and games associated with the many different cultures that were part of Fort Nisqually. Snacks and lunch are provided. Please note that  while attending this event, guests, patrons and visitors ARE REQUIRED to use face coverings as well as maintain six feet of physical distance from non-household members and perform frequent hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. The new statewide requirement applies to all residents six years old an up. Children under age two are exempt. For kids age 3-5 masks are strongly encouraged. For information, visit https://www.metroparkstacoma.org/event/history-through-the-arts-camps/ Fort Nisqually is located at 5400 N Pearl St #11 Tacoma. 

  • City of Olympia – Marine Creature Mondays Video Series.

Visit https://streamteam.info/marine-creature-monday-videos/ to enjoy weekly marine education video posts showcasing  the amazing marine critters found under the sea in Puget Sound. Created by underwater videographer Matt Balder and Bob Wharton, marine biologist and narrator. 

  • City of Olympia – Purple Martin Citizen Science Lollapalooza. 

Looking for something new to do as you follow social distancing guidelines? Mid to late April marks the return of the largest swallows in North America, the purple martin. Strictly a Western Washington species, the martin is the least-common swallow and the only species of martins on this continent. Migrating to the Pacific Northwest and up into Canada from as far away as the Amazon River and southern Brazil, the martins return to their summer homesites delighting us with their aerial acrobatic flights. From April to September volunteers monitor the martin nest boxes weekly at East Bay in downtown Olympia. Attend a short training on monitoring basics and bird identification. No experience necessary. Pack your mask and binoculars and head out to monitor the East Bay purple martins. It’s easy, visit www.streamteam.info/purplemartin to download data sheets and directions!

  • Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – Fort Nisqually at Home! 

Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is offering some fascinating online explorations for all to enjoy. Watch Fort Skills Videos on everything from candle making to playing 19th century games such as CHARADES (yes, VERY Victorian!) , even create your own puppet show! Visit https://www.metroparkstacoma.org/activities-for-home/ for details on these terrific and KID FRIENDLY events! 

  • City of Olympia – Bats of the Pacific Northwest.  

Enjoy videos taken in real-time by local bat expert Greg Falxa.  Follow along as Greg talks about the various local  bat species and their adaptations for the habitat they (and WE!) live in. Visit https://streamteam.info/bat-videos-and-sounds/ for this amazing stor

Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 7/1/2020

Wooden Pipes – 6/28/2020

Early public water systems used wooden pipes to carry water underground to homes and businesses. One major manufacturer of wooden pipes was the National Wood Pipe company, located about where the Hands On Children’s Museum is today. This photograph shows a load of wooden pipes being transported along the Union Railroad tracks on Jefferson Street. Recent excavations on Legion Way unearthed one of these older wooden pipes. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Wooden Pipes – 6/28/2020

Fourth Avenue in 1860s – 6/21/2020

This drawing of Fourth Avenue, reproduced in an 1891 edition of the Olympia Tribune, was based on an earlier photograph, now lost. It shows Fourth Avenue, looking west. The building with the cupola at the right of the image is Columbia Hall, the current site of the Fourth Ave Tav. Image selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Fourth Avenue in 1860s – 6/21/2020

Civil War veterans – 6/14/2020

A group of Washington State Civil War veterans gathered for a convention in Olympia in 1934, posing here for their photograph in the Old State Capitol Building (now Superintendent of Public Instruction). The local chapter of the Civil War veterans’ association, known as the Grand Army of the Republic, gathered each year for a picnic at Priest Point Park until the 1930s; the Olympia GAR chapter’s oldest veteran died in 1939. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Vibert Jeffers photo, 1934, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Civil War veterans – 6/14/2020

Ernest Cheeka – 6/7/2020

In 1964, Ernest Cheeka, Jr., was named chief of the Makah Tribe. Cheeka, then a resident of Olympia, took the Indian name of Khulchoot. He is pictured here with a ceremonial mask, in preparation for his installation. Cheeka was a Vietnam veteran, accomplished artist, and supporter of Native American rights and traditions. He died in 2011. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Ernest Cheeka – 6/7/2020

The Importance of Being Earnest – 5/31/2020

Our focus this month has been Thurston County’s long love affair with amateur theatrics. School dramatic performances have always been popular with students and parents alike. In this Daily Olympian publicity photograph from 1966, Tumwater High School students Virginia Hamrick, Jim Damitio, Rick Yarber, Kathy Kohse, and Candy Street rehearse a performance of The Importance of Being Earnest, a perennial favorite among high school and local theater companies.  Photograph selected by costumier Melanie Ransom on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1966, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on The Importance of Being Earnest – 5/31/2020

Whirl O’ The Town – 5/24/2020

Our focus this month is Thurston County’s long love affair with amateur theatrics. In 1908 a performance of The Whirl O’ the Town was staged at the 1,000-seat Olympia Opera House, as a fund raiser for a new Olympia Woman’s Club home. Its previous clubhouse had burned down in 1907. With a cast numbering about 100, the seats were undoubtedly filled with performers’ relatives and friends.   Photograph selected by costumier Melanie Ransom on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Unknown photographer, 1908, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Whirl O’ The Town – 5/24/2020

Minstrels – 5/17/2020

Our focus this month is Thurston County’s long love affair with amateur theatrics. Unlike some other kinds of comedy routines, men dressing as women never seems to go out of style. In this image, one of a montage of publicity images for a local minstrel show, a male actor, dressed in a sweeping gown, is wooed by “her” rustic swain. Photograph selected by costumier Melanie Ransom on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

A.D. Rogers Photo, around 1910, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Minstrels – 5/17/2020

Chimes of Normandy – 5/3/2020

Our focus this month is Thurston County’s long love affair with amateur theatrics. In this image from 1888, members of the St. John’s Musical Society perform a number from the operetta The Chimes of Normandy.  It was staged at Columbia Hall, one of the earliest performing arts venues in Olympia. Proceeds of the production helped in the acquisition of a pipe organ for the church. Photograph selected by costumier Melanie Ransom on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

A.D. Rogers Photo, 1888, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Chimes of Normandy – 5/3/2020

Bulletin – 4/1/2020

April 1, 2020      
 
As we are all now aware, most public venues, including museums, etc., have been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This bi-monthly Bulletin will now go on hiatus until the pandemic has subsided and these restrictions are lifted, with periodic deliveries in the interim for appropriate events readers may enjoy while observing these essential contact limitations. Highlighted below are just some of the  interesting online activities, events and resources you may participate in and enjoy.

 
Bigelow House Museum will remain closed until further notice.
 
Maintain that distance!
 
Stay safe!
 
STAY WELL!!!
________________________________________________________________

  • April 13 – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society: Musical History of Tacoma. 

Join the Tacoma Historical Society online for their Annual Meeting, which will be broadcasted live online due to current restrictions on public gatherings. The guest speaker this month will be Kim Davenport, who will share stories and music from her research into the Musical History of Tacoma. THS will share the link for the online broadcast HERE. Even if you miss watching it live, a video will be available for posterity afterwards.

  • Washington State Library – Washington State Research.

The Washington State Library has an amazing online presence for researching WA on all levels. Their Washington State Research page is an excellent starting point, and can be reached HERE.

  • Smithsonian Magazine Online: Virtual Travel – Ten Museums You Can Virtually Visit. 

The Smithsonian Institution has put together an excellent list of museums from across the globe which have terrific online content. Ranging from the Smithsonian itself in Washington DC, to the National Women’s History Museum in Alexandria, VA, to the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, Spain, and the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, there’s a lot to absorb, learn, and enjoy. The list can be found on the Magazine’s web site HERE.

  • Now Where Were We – YouTube Video Channel Dedicated to Local History. 

This is a series of videos about the history of Olympia and Lacey, Washington and surrounding areas. The videos are produced at PCTV, the television station for Panorama, a retirement community in Lacey, Washington. The host for the series is Deborah Ross, a local historian and author. The videos may be accessed on YouTube HERE.

  • Washington State History Museum – Online Collections. 

For the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic the Washington State History Museum is closed, but they encourage you to make good use of their online collections database! Pick a topic of interest, type in your search term (try dogs or WWI for example) and see what comes up! Begin your Washington History Search HERE.

  • Washington State Library – Primarily Washington.

Described as Washington’s Gateway to Pacific Northwest Primary Source Materials for Teachers and Students, Primarily Washington provides access to a huge array of information about our beautiful Evergreen State! The site can be found HERE.

  • Library of Congress – By the People. 

Want to help create the historical record?  How about doing some online transcribing of documents for the Library of Congress! What could be more fascinating? From papers written by Anna Dickinson, suffragist, abolitionist and the first woman to deliver a political address to the US congress, to Herencia, a collection of centuries of Spanish legal documents obtained by the Library in 1941, you will definitely find something here to pique your interests. These fascinating documents are just waiting for your attention, and can be found HERE.

  • Washington State Archives – What is Scribe?

Washington State also needs your transcription skills! Visit the Archives HERE to set up an account and get started!

  • Washington Rural Heritage – Community Digital Archives for Washington State.  

Washington Rural Heritage is a community memory project headquartered at the Washington State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State. The project brings together unique local history materials from libraries, museums, and private collections of citizens across Washington State. Search by community/county, format or date; if it’s central to rural WA, you will find it here! The archives can be accessed HERE.

  • Washington Secretary of State – Washington State Digital Archives.  

The Washington State Digital Archives are the nation’s first archives dedicated specifically to the preservation of electronic records from both State and Local agencies that have permanent legal, fiscal or historical value. Much of the archive can be accessed and searched HERE.

  • Washington State Council for the Social Studies – Washington State History.  

And if you were not able to find anything in one of the sites above to intrigue you during distancing, check out the many fascinating Washington State Council for the Social Studies Curriculum Links, which can be visited HERE.

  • KNKX Public Radio and the Washington State History Museum – Forgotten Prison: The Alcatraz You’ve Never Heard of.  

An excellent 6 part podcast on the now-abandoned prison on McNeil Island which operated for 136 years, just across the Sound from Lakewood. The podcast can be accessed HERE.
 

Stay Safe – Stay Well – MAINTAIN THAT DISTANCE!
David Ponta
Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum
OHS&BHM PO Box 1821 Olympia, WA 98507
To unsubscribe, send us an e-mail: olyhistory@gmail.com
Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 4/1/2020

4/12/2020 – Mann’s Seeds

Frank Sparks looks over an antique prescription case in this photograph from 1965. His grandfather was Champion Mann, who first operated a pharmacy downtown, and later opened Mann’s Seeds, at the current location of Rainy Day Records on 5th Avenue. Sparks was closing the store after many years of operation, the victim of mass production and distribution of seed. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, February 1965, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 4/12/2020 – Mann’s Seeds

4/5/2020 – Abbie Howard Hunt Stuart

Abbie Howard Hunt, born and college-educated in Massachusetts, came west to seek a career. She eventually married Robert Stuart, a Federal lands commissioner, and moved to Olympia. Abbie was an ardent suffragist who founded one of the first women’s clubs on the west coast, the Olympia Woman’s Club. Its clubhouse on Washington Street is named for her, as are Stuart Apartments downtown, the site of the Stuarts’ home. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Ida B. Smith photo, 1900, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 4/5/2020 – Abbie Howard Hunt Stuart

3/29/2020 – Lurana Percival

Meet Lurana Ware Percival. The Percivals were early arrivals to Olympia. Samuel Wing Percival operated a lumber mill and store, and established Percival Wharf, now Percival Landing, in order to receive and transport merchandise to and from his operations. An apartment building, the Laurana, located at the southern end of Percival Landing, honors Mrs. Percival (with an alternate spelling of her first name). Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Joseph Buchtel, around 1870, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 3/29/2020 – Lurana Percival

3/15/2020 – Marlon Brando is arrested

In March 1964, Marlon Brando arrived in our area to support Native American tribes as they challenged the state’s interpretation of fishing treaty rights. He was arrested for his efforts. He’s shown here in the Thurston County Courthouse, consulting with Puyallup tribe member Robert Satiacum.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 3/15/2020 – Marlon Brando is arrested

Abbreviations, legends and keys used in Sanborn colored maps

These are abbreviations used in Sanborn colored maps. Link here for abbreviations used in black and white maps.

Posted in Historic map overlays | Comments Off on Abbreviations, legends and keys used in Sanborn colored maps

Abbreviations used on Black and White Sanborn Maps

These are abbreviations used by the Sanborn company in its black and white maps. Link here for abbreviations used in colored maps

 

Posted in Historic map overlays | Comments Off on Abbreviations used on Black and White Sanborn Maps

Bulletin – 3/1/2020

March 1, 2020

We have some terrific History related events coming up in the first two weeks of March. From boating and banking to trees and treaties, there’s a little something for everyone to learn and enjoy!

__________________________________________________________________

· March 4, 5:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): McMenamins Elks Temple History Pub – The Boys in the Boat: A Daughter Remembers.

The 1936 Summer Olympics are infamous for having taken place in Berlin, Germany, three years after Adolph Hitler came to power. Hitler vigorously attempted to use the Olympics to showcase and promote the Nazi state, with noted German film maker Leni Riefenstahl producing a two part movie titled Olympia, released in 1938, highlighting the event. Most noted for her 1935 pro-Hitler propaganda film Triumph of the Will, which promoted the dictator on a personal level, some critics at the time of Olympia’s release suggested that Riefenstahl had given a similar heroic portrayal to African American athlete Jesse Owens in the film. This is said to have not gone over well with the Nazi regime; Owens’ stellar performance infuriated Hitler, as it contradicted the notion of “Aryan Supremacy” which was central to Nazi ideology. Widely praised around the globe at the time of its release, Olympia was not shown in the US until 1940. And while Germany did win the largest number of medals in the 1936 Summer Olympics, with a total of 89 received, 33 being gold, the US came in second, with 56 medals won, 24 of which were gold. Among those taking home gold was the US rowing team, made up of nine young men from the State of Washington. Daniel James Brown’s critically acclaimed non-fiction novel The Boys in the Boat celebrates the 1936 U.S. men’s Olympic eight-oar rowing team. Nine working class boys from the Pacific Northwest stormed the rowing world, transformed the sport, and galvanized the attention of millions of Americans. Hear an explanation of the book’s genesis and stories from the daughter of Joe Rantz, one of those working class boys who made history. This event is free, and all ages are welcome to attend. Doors open at 5:30 PM. McMenamins Elks Temple is located at 565 Broadway, Tacoma.

· March 5, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society (Tacoma): Exhibit Opening and Book Launch – Bank on Tacoma: 1873-1993.

Join the Tacoma Historical Society Museum for the opening of their latest exhibit, Bank on Tacoma: 1873-1993, celebrating Tacoma’s rich banking history and unique financial challenges.

During the exhibit opening, the Society will also be celebrating the release of a new book by Deborah K. Freedman. Based on in-depth original research, Bank on Tacoma: 1873-1993 chronicles more than a century of banking history in Tacoma, Washington, which parallels the city’s growth and development. Free, all are welcome! This event is taking place at the Tacoma Historical Society Museum, 919 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma.

· March 7, 6:00 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Dance to Make a Difference 12th Annual Charity Gala.

Studio West Dance Theatre and Guild presents the 12th annual Dance to Make a Difference charity gala. This year, all net proceeds will be donated to Homeless Backpacks and Homes First. Both non-profit organizations provide support for homeless and low-income families in the South Sound community. The reception begins at 6:00 PM and includes a light dinner, wine, and live music. A silent auction will be held during the reception and intermission. At 8:00 PM, you are invited to the main-stage to enjoy a fantastic dance performance by Studio West Dance Theatre, Ballet Northwest, EDGE, Evergreen City Ballet, Johansen Olympia Dance Center, Momentum, Olympic Ballroom Dance, Powers Ballroom, Southwest Washington Dance

Ensemble, and Vibes Kru. The gala will feature a brand new choreographic work by Joshua Grant, soloist with Pacific Northwest Ballet. For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia.

· March 8, 2:00 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Silent Movie – The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Based on French author Victor Hugo’s 1831 novel of the same name, this epic 1923 silent film is recognized for its stunning sets depicting Paris in the 1400’s, and for Lon Chaney’s remarkable performance and make up as the tormented Quasimodo. World-class theater organist Dennis James brings the film to life on the theater’s historic 1924 treasure, The Mighty Andy Crow Wurlitzer Organ. For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia.

· March 9, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society (Tacoma): Bruce Ramsey – Tacoma’s Experience of the Panic of 1893.

To complement their new exhibit on banking history, the author of The Panic of 1893 will recall the depression that devastated Tacoma just as the city was getting started. If you don’t yet have your copy of Bruce Ramsey’s book, the University of Puget Sound Bookstore will be on hand at the event to sell copies! This event is taking place at the Murray Board Room, Wheelock Student Center, University of Puget Sound, located at 1500 N Warner St, Tacoma.

· March 12, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House presents Women Who Dared.

Visit History Talks at Schmidt House for a discussion of early non-native female settlers in the Northwest. Guest speaker, author and former history teacher Dorothy “Dot” Wilson will answer questions such as who these women were, why they come here, and where they come from. Her talk will bring to life the stories of these brave women who dared to risk all to explore and pave the way for our pioneer ancestors. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit https://olytumfoundation.org/what-we-do/schmidt-house/ The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· March 14. 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. PNW Chapter of International Coleman Collectors Club (Lacey): 15th Annual Display of Vintage Coleman Lanterns, Stoves, and More.

So, you thought you’d heard of just about every possible specialized collector organization imaginable? Think again. There’s a group which is fixated solely upon Coleman products. And apparently, they are not even limited to the good ol’ USA. At this event, members of the PNW Chapter of the International Coleman Collectors Club will be displaying their collections of vintage Coleman lanterns, lamps, stoves, coolers and other items made by the company. Most remembered for fun things like camping equipment and other outdoor activity gear, Coleman also produced military items such as canteens, stoves and mess kits, but also more obscure equipment, like inflatable vests used by the Navy. Do you have a non-working Coleman item? Bring it in and Club members can show you how to get it operating again. Some collectors may have a few sales items. The event is family-friendly with numerous giveaways of new Coleman items. Also a raffle for a new Coleman ice chest! Taking place at the Best Western Plus Lacey Inn & Suites, 8326 Quinault Drive NE, Lacey.

· March 14. 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. WET Science Center and the Capital Land Trust (Olympia): Meet the Trees of Washington.

It’s called the EVERGREEN STATE for a reason.* TREES! Much of Washington is adorned with the big beauties, but what makes up that glorious veil of green? Come and learn about Washington’s forests! Join Capitol Land Trust for a presentation about trees as you sort leaves and identify the native trees of our state. Nature-related activities will be happening all day. This event is free, and is taking place at the WET Science Center (LOTT), 500 Adams St. NE, Olympia.

*Realtor and former newspaperman Charles Tallmadge Conover coined the phrase The Evergreen State, while working as chairman of the publicity committee of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce in the late 1800’s. His motivation had less to do with extolling our state’s stunning natural beauty than it did with the belief that the nickname would bring more settlers (i.e., home buyers) to the state. To accomplish this, Conover and business partner Samuel L. Crawford, along with Sound historian Frederic Grant produced the promotional booklet “Washington, The Evergreen State and Seattle, its Metropolis,” titled by Conover.

· March 14, 7:00 PM. South Puget Sound Community College, Kenneth J. Minnaert Center (Olympia): Peace Festival – A Celebration of Peace Through Music.

Under the motto Peace though Music. Quality through Inclusion, the Olympia Peace Choir has been a voice for global awareness, social consciousness, and environmental stewardship for a decade. With the resounding theme of It Takes a Village, this 100-voice community chorus will gather with choirs from around the Puget Sound in a joyful, inspiring celebration of peace through music. Guest choirs include the SPSCC Chorus and Vashon’s Free Range Folk Choir. As a service to the Olympia community, all Peace Choir performances are free and family-friendly. The Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· March 15, 2:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom (Lakewood): The 1854 Medicine Creek Treaty.

The Treaty of Medicine Creek was an agreement between the United States and the Nisqually, Puyallup, Steilacoom, Squawskin (Squaxin Island), S’Homamish, Stehchass, T’Peeksin, Squi-aitl, and Sa-heh-wamish nations which, under the treaty, were “regarded as one nation, on behalf of said tribes and bands, and duly authorized by them.” The treaty granted 2.24 million acres of land to the United States in exchange for the establishment of three reservations, cash payments over a period of twenty years, and recognition of traditional native fishing and hunting rights in the area. The privileges granted to the tribes were disputed until the Boldt Decision in 1974, which recognized native rights to half of the fish caught on traditional lands throughout the South Sound. Prior to Boldt, the tribes had been allowed much less. In addition, the initial rocky location of the Nisqually reservation was unacceptable to that nation, traditionally a riverside fishing people. The tribe went to war over this in 1855, which culminated in Nisqually Chief Leschi being hanged for murder. Leschi was exonerated in 2004, some 150 years later. Despite not being fully honored by non-natives until the 1970’s, the construction of Interstate 5 was redirected in the ’60’s to avoid destruction of the treaty signing location in Thurston County. The site, now in the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, was designated by Congress as the Medicine Creek Treaty National Memorial on December 18, 2015. Washington State Historian Erich Ebel will speak on the 1854 Medicine Creek Treaty at this event, taking place at Quarters 2. Admission to the lecture is free, but donations are always appreciated, and guided tours will be available for the standard fee. Historic Fort Steilacoom is located on the grounds of Western State Hospital at 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood, 253-582-583.

__________________________________________________________________

Built in the fascinating Carpenter Gothic style in the 1850’s by Daniel Bigelow, an attorney and politician in Olympia, no history buff should miss touring the Bigelow House Museum. One of the oldest residential buildings in the North West, the House was added to the

National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Each guided tour lasts approximately 45 minutes, and after visiting the House, your name will be added to a long list of historically significant individuals including Snoqualmie Chief Patkanim, Suffragist Susan B. Anthony, and Confederate Army General George Edward Pickett, perhaps best know for the ill-fated Pickett’s Charge on the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. The Museum is located at 918 Glass Ave NE in Olympia. For our current tour schedule, please visit https://olympiahistory.org/calendar-of-events/ .

 

Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 3/1/2020

CC and Asenath Ann Kennedy Simmons – 3/8/2020

In 1864, Asenath Ann Kennedy and Christopher Columbus (CC) Simmons eloped via a “rudely fashioned rowboat.” Asenath Ann was only 14, and CC 19. Legend has it that Asenath Ann placed a piece of paper inscribed with the number 18 in her shoe, so she could answer the preacher truthfully when he asked “Are you over 18?” The couple lived to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Unknown photographer, about 1864, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on CC and Asenath Ann Kennedy Simmons – 3/8/2020

Makah protestors – 3/1/2020

As the “fish wars” asserting Native American fishing rights heated up in the mid-1960s, protests regularly occurred at the Legislative Building. In this photograph from March 1964, a group of Makah Indians performed as dance as part of one such event. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Makah protestors – 3/1/2020

Road Runners – 2/23/2020

Roadrunners of Olympia was a hot rod club for teenage boys, aimed at “giving teenage boys good things to do.” The boys helped motorists, engaged in car talk, and enjoyed cruising the 4th Avenue and State Street circuit downtown. Members pictured here with club advisor Officer Oscar Schultz include Ernie Main, John Bert, Mike Faber, Pat Shay, Mike Wood, and Andy Miller. President Will Wolf, now 83, is at right of second row. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

1952 photo donated by Marcia and Will Wolf

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Road Runners – 2/23/2020

Olympia High School Band – 2/16/2020

Music has always been an important feature of Olympia life. In this photo from around 1915, instructor Benjamin McClelland is seated with members of the Olympia High School Band.  McClelland’s home on the West Side is on the local heritage register. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Collier Photo, about 1915, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Olympia High School Band – 2/16/2020

Bulletin – 2/15/2020

February 15, 2020

This month is the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the US constitution, empowering women to vote! Join the League of Women Voters of Thurston County and the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum at a special event on February 15 celebrating the centenary of this vital amendment. This event will be held at the Bigelow House Museum, 918 Glass Avenue NE, Olympia, from 1 to 3 PM. Admission is by donation. Both the 200th anniversary of suffragist Susan B. Anthony’s birth and the 100th anniversary of the League of Women Voters will also be marked by this event. The program begins at 1:30 PM, and visitors will enjoy displays, music, and refreshments. Historic costumes are encouraged! Susan B. Anthony visited the Bigelow House in 1871, and the League was formed on February 14, 1920. For more information, visit www.olympiahistory.org

In honor of Black History Month, Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will co-sponsor a special program with the Olympia Heritage Commission titled Blacks in Thurston County: A Historical Perspective, presented by Dr. Thelma Jackson and Ed Echtle. This event is taking place on Saturday February 22, 2020 at 1:30 PM in Rooms 101-102 of the Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW in Olympia. Free to the public! Information is available at www.olympiahistory.org.

__________________________________________________________________

George Washington and Centralia

George Washington was born in Virginia in 1817, the son of a black slave and a British woman. George’s mother left the boy with Anna and James Cochran/Cochrane, a white couple, who moved to Missouri with George, by way of Ohio. Washington’s business efforts in that area were impeded by the many racist laws then in place. Seeking greater liberty, George Washington moved west in 1850 via wagon train, eventually arriving in what would soon become the Washington Territory. In 1852, Washington opened a land claim in the Territory near the confluence of the Chehalis and Skookumchuck Rivers, where he would later establish the town of Centralia. Washington met and married Mary Jane Cooness/Cornie when in his 50’s, a widow of African American and Jewish ancestry. Realizing that their land’s location would be an important access point for the Northern Pacific Railroad between Kalama on the Columbia and Tacoma, the Washingtons endeavored to start a town on the site. On January 8, 1875, the family registered the plat for their town at the Lewis County courthouse in Chehalis, initially calling it “Centerville,” and later added more plats to increase the town’s size. The Washingtons donated space to their Baptist parish to construct a church and a cemetery, and also established a public square, now known as George Washington Park, located at 110 South Silver Street in Centralia. The town’s initial name of Centerville caused some confusion, since a town by that name already existed in Klickitat County, and the name was changed to Centralia in the early 1880’s. Centralia went on to be incorporated in 1886. When the Washington Territory became a state in 1889, Centralia had nearly 1,000 residents, a figure which more than tripled in the next two years. George’s wife Mary Jane Washington passed away in 1888. Washington remained an

active area civic leader, often cited for his willingness to help area residents in numerous ways, such as selling property for a small down payment, providing no-interest loans, and offering employment options when few were available. During the national economic downturn of 1893, George established private relief efforts for locals in need, frequently wagon trained into Oregon in order to bring back needed supplies ranging from rice and flour to sugar, and gave away bacon and lard he obtained in Chehalis. Washington did not evict residents for being late on mortgage payments, and bought up area properties which became available during the crash in order to increase the town’s size. By the end of the 19th century, Centralia began to recover economically, and though property values and residency had declined during the financial downturn, Centralia had about 1,600 residents in 1900. The town’s current population is estimated to be approximately 18,000. George Washington died on August 26, 1905, remaining active in local affairs up until his passing. He was 11 days short of his 88th birthday. The town of Centralia recognized George at the time of his death with a public funeral said to be the most attended in the city’s history. Washington’s service took place at the Baptist church he had helped establish, and he is buried in the Washington Lawn Cemetery, located at 706 West Pear Street in Centralia, which he had donated to the parish many years before.

__________________________________________________________________

· February 15, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.

Please join the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, and the Thurston County League of Women Voters, for a celebration of the centenary of the women’s vote. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

· February 15, 2:00 PM. Olympia Family Theater (Olympia): Starry Messenger.

This stirring adaptation of the Newbery Award-winning book is set in Copenhagen in 1943. Young Annemarie and her family face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and face their darkest fears as they try to help their friend Ellen escape the Nazis across the ocean to safety in Sweden. Witness all the drama, adventure, and humor come to life on our stage that have made Number the Stars a national bestseller. Based on the Book by Lois Lowry, adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche & directed by Samantha Chandler. This show is recommended for ages 6 and over. For event Info, call (360) 570-1638 Admission is $20. The Olympia Family Theater is located at 612 4th Ave E, Olympia.

· February 15, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Lemay Car Museum (Tacoma): Unguarded Art Auction.

Incarcerated artists in prisons across Washington are raising money for social justice causes and victims of domestic violence through the Unguarded Art Auction at LeMay Car Museum. Admission is $10 and includes parking, partial museum access, tapas, and one drink ticket.

Attendees will be able to bid on more than 200 pieces of inmate-made art, including paintings, sculptures and Native American beading. All proceeds will be split among the YWCAs of Pierce, Kitsap, Seattle, King and Snohomish counties. Sponsors for the event include United HealthCare Community Plan, Department of Corrections, Pierce County Community Partnership for Transition Services and Numbers2Names, and the Washington State Combined Fund Drive. For more information, visit https://doc.wa.gov/news/2020/01242020.htm The Lemay Car Museum is located at 2702 East D. Street, Tacoma.

· February 20, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House

presents George Washington of Centralia.

Visit History Talks at Schmidt House for a discussion of the book George Washington of Centralia, presented by authors Brian Mittge and Kerry MacGregor Serl. Signed copies of their book will be available following the presentation. For more information about George

Washington and his role in the origin of Centralia, please see the header at the top of this Bulletin. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit https://olytumfoundation.org/what-we-do/schmidt-house/ The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· February 20, 3:00 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): Free Third Thursday!

On the Third Thursday of every month, admission to the Washington State History Museum is FREE OF CHARGE after 3:00 PM. For a list of upcoming events, visithttp://www.washingtonhistory.org/events.aspx?id=0 The Washington State History museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, (253) 272-3500.

· February 21, 4:30 AM – 6:30 PM. South Puget Sound Community College, Leonor R. Fuller Gallery (Olympia): Native American Art Exhibition Opening Reception.

SPSCC is pleased to welcome the Native American Art Exhibition back to the Leonor R. Fuller Gallery at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The exhibition will run from Feb. 18 – March 20, 2020, with the opening reception taking place Friday, Feb. 21, from 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM. This themed exhibition, shaped and selected by Native guest curators, engages viewers and the community celebrating the arts and culture of our Native community members. The exhibition will highlight work by adult and youth from local and regional tribes and Native artists from other locations who now live in the area. The exhibition is sponsored by the Nisqually Indian Tribe. The Gallery is open Monday through Friday from noon to 6:00 PM, excluding holidays. The Leonor R. Fuller Gallery at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· February 21, 7:30 PM. University of Puget Sound Schneebeck Concert Hall (Tacoma): Puget Sound Jacobsen Series – The Legacy of George Walker.

Dr. Gregory Walker, violinist, joins University of Puget Sound music faculty for this celebration of music by his father, George Walker (1922–2018), the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Performed by Gwynne Brown, piano; Kim Davenport, piano; Alistair MacRae, cello; Dawn Padula, mezzo-soprano; Joyce Ramee, viola; Tanya Stambuk, piano; Joseph Williams, piano; Jinshil Yi, piano. This event is taking place at the University of Puget Sound Schneebeck Concert Hall, 1500 N Warner St, Tacoma.

· February 22, 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Heritage Skills Workshop – Basketry.

Judy Bridges, a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, will lead a hands-on workshop in which participants will learn the basics of plaiting, twining and coiling cedar. Judy is descended from five fur traders and their Native American wives. She took up basketry in the early 1990’s, studying with both native and non-native teachers. Judy has been teaching and demonstrating basketry for nearly two decades, using both traditional and modern materials. You are invited to bring your own sack lunch to this event. Admission is $65, open to those ages 16 and older. Pre-registration required, visit http://apm.activecommunities.com/metroparkstacoma/Activity_Search/9069 . For more

information contact (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

· February 22, 1:30 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): Blacks in Thurston County.

Please join the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, and the Olympia Heritage Commission for a discussion of Black history in Thurston County. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

· February 24, 7:30 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Beatles Vs. Stones – A Musical Showdown.

Back by popular demand! Celebrate the history of rock ‘n roll by visiting the Main Stage for a Battle of the Bands. Two of the greatest groups of all time face off in a high-energy, adrenaline-pumping musical showdown. The Fab Four, represented by tribute band Abbey Road will engage in a barrage of hits against premier Rolling Stones tribute band Satisfaction. It’s a face-off you won’t want to miss! For more information, visit https://www.washingtoncenter.org/event/20-02-24-beatles-vs-stones/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE , Olympia.

· February 26, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Harbor History Museum (Gig Harbor) – Who Was Chief Seattle?

David Buerge, historian, teacher, writer, and author of fourteen books of history and biography, has been researching the pre- and early history of the City of Seattle since the mid-1970’s. A biographer and a historian to the Duwamish Tribe of Chief Seattle, David has spent more than 20 years exploring the man from a variety of sources to reveal a leader of epic character. His latest book, Chief Seattle and the Town that Took His Name, is the first biography of Chief Seattle intended for adults. Seattle wrote nothing down during his life, yet his words – both real and imagined – are known throughout the world. The result is a man made up of both historical and fictional aspects, from which conflicting messages can be gleaned. Visit the Harbor History Museum for an authoritative and insightful discussion of this fascinatingly significant leader.

Admission is free, but seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, contact operations@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722. The Harbor History Museum is located at 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor.

Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 2/15/2020

Bulletin – 2/1/2020

February 1, 2020

This month is the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the US constitution, empowering women to vote! Join the League of Women Voters of Thurston County and the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum at a special event on February 15 celebrating the centenary of this vital amendment. This event will be held at the Bigelow House Museum, 918 Glass Avenue NE, Olympia, from 1 to 3 PM. Admission is by donation. Both the 200th anniversary of suffragist Susan B. Anthony’s birth and the 100th anniversary of the League of Women Voters will also be marked by this event. The program begins at 1:30 PM, and visitors will enjoy displays, music, and refreshments. Historic costumes are encouraged! Susan B. Anthony visited the Bigelow House in 1871, and the League was formed on February 14, 1920. For more information, visit www.olympiahistory.org

__________________________________________________________________

The practice of annually reflecting upon African-American history in the U.S. began in 1926, when the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, established in 1915, declared the 2nd week in February to be Negro History Week. February was officially recognized as Black History Month by President Gerald Ford in 1976, during the bicentennial celebration.

One of Washington state’s most significant early settlers of color was John Newington Conna. Born into slavery in 1836 in Augustine, TX to an Irish immigrant father and an unknown black mother, Conna became a free man during the Civil War, when he served in the 1st Louisiana Native Guards, an African-American Union Regiment. John Conna lived in Hartford, Connecticut, and later Kansas City, Kansas, before taking the new transcontinental railroad to Tacoma in 1883 when he, his wife, Mary, and their children became the first African-Americans to travel by train to Puget Sound, eventually occupying a 157-acre homestead on the south side of Panther Lake, just north of Tacoma. Not long after settling in the area, Conna began working for Allen C. Mason real estate, becoming its leading broker. Allen Mason himself was also an interesting Tacoman, and initially one of the area’s most successful businessmen. In the panic of 1893 Mason, then 37 years old and generally considered a person of integrity, stood by his promise to buy back houses from anyone who could no longer afford them, losing all of his money in the process. Conna, finding success in the field, opened his own real estate firm In 1890. He also recruited African-Americans from other parts of the country to migrate to the Pacific Northwest, including coal miners who settled in Roslyn. Conna soon entered politics as president of the John Brown Republican Club and the Washington State Protective League. He joined the local chapter of the Afro-American League, a group which eventually led to the NAACP. In 1889, Conna became the first African-American in Washington state to be appointed to the Washington State Legislature when he was selected as Sergeant at Arms for the Legislature’s very first assembly. In that position, he was central to the creation of the Public Accommodations Act of 1890, which gave all citizens the right to access public establishments such as restaurants, inns, and public transport. John and wife Mary also donated some 40 acres of land to the City of Tacoma, an area referred to today as the Conna Addition. Like many Americans, John caught “Gold Fever” at the age of 64, and relocated to Fairbanks, Alaska towards the end of the Klondike gold rush, where he also worked in real estate and other investments. Conna ran unsuccessfully for the Fairbanks City Council and the Alaska Territorial Senate. One of Alaska’s last living Civil War veterans, John Newington Conna died in 1921 at age 85. He is buried in the historic Clay Street Cemetery in Fairbanks.

__________________________________________________________________

· February 3, 7:30 PM. Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage (Olympia): Love in the Time of the Civil War.

The South Puget Sound Community College Artist & Lecture Series continues with author and educator Dolen Perkins-Valdez’s lecture on the topic of Love in the Time of the Civil War. Perkins-Valdez is acclaimed for her best-selling debut novel Wench, a complicated story that explores the moral complexities of slavery. Wench was awarded the First Novelist Award by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association in 2011. Dolen teaches in the Stonecoast MFA program in the state of Maine, and is a popular guest for Black History and Women’s Month programs. A graduate of Harvard and a former University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at UCLA, Dolen lives in Washington, DC with her family. For more information, visit Washington Center Main Stage The Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· February 4 & 5, 9:00 AM – 8:00 PM & 7:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Washington State Historical Society (Olympia): Arts, Heritage & Science Days.

Join the Washington State Historical Society for two days of workshops and networking in Olympia. There will be presentations on celebrating women’s suffrage in your community, the Heritage Capital Projects grant, tips for emergency preparedness and a small museums roundtable covering topics including collections care, volunteer recruitment and membership programs. The workshops will be followed by a reception hosted by the Washington Museum Association. The cost is for the event on the 4th is $15, which includes lunch, the events on the 5th are free. For the full schedule and registration information for both dates, visit Arts, Heritage & Science Days February 4 events are taking place at the Lord Mansion, 211 21st Ave SW, Olympia, the February 5 events are taking place at the Cherborg conference rooms A,B, & C, 304 15th Ave SW, Olympia.

· February 4, 5:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): McMenamins Elks Temple History Pub – Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Principal’s Office?

Beginning as early as preschool, Black students are disproportionately suspended and expelled from school. As many of these students reach adulthood, these punishments can lead to what some call the School-to-Prison Pipeline that affects many Black communities. Why are Black students punished more than others in the classroom? Based on his extensive research and teaching experience, Dr. Daudi Abe, a professor, writer, and historian who holds an MA in human development and holds a PhD in education from the University of Washington, demonstrates that the racial achievement gap cannot be solved without first addressing the discipline gap. Crucial questions must be faced: What is the difference between subjective and objective forms of discipline? What is “academic self-esteem” and “Cool Pose?” And in a state where 90% of teachers are white and the student body is only 56% white, would a more diverse teaching staff help? Does the discipline gap affect other communities of color? And what solutions can we can learn to help ALL students succeed? This event is free, and all ages are welcome to attend. Doors open at 5:30 PM. McMenamins Elks Temple is located at 565 Broadway, Tacoma.

· February 6, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House presents Cowlitz Farm.

Visit History Talks at the Schmidt House for an illustrated discussion presented by Josiah Pollock about the Cowlitz Farm in Lewis County, a part of the Puget Sound Agricultural Company. Pollock, a historian with the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum in Tacoma, will highlight the Farm’s connection to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the key role the Farm played in the development of Washington state. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis

and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit www.olytumfoundation.org The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· February 6 & 8, 14 & 15, 6:00 PM, 7:45 PM, 9:30 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Arrested – Escape Fort Nisqually.

Enter the fort by candlelight and embark on an epic adventure through time in Tacoma’s newest escape room experience. Arrested: Escape Fort Nisqually, a sequel to the Fort’s critically-acclaimed and award-winning escape game, Trapped, transports players back in time once again. Your team will race against the clock to recover company secrets before they fall into the wrong hands. Arrested can accommodate 10 people per game and lasts approximately 1 hour. Tickets are $30 person, ages 14 and up. For more information contact (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

· February 11, 5:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): Latinx Labor & Immigrant Rights Panel Discussion

Visit the Washington State History Museum for a panel discussion held in conjunction with the exhibit In Washington’s Fields: Photographs by David Bacon, featuring the captivating work of this photo journalist, author, activist and organizer. Following the panel conversation, Bacon will lead a tour through the exhibition, which opens February 1 and will be on view through May 10, 2020. The panel has been organized by Dr. Michael Honey, University of Washington Tacoma’s Haley Professor of Humanities and Labor Solidarity Project Chair. In addition to Bacon, panelists will include Rosalinda Guillen, director of Community2Community, which helped workers organize at Sakuma Farms, Ramon Torres, president of the new farm workers union Familias Unidas por la Justicia, and UWT Associate Professor Vanessa deVeritch Woodside. Farm workers and community members will also participate in the conversation about worker and immigrant rights in Washington State. Quoting Dr. Honey, “Immigrant’s and worker’s rights can hardly be separated in today’s climate of racism and repression at the border and in the notorious detention centers of ICE in Tacoma and elsewhere.” This exhibit and discussion are designed to shine a light on the continuing struggle of farm workers for a degree of dignity and justice. The Washington State History museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, (253) 272-3500.

· February 12, 5:30 PM. City of Lacey, Washington (Lacey): History Talks! The African American Legacy in Washington State.

To celebrate African American History Month, Lacey Museum is privileged to host retired University of Washington professor Dr. Quintard Taylor, with a presentation about the broader aspects of our region’s African American history. In 2004, Taylor created an online website resource center for African American history called BlackPast.org which contains an amazing array of information from encyclopedia-type entries and audio and video recordings to first-hand accounts of important events. He has also written numerous books and articles on African American history. This event is taking place at the Lacey City Hall Council Chambers, 420 College St SE., Lacey.

· February 14, 7:30 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Silent Movie – Lucky Star

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with someone special by visiting the Main Stage for a presentation of the silent classic Lucky Star, a powerful romance starring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell, once known as “America’s Favorite Lovebirds.” World-class theater organist Dennis James brings the film to life on the theater’s historic 1924 treasure, The Mighty Andy Crow Wurlitzer Organ. Make your Valentine’s Day a unique experience to remember! For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE , Olympia.

· February 15, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.

Please join the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, and the Thurston County League of Women Voters, for a celebration of the centenary of the women’s vote. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 2/1/2020

Port of Olympia – 2/2/2020

In February 1938, Ann Nielsen’s Scottish father was aboard the Pacific Pioneer, a British cargo ship that arrived at the Port of Olympia, loading fresh fruit and lumber bound for Great Britain, which was already on the verge of World War II. The port would have looked vastly different than it does today. This aerial from that timeframe shows oil tanks, veneer plants, warehouses, and a row of ships pulled up along Percival Dock. Photograph selected and captioned by Ann Nielsen on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Port of Olympia – 2/2/2020

Bulletin – 1/15/20

January 15, 2020

The Annual Meeting of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be held Saturday, January 25, from 1:00-3:00 PM at 405 Columbia Street SW in downtown Olympia, location of the Olympia Odd Fellows Lodge No. 1, which is co-sponsoring the event. There will be a program celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which empowered women to vote nationally. The program, open to the public, is entitled Olympia’s Role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement. We will also be recognizing the Olympia Lodge of Odd Fellows No. 1, The United Churches of Olympia, and the Ira L. Cater Post 318 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), for 100 or more years of service to the Olympia community. Finally, we will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Bigelow House designation on the National Register of Historic Places with refreshments. The program will be followed by the annual business meeting. Lots of anniversaries to celebrate–please join us! For more information, visit https://olympiahistory.org

________________________________________________________________________

· January 15, 7:00 AM – 8:00 AM. Washington State History Society (Tacoma): Heritage Caucus.

The Heritage Caucus meets regularly while the Washington State Legislature is in session to discuss heritage, arts, and other cultural and recreational issues. Organized in 1990, the Caucus is a bipartisan gathering of state legislators and other elected officials; staff from state heritage, arts, and cultural agencies, and nonprofit organizations; and citizens interested in supporting Washington’s culture, heritage and the arts. Among the topics discussed during this session will be Preservation of a Cultural Heritage Site at the Wenatchee River Confluence, with City of Wenatchee Mayor Frank Kuntz & Economic Development Director Steve King and Wenatchi P’Squosa Elder Randy Lewis. This event is taking place at the Cherberg Building, Room A-B-C, 304 15th Ave SW Olympia.

· January 15, 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM. Thurston County League of Women Voters (Olympia): Forum on the Census and Redistricting.

The 2020 Census will take place this year, and will be the first U.S. census to offer options to respond on line, by phone, or by writing. Among other things, the census will determine the number of seats for the U.S. House of representatives and the number of delegates for the Electoral College. In 2021, the State of Washington Redistricting Commission will use the census results to begin the process of “redistricting,” determining the number and geographical locations of congressional and state legislative districts. The League of Women Voters played a major role in the formation of Washington’s bipartisan Redistricting Commission. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information, visit Thurston County League of Women Voters at http://www.lwvthurston.org/ This event will take place at the Olympia Center, 222 Columbia Street NW, Olympia.

· January 16, 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM. Olympia World Affairs Council (Olympia): Speaker Series – Bolsonaro and the Resurgence of Brazilian Fascism.

Jonathan Warren, Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, will discuss how right-wing populism is on the rise globally, especially in those parts of the world which had aggressively embraced neoliberal modes of capitalism. Brazil is emblematic of this often very violent process. Examples include the assassination of political opponents, the harassment of critics of the status quo, ethnic-cleansing of indigenous peoples,

environmental plunder, mass extermination of working-class communities of color, and unprecedented levels of violence against women and people of different gender identities. Jonathan Warren will discuss how this movement caught most off guard, both in and outside of Brazil, in large measure because they misunderstood the source of the economic uptick in the 2000’s, underestimated the fatigue people had with violence and corruption, misread the reasons for the rise of evangelical Christianity, ignored the authoritarianism at the heart of Brazilian day to day culture, and failed to appreciate the centrality of racism to Brazilian society. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://www.olympiawac.org/ This event is taking place at the SPSCC Lacey campus, Thurston Economic Development Council, 4220 6th Ave SE Lacey

· January 18, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Heritage Skills Workshop – Butchering and Curing.

Sign-up now for this heritage skills workshop to learn skills in butchering and curing methods from the 19th Century. The instructors from Farmstead Meatsmith will demonstrate traditional seam-butchery where only knives and cleavers are used. Participants will learn how waste is completely eliminated through traditional methods. There will also be a focus on principles of traditional nitrate-free whole-muscle curing, starting bacon, prosciutto and guanciale. Finally, the workshop will focus on basic cooking methods and how all this work ultimately serves the home table. This class is a day-long, intimate observational experience, with occasional hands-on opportunities. Bring your own sack lunch and filming/recording devices. Open to ages 16+ admission price is $100. Pre-registration is required, which can be done online by visiting http://apm.activecommunities.com/metroparkstacoma/Activity_Search/9068. For more information call (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

· January 19, 2:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom (Lakewood): Winter Storms at the Fort.

Historian and author Dennis Larsen will speak on winter storms affecting life at the Fort. Quarters 2 at 2 p.m. Complimentary admission to lecture, donations are accepted, and guided tours available for the standard fee. And speaking of DONATIONS, do you have any used books you’d like to give to a good cause? The Historic Fort Steilacoom Association conducts an annual used book sale. If you have used books you would like to dispose of your donation will support the research center of the museum. Donations will be accepted on the following dates: 1/5, 1/19, 2/2, 3/1 & 3/15. Donations may be delivered to Quarters 2. Contact info@historicfortsteilacoom.org for more information. Historic Fort Steilacoom is located on the grounds of Western State Hospital at 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood, 253-582-583.

· January 20, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day at the Museum!

Join the Washington State History Museum in honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr! Admission to the museum and all activities will be FREE on this day. Tacoma Arts Live’s Civil Rights Tour will present two performances of Get on the Bus, at 1:30 PM & 3:30 PM. Seating is limited. Participate in art making throughout the day. Explore the exhibition Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth. and learn about other African American men who have changed culture and history in our nation. Join ONYX Fine Arts Collective artists to learn about their unique styles which celebrate and promote the visual artwork of artists of African descent. Families can try their own hands on art making. The Write253 Pop Up Print Shop will also be open. The Washington State History museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, (253) 272-3500.

· January 20, 7:00 PM. Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage (Olympia): King and “The More Perfect Union.”

Join South Puget Sound Community College and historian Dr. Rich Benjamin this Martin Luther King Jr. Day for a lecture titled King and “The More Perfect Union,” part of the 2019-20 Artist & Lecture Series. Dr. Rich Benjamin is a sharp observer of modern society and politics and is the author of Searching for Whitopia: An Improbable Journey to the Heart of White America. For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· January 23, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House presents The Mason County History Museum.

Mason county’s history is emblematic of the South Sound in many ways, including timber, oysters, shipping, and railroads. Schmidt House welcomes former director of the Mason County History Museum Kristin Fabry to History Talks, during which she will focus on the history of Mason county with stories brought to life in the Museum. Kristin’s illustrated presentation may inspire viewers to personally visit the Mason County History Museum in Shelton. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit www.olytumfoundation.org The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· January 25, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): Annual Meeting.

Please join us for our ANNUAL MEETING, taking place at the historically significant Olympia Odd Fellows Lodge No. 1 in downtown Olympia. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

· January 29, 5:30 PM. City of Lacey, Washington (Lacey): History Talks! Lacey’s Role in Radio History.

Longtime broadcaster and community activist Dick Pust will discuss how one of the first radio stations in the nation got its start in Lacey. Illustrated with many historic images, he will also share how radio helped shape the lives of local residents. Pust, who spent more than 50 years in local broadcasting, will share his personal recollections including that time Hollywood superstar Bob Hope visited Lacey in the 1970’s. This event is taking place at the Lacey City Hall Council Chambers, 420 College St SE., Lacey.

Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 1/15/20

Sherwood Press – 1/19/20

Jocelyn Dohm founded the Sherwood Press in 1940 to produce high-quality printed material using traditional techniques. Here, in a photo from 1964, Miss Dohm is creating stationery for the Olympia branch of the American Association of University Women. AAUW member Mrs. Walter Vitous looks on appreciatively. The Sherwood Press is still in operation, now under the able management of Jamie Heinricher. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, October 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sherwood Press – 1/19/20

Ted Burntrager – 1/12/20

Ted Burntrager, long-time Olympia resident, demonstrates how to mount a “pennyfarthing,” or high wheeled bicycle. The bicycle was on display at Talcott Jewelers, a long-time Olympia store that sold jewelry, bicycles, and everything in between. The bicycle would have been an antique at the time the photograph was taken. Fittingly, the Talcott Jewelers building is now a downtown bicycle shop. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

unknown photographer, around 1950s, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Ted Burntrager – 1/12/20

Jeannette Whitcher pays it forward – 1/5/20

Jeannette Whitcher understood the concept of “pay it forward” before it became a byword. In this January 1964 photo, she and Olympia Vocational Technical Institute classmate Paul Golden view a pile of wrapped gifts. The Golden family had lost all of their Christmas gifts in a fire, and Mrs. Whitcher organized a drive to replace them. Her family had experienced a similar loss and resulting community support several years before.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. Daily Olympian photo, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Jeannette Whitcher pays it forward – 1/5/20

Bulletin – 1/1/20

January 1, 2020

The Annual Meeting of Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be held Saturday, January 25, 2020 from 1:00-3:00 p.m. at the Olympia Lodge of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 1, 405 Columbia Street SW, in downtown Olympia. There will be a program celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which empowered women to vote nationally. The program, open to the public, is entitled “Olympia’s Role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement.” We will also be recognizing three local organizations on 100 or more years of serving the Olympia community. They are the Olympia Lodge of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 1, The United Churches of Olympia, and Ira L. Cater Post No. 18, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Finally, we will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Bigelow House designation on the National Register of Historic Places with refreshments. The program will be followed by the annual business meeting. Lots of anniversaries to celebrate–please join us!

________________________________________________________________________

· January 1 & 2, 4:00 PM + 7:00 PM. Olympia Film Society (Olympia): Fantastic Fungi.

Paul Stamets is an author, mycologist (i.e., FUNGUS EXPERT), medical researcher and entrepreneur living in Shelton, working to deepen the understanding and respect for the organisms that literally exist under every footstep we take. His central premise is that habitats have immune systems, just like people, and that mushrooms are cellular bridges between the two. Paul’s philosophy is that “MycoDiversity is BioSecurity.” He sees the fungal genome of the ancient Old Growth forests of the Pacific Northwest as a resource of incalculable value on many levels. His passion is to preserve and protect as many ancestral strains of mushrooms as possible from these pristine woodlands. Visit the Olympia Film Society’s presentation of Fantastic Fungi at the Capital Theater for a unique discussion of these organisms to which most give little thought, beyond which pizza toppings to consider. This Olympia Film Society event takes place at the Historic Capitol Theater, 206 5th Avenue SE, Olympia.

· January 7, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Harbor History Museum (Gig Harbor): Gig Harbor Literary Society – The Sea Runners.

Acclaimed author Ivan Doig wrote ten books, including 3 non fiction works, perhaps highlighted by his memoir The House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind, about the Author’s upbringing in Montana. Visit the Harbor History Museum for an evening discussion of Doig’s work The Sea Runners, which tells the story of four indentured servants of Scandinavian descent who flee bondage in Russia-controlled Alaska in 1853. Quoting the publisher, “The four sea runners must weather the worst the ill-named Pacific can throw at them, and must weather their own fierce squalls, too, as day upon day, guided as much by instinct and determination as by map, they paddle through the magnificent maze of the Northwest Coast toward the mouth of the Columbia River.” This event is FREE and open to the public. Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. You are welcome to bring your own wine! Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, contact operations@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722. The Harbor History Museum is located at 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor.

· January 7, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): McMenamins Elks Temple History Pub – Whiskey, Mixologists, and the Pacific Northwest.

Northwest native Renee Cebula is passionate about history. A former history educator, her research focus turned to Cocktail Culture in America during the World Wars. The deeper she delved into this topic, the more her intellectual curiosities expanded to include America’s long and convoluted drinking history, the development of specialized tools and equipment, and the stories of mid-century decorative artists as they relate to drinking. Relax at McMenamins Elks Temple and hear fascinating tales of cocktail history from this local expert on the sometimes taboo subject! Food and drink available for purchase in McMenamins Elks Club’s beautiful Spanish Ballroom. This event is a partnership between the Washington State Historical Society and McMenamins Elks Temple, 565 Broadway, Tacoma. Doors open at 5:30 PM.

· January 8, 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM. Thurston County Chamber (Olympia): Chamber Forum – State of the Communities.

At the Chamber’s January meeting, Olympia Mayor Cheryl Selby, Lacey Mayor Andy Ryder, Tumwater Mayor Pete Kmet, Yelm Mayor JW Foster, and Thurston County Commissioner John Hutchings will collectively present a State of the Community address at the Forum. Representatives will share the state of their jurisdiction, and then will address moderated topics, including, but not limited to housing issues and job growth. For information, visit chambermaster.com/events/ This forum is taking place at Hotel RL Olympia 2300 Evergreen Park Dr SW Olympia. Cost is $35 general admission, $25 for online prepaid Chamber members and $30 for members at the door.

· January 9, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): Edward Jay Allen in Early Olympia.

Edward Jay Allen came to Puget Sound in December of 1852, via the Oregon Trail. After arriving following a very harrowing journey, he built a small cabin on Budd Inlet north of Olympia on land he received through his Donation Land Claim. A major aspect of Allen which set him apart from most white settlers was that he actually paid native peoples for the land before taking up residence. Edward kept a diary of his activities which, combined with letters sent back to family in the East all along his journey, became the basis for two fascinating books about Edwards, written by Schmidt House archives Curator Karen Johnson and historian & author Dennis Larsen. Visit Schmidt House for a fascinating talk by the authors on this unique Pacific Northwest settler. Signed copies of their books will be available for purchase during the event. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit www.olytumfoundation.org The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· January 9, 6:00 PM. The Port of Olympia (Olympia): Waterfront Project Open House.

The Port of Olympia, Frank Family and Squaxin Island Tribal Council are proposing a joint project along the East Bay trail and park at NorthPoint. Attend this meeting to learn about the proposed conceptual design and timeline. This event is free and open to the public, and is taking place at the Lacey Conference Center, 975 Carpenter Rd in Lacey.

· January 10, 10:15 AM. Senior Services for South Sound (Olympia): A Conversation on Civil Rights.

Senior Services for South Sound invite the community to an engaging conversation with Dr. Sherman Beverly, Gary Gerst, and Sara Theissen about Civil Rights today and yesterday. The civil rights movement, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and many other men and women, brought significant change to our nation, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Despite these laws, discrimination and unequal treatment of people not in the majority persists. The civil rights movement continues today in a modern version, exemplified by Black

Lives Matter. For information, contact Sara Thiessen by dialing 360-586-6181 or sars@southsoundseniors.org This event is free and open to the public, and is taking place at the Olympia Senior Center, 222 Columbia St NW in Olympia.

Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 1/1/20

Rotunda castle – 12/29/19

Carpenter Bill Soller put his talents into action to create this Disneyesque castle for the holiday display at the Legislative Building Rotunda in 1963. Soller is shown at the entrance to the castle, putting on finishing touches. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. Daily Olympian photo, December 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Rotunda castle – 12/29/19

Washington Junior High Glee Club – 12/2/19

The Daily Olympian captured youngsters from Washington Junior High School in December 1963 as they practiced for an upcoming Christmas concert. Pictured here are Freddy Dobler, Tom Cooper, and Doug Parris, members of the school’s glee club. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, December 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Washington Junior High Glee Club – 12/2/19

Frost girls – 11/24/19

Meet the four daughters of Olympia merchant Robert Frost: Carrie, Annie, Nellie and Florence (Floy). The Frost home was on the east side of Olympia, near East Bay Drive. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

1885 photo by Rogers Studio, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Frost girls – 11/24/19

Union Pacific Depot – 11/17/19

The Union Pacific depot on Fourth Avenue is shown here in a photo from the 1920s. The depot was later the site of a tragic 1959 accident involving runaway freight cars. A portion of the depot building still exists, now the site of a pet store. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Boland photo, 1920s, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Union Pacific Depot – 11/17/19

All-Woman Jury Trial in Olympia

Note: Links in this article are to Residents and/or Where Are We? entries on our website for the individuals and organizations named.

The issue of jury service for women was integral to the history of woman suffrage.  When Washington Women gained the right to vote during the Territorial period from 1883-1888, the issue of their jury services was at the heart of at least three judicial challenges, two of which resulted in women losing the right to vote.  After male voters ratified a constitutional amendment empowering women to vote on November 8, 1910, they again became legal jurors.

            This status was tested just a month after the election on December 13, 1910 in Olympia in the Justice Court of Milton Giles, who empaneled an all woman jury in the case of Koch v. Fouls & Canfield.  The case involved A. Koch who was a milkman against Fouls & Canfield who were contractors working on Olympia streets.  Koch claimed that a blast by the contractors working on Central Street caused his team of horses driven by Frank Fuchs to run away causing damage of $10.05.

Superior Court juries had to wait for women jurors since at the time the list for those jurors was drawn up from poll books and registrants on the first Monday in July and women had only gained the vote in November 1910.  In justice courts there was no set list and when the jury trial was demanded, as in this case, the judge made a list of 18 with the same qualifications as those in superior courts and attorneys each had the option of striking off six names on the list leaving six to try the case. (“Six Olympia Women Drawn for Jury,” Morning Olympian, December 10, 1910 pg 1 and 3.) 

All of the 18 jurors initially called were women—those struck off the list also included well-known suffragists.  Those originally called were Mrs. Mitchel Harris [nee Toba Lichtenstein], Mrs. George Taylor, Mrs. George Zern, Mrs. Charles Peters, Mrs. George (Georgiana) Blankenship, Mrs. Victor (Lena) Meyer, Mrs. T. D. (Kate) Young, Mrs. Charles (Carlotta) Van Eaton, Mrs. T. McLeay [Macleay?], Mrs. J. M. (Ida)  Hitt, Mrs. E. L. (Edith) Sylvester [nee Hall], and Mrs. Wm. (Laura)Nunn.  Although six women were called, one of them Mrs. Pauline Graves, was excused by a doctor’s note.  The remaining women on the jury were Ada Sprague Mowell, Sadie Bower Blakeslee, Rev. Genevra Lake, Bernice Sapp and Jean McLeod.

One of the issues which the county clerk wrestled with was the 1909 law which required that jurors must have lived in the county at least one year, be a qualified juror and a tax payer.  In the December case, then Clerk-elect D. G. Parker interpreted it that if a woman’s husband was a taxpayer—she was as well.  He must also have determined single working women were also taxpayers.  (“Clerk Is In Quandry Now,” Morning Olympian December 10, 1910 pg. 1) 

J.W. Wilson, the attorney for Canfield argued it was not because the jurors were women that he opposed their service but believed more legislative action was needed.  He wanted to examine the jurors for their qualifications but plaintiff’s attorney objected which was sustained by Judge Giles.

The women who were seated were well known in the community and some had been active in the suffrage movement—causing some newspapers to dub it an “All Suffragist Jury.”

courtesy

Chosen as foreman was Ada Sprague Mowell.  Mowell was a teacher who started her career at the age of 15, and was, at one time, principal of Lincoln school.  She later married Dr. John Mowell and became very active in the Woman’s Club of Olympia as well as serving in several other organizations.  During World War I she headed the women’s home front group in Thurston County known as the “Minute Women.” She died in 1953. Photograph courtesy Washington State Historical Society, WSHS C1950.1117.1.23.4

 Bernice Sapp had been a leading suffragist and at the time of the trial was a stenographer for the Washington State Supreme Court.  She had headed the efforts for the “Poll List Canvas” project during the 1910 suffrage amendment ratification effort and was a prominent member of the Olympia Suffrage Club, an officer in the Washington Equal Suffrage Association, and participated in the “Poster Brigade” during the campaign.   This was an effort to place posters advocating for suffrage prominently in towns and cities across the state.   Later in her life she became a leading historian of Thurston County and for many years was a clerk for the Supreme Court Reporter.  She died in 1965. Photograph courtesy Washington State Historical Society, WSHS C1961.18.29

 

Jean McLeod (shown here with other staffers at the Legislature, including Bernice Sapp) at the time of her jury service was a stenographer in Governor Hay’s Office and was an officer in the Business Woman’s Equal Suffrage Booster Club.  McLeod had also served in the Governor’s office for Governors Albert Mead and Samuel Cosgrove as well as secretary to State Land Commissioner Clark V. Savage.  Besides her secretarial skills she was also an author and wrote under the nom de plume “Jean Joggles.” She later married Earl Holloway and continued her work for the state with the State Division of Banking for 29 years.  She died in 1966. Photograph courtesy Washington State Historical Society, C2013.18.39

 

Sadie Bower Blakeslee was the wife of local businessman Frank G. Blakeslee and a member of the Woman’s Club of Olympia and active socially.  She died in 1946.

Reverend Genevra (Mrs. H. S.) Lake was originally from New York and become well-known as a spiritualist, poet and lecturer.  She became the official pastor of the Boston First Spiritualist Temple in the 1880s. 

By 1898, Lake had become a vegetarian and advertised that she was establishing a vegetarian commune in Olympia, Washington and started an independent church there. 

She was associated with the Populist and Socialist movements.  Lake was a national advocate for suffrage and continued her suffrage advocacy in Washington.  She also used her rhetorical skills for the cause leading up to the ratification vote in 1910 in a debate in Olympia on the women’s suffrage.  She died in Olympia in 1921. Photograph courtesy First Spiritual Temple. 

The women were sworn in by then County Clerk William Nunn and a contemporary newspaper article reported that “at one time or another” during the proceedings every attorney in town was present at the trial which made nation-wide headlines.

J.W. Wilson, later a Superior Court Judge in Thurston County, was the attorney for Canfield and objected to women on the jury saying he did not believe the jury was legal and wanted to examine them.

The attorneys for the plaintiff were Gordon Mackay, H. L. Parr and Fred M. Whitman who demanded a jury trial.  They were also joined by E. C. Collier.  To Parr, the Morning Olympian of December 14, 1910, said, “fell the honor of making the first argument to be made to a woman jury to be drawn in the state since women were permitted to vote.”

 Wilson claimed the drawing of women to be illegal and refused to strike so the judge acted for him in striking off the six names. Wilson said he would ask the superior court for a writ of certiori as soon as the judgment was entered in the case, since he believed women were not qualified. 

The question was whether or not women by gaining the vote qualified as jurors or whether further legislative action was needed where voting laws stated that “men” were jurors.

Newspapers said that Justice Giles, “backed by several of the most prominent attorneys in the city” believed women were qualified.   

The Tacoma Daily Ledger December 14, 1910 said the women gave excuses not to serve and said they made their decision “without removing their hats.”  The article said that the court was crowded with onlookers who frequented laughed at the proceedings.

The article also said that, “According to attorneys here, this is the first time in Washington, if not the United States, that a female jury drawn from a venire of women only, has been selected to try a case.  Judge Giles of the justice court who presides declares that the jury of women is far superior in every way to any jury that every sat in his court.”

The trial lasted for about eight hours, but after deliberating an hour, the women returned a verdict in favor of Koch for $10.05 in damages.  The jury received wide-spread media attention at the time and it was part of the changes brought about by the enactment of women’s right to vote in Washington in 1910.

The 1911 Washington State Legislature specified that all electors, including women, would be eligible jurors—finally settling the issue that precipitated the court cases overturning women’s suffrage in the 1880s. Washington became the first state in the union to legislate authorization for women to serve as jurors. The statute did allow a sex-based exemption, however, since women could opt out of jury duty without cause. This exemption was removed by state law in 1967, and the current law (RCW 2.36.080) outlines state policy on selection of jurors and exclusion on account of membership in a protected class or economic status.

Sources:

“All Suffragist Jury Drawn in Justice Giles Court—First in State,” Olympia Daily Recorder, December 9, 1910, pg. 1

“’Best Jury Ever” Says Justice Giles of First Woman Jury,” Olympia Daily Recorder, December 14, 1910, pg. 1

“Biographical Sketch of Sara Genevra Chafa Lake,” in Militant Suffragists Database accessed at: https://documents.alexanderstreet.com/d/1010113896

“Biographical Sketch of Bernice Althea Sapp,” in Militant Suffragists Database accessed at: https://documents.alexanderstreet.com/d/1010113904\

Caplan, Aaron, “The History of Women’s Jury Service in Washington,” Washington State Bar News, March 2005, 12-21.)

Clerk is in Quandry Now,” Morning Olympian, December 12, 1910, pg. 1.

Crooks, Jennifer, “Doing Her Share:  Ada Sprague Mowell, Community Activist in the Early Twentieth Century,” accessed at: https://www.thurstontalk.com/2014/09/25/share-ada-sprague-mowell-community-activist-early-twentieth-century/

“Crowds See All-Woman Jury Sworn,” Olympia Daily Recorder, December 13, 1910, pg. 1.

“Estate Settled Up of Quaint Character Former Suffrage Worker,” [Rev. Genevra Lake], Olympia Daily Recorder, December 23, 1921, pg. 8.

“Five Women Sit on Olympia Jury,” Tacoma Daily Ledger, December 14, 1910, pg. 14.

“Jean Joggles” is Wed at Tacoma,”  Bellingham Herald, December 31, 1914, pg. 4.

“Millinery Displays Bob Into Jury Box,” Seattle Daily Times, December 14, 1910, pg. 17.

Obituary for Ada Sprague Mowell, Daily Olympian, January 7, 1953, pg.14.

Obituary for Bernice A. Sapp, Daily Olympian, October 25, 1965, pg. 3.

Obituary for Harry L. Parr, Daily Olympian, April 25, 1962, pg. 1

Obituary for Jean McLeod Holloway, Daily Olympian, January 30, 1966, pg. 11.

Obituary for Judge Milton Giles, Morning Olympian, March 16, 1919, pg. 1.

Obituary for Sarah (Sadie) Bower Blakeslee, Daily Olympian, June 17, 1946, pg.6.

“Proud of Jury Duty,” Tacoma Daily Ledger, January 8, 1911, pg. 20.

“Six Women Drawn for Jury Duty,” Morning Olympian, December 10, 1910, p.1-3.

Stevenson, Shanna, Women’s Votes, Women’s Voices:  The Campaign for Equal Rights in Washington, Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma: 2009.

See also: Unpublished Chronology of Rev. Genevra (Mrs. H. S. Lake)  Prepared by Dr. Albert Von Frank

“Woman Jury Has Awful Time,” Morning Olympian, December 14, 1910, pg. 1

“Women Seek to Get Off Jury,” Olympia Daily Recorder, December 12, 1910, pg. 1.

 

Posted in Women's History | Comments Off on All-Woman Jury Trial in Olympia

First All-Woman Jury in Washington State

After most women in Washington permanently achieved the right to vote on November 8, 1910 with the ratification of an amendment to the Washington State Constitution, the first all-women jury in the state was impaneled on December 13, 1910 in Olympia.  Link here for more information about the jurors and the trial. 
 
A full size copy of the poster shown at left is on display in the Thurston County Courthouse Building  2. If you would like to download and print a high resolution image of the poster shown at left, please e-mail olyhistory@gmail.com.
 
This project was funded through a Votes for Women Centennial Grant provided by the Washington State Women’s Commission and the Washington State Historical Society and produced by the Thurston County Historic Courts Committee in partnership with Thurston County Superior Court and Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.
 
 
 
 
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on First All-Woman Jury in Washington State

History of Women’s Suffrage in Olympia

Excerpted in part from Women’s Votes, Women’s Voices: The Campaign for Equal Rights in Washington by Shanna Stevenson, published by the Washington State Historical Society 2009.  Copyright Washington State Historical Society—Used by permission, all rights reserved. 

As the territorial and state capital of Washington, Olympia was central to women’s suffrage history of Washington. 

During the Territorial era, the legislature could define who could vote.  In 1854, just six years after the Declaration of Sentiments was signed at the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848, Seattle legislator Arthur A. Denny proposed women’s suffrage in the first meeting of the Washington Territorial Legislature in Olympia. Denny proposed to amend a pending bill relating to voting “to allow all white females over the age of 18 years to vote,” but it failed in the house of representatives by a vote of 8–9.[1]

The 1867 territorial voting law clearly stated that “all white American citizens twenty-one years of age” had the right to vote.[2]  This territorial law empowering “all white American citizens” to vote became the rallying point for Washington suffragists who also cited the 1868 Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution as defining citizens as “all persons born or naturalized in the United States.” In 1869 suffragist Mary Olney Brown tested the 1867 law in White River, but was turned away from the polls. 

Undaunted, Brown launched her own suffrage campaign the following year, writing several newspaper editorials urging women to vote.[3] By 1870 she had moved to Olympia, and her sister  Charlotte Emily Olney French was living in Grand Mound, in southern Thurston County. With other women in the area, the sisters planned a picnic dinner near Grand Mound at the schoolhouse at Goodell’s Point, where the June 6, 1870, election was to be held. French, like her sister, was well-versed in the arguments for women’s suffrage and spoke at the gathering. After the picnic, the women—seven in all—handed in their ballots. The husband of one of the women was an election inspector for that precinct; this may have had something to do with their ballots being accepted. Women of nearby Black River (present-day Littlerock) had stationed a man on a “fleet horse” at the Grand Mound precinct to report whether the women there had been allowed to vote. The man arrived at the polling place waving his hat and yelling, “They’re voting! They’re voting!” Eight Black River women immediately cast their ballots.

While the southern Thurston County women were successful in having their votes counted, a small Olympia delegation was not. When Brown and two women presented ballots at the Olympia courthouse, they were rejected despite Brown’s legal arguments and threats of prosecution against the election officials.[4] Although those fifteen votes did not constitute a permanent stride toward suffrage in Washington, they provided a significant stepping-stone in the overall history of the movement.

In autumn 1871 women’s rights leaders Susan B. Anthony and Abigail Scott Duniway toured the Northwest, accelerating the women’s suffrage movement in Washington Territory.  The women endured a difficult stage trip from Monticello on the Cowlitz River (near present-day Longview) to Olympia, the territorial capital, where Anthony spoke on October 17 to an audience of about one hundred, including some legislators.

Two days later Anthony and Duniway addressed the legislature in session.   The day before her legislative speech, Anthony dined at the home of fellow suffragists, Daniel and Ann Elizabeth Bigelow in Olympia, now the Bigelow House Museum at 918 Glass Avenue NE.

On October 19, Anthony spoke before the legislature. The Olympia Transcript said of her speech: “Miss Anthony is a woman of more than ordinary ability, and the able manner in which she handled her subject before the Legislature, was ample warning to the members of that body who oppose woman suffrage to be silent.”[5] Duniway also spoke to the legislature. The house of representatives turned down a proposal to print Anthony’s legislative address, but the Washington Standard published a summary of it.[6]

After a swing around Puget Sound, Anthony returned to Olympia to participate in Washington’s first women’s suffrage convention, which began on November 8, 1871. A committee including Sarah Yesler, Daniel Bigelow, and Anthony drafted the constitution for the Washington Territory Woman Suffrage Association (WTWSA), the principle outcome of the convention.[7] The WTWSA spurred the creation of local suffrage organizations in Olympia and Thurston County.

Throughout the 1870s the WTWSA continued its work and the territorial legislature considered various suffrage measures.  In 1873 Territorial Legislator Edward Eldridge introduced a women’s suffrage bill, which lost 12–18 in the house of representatives. In 1875 Olympia legislator Elwood Evans, then speaker of the house, introduced another suffrage bill, which was again defeated—this time 11–15. An effort to repeal a definitive law of 1871 that precluded women’s suffrage until Congress took action also failed.[8]

In 1881 the issue of women’s suffrage was again before the legislature, brought to the forefront with a petition signed by fifty women.[9] Although the bill carried the house 13–11, it lost in council 5–7.[10] (Once Washington achieved statehood in 1889, the council became the state senate.)  Saloon owners, and other anti-prohibitionists thwarted the council effort for suffrage legislation.

Building on gains for women during the previous decade, the suffrage movement gathered momentum in Washington after 1881. In 1883, the Territorial Legislature passed women’s suffrage.[11] Only Wyoming and Utah territories had enacted woman’s suffrage after the Civil War before Washington. Washington’s victory was different from those two territories because women in Wyoming and Utah had not solicited the right to vote, while Washington’s women petitioned and campaigned for the ballot.[12]

After the success of the suffrage bill, celebrations erupted around the state, but Olympia was the site of special jubilance. Duniway described the festivities in her newspaper the New Northwest:

It is 4 o’clock p.m. on Monday, November 19, 1883. As we write, church bells are ringing and a grand salute of minute guns sends out its joyful reverberations through the air proclaiming that Governor William A. Newell has formally announced that he will sign the Woman Suffrage bill and thereby make the women of Washington Territory free beyond peradventure…. All the people of Olympia…are rallying around the standard-bearers of liberty and justice, lifting their hearts and voices in unison with theirs to swell the glad anthem of rejoicing that ascend to heaven through the mingling hallelujahs of the guns and bells. [13]

In her account of the victory, Duniway recognized the many women of Olympia who supported the cause of suffrage, including sisters Emily Olney French and Mary Olney Brown,  and Clara Sylvester, Ella Stork, and Janet Moore. It is no coincidence that many of these same women had been charter members of the first women’s club on the West Coast, the Woman’s Club of Olympia, which began meeting in 1883 at Clara Sylvester’s home. By one account, the club’s purpose was to promote suffrage principles.[14]  

Women’s right to vote aroused strong opponents. Made legal householders by the legislature in 1881 and voters under the 1883 suffrage law, women became qualified jurors.  This spurred legal challenges which came before the Territorial Supreme Court.

In 1887, the Territorial Supreme Court focused on the legality of women’s suffrage. The court decided that the title of the 1883 law did not describe the content of the legislative act, making it invalid along with the provisions of a1886 amendment. The justices ruled that because the 1883 act was invalid, women were not qualified electors and thus not legal jurors.

After the judicial decision overturning women’s right to vote, suffragists descended on the legislature once again, and on January 18, 1888, legislators reenacted a women’s suffrage law with the appropriate title. However, this version of the law excluded women from jury service.

The suffrage victory was short-lived. Another case came before the court in 1888 and the court decided that when the Washington Territorial Organic Act passed Congress, “the word ‘citizen’ was used as a qualification for voting and holding office and, in our judgment, the word then meant and still signifies male citizenship and must be so construed.”[15]  

 Only male voters selected the members of Washington’s second Constitutional Convention, (the first was an unsuccessful try at statehood in 1878) which began in Olympia on July 4, 1889, and the suffrage cause was weakened correspondingly, although suffragists “flooded” the convention with petitions.[16]

Despite these efforts, the constitutional convention delegates decided that women’s suffrage would be a separate issue on the statewide ballot, along with adoption of the proposed constitution itself and separate tallies on the location of the capital and enactment of prohibition. While the state constitution was ratified on October 1, 1889, by a territory-wide vote, the separate suffrage proposal lost by 19,000 votes, 16,521–35,913. Prohibition also failed, 19,546–31,487.

Washington joined the union on November 11, 1889. The next year, the state legislature authorized women to vote for local school trustees and directors but not for county or state school superintendents.

While the (male) voters of the state did not believe that women should have the franchise except in school elections, women alone voted for the state flower. The issue arose when Washington was invited to participate in the 1893 Chicago Columbian Exposition and part of each state’s exposition display was to be a flower representing the state. Washington did not have an official flower, and the Washington State Fair Committee left the matter to its female members.

Polling places for women voting in the flower election included post offices and even a drugstore in downtown Olympia, which encouraged women to choose their preference of the state flower. Balloting closed August 1, 1892, and the rhododendron won over clover 7,704–5,720 out of 14,419 votes cast. The Washington State Senate confirmed the rhododendron on February 10, 1893.[17] In 1959 the legislature further defined the state flower as Rhododendron macrophyllum, native to western North America, which continues to represent Washington today.

The Fusion Party (Silver Republicans, Democrats, and Populists) gained legislative seats in 1896, providing a positive political climate for women’s suffrage in the legislature which passed a suffrage constitutional amendment in 1897.  The amendment ratification lost on November 8, 1898, by a vote of 30,540–20,658, which was a gain of 9,510 pro-suffrage votes over the 1889 tally. From 1906 to 1908 suffrage leaders focused on organization, and from 1908 forward their emphasis was on campaigning.

At the Washington Equal Suffrage Association State Convention in 1908 the executive committee authorized DeVoe to take charge of the effort to introduce women’s suffrage legislation in the 1909 legislature that would amend the Washington constitution.[18]

 By 1909, the political climate favored the suffragists’ efforts in the legislature.  For its Olympia headquarters WESA rented a large house near the capitol. Suffragists, using persistent but low-key lobbying, are generally credited with the passage of the suffrage-enabling legislation in the house of representatives on January 29, 1909.

The legislative journey through the senate proved much more arduous. The senate eventually voted for the legislation on February 23, 1909, by a margin of 30–9, Acting Governor Marion Hay[19] signed the bill on February 25, 1909, authorizing a statewide vote for ratification of the amendment in November 1910. At that time, statewide elections were held only in even-numbered years.  

In addition to general support, Olympia and Thurston County suffragists Lena Meyer, Clara Lord, and Libbie Lord spearheaded the effort to secure a straw ballot at the State Grange Convention in 1910.  Members of the state Grange voted in favor of women’s right to vote in their September straw poll—foreshadowing victory in November 1910.

Leaders Emma Smith DeVoe, May Arkwright Hutton, and other Washington suffragists generally conducted a “womanly” campaign.  The Washington Women’s Cook Book was one of the campaign’s primary fundraising projects.  They also published a newspaper, put up posters and used grass roots organizing.

The vote result on November 8, 1910 was 52,299–29,676 in favor of ratification of the women’s suffrage amendment—a margin of nearly two to one.[20]   Washington joined the four western states where women had already won the vote—Wyoming (1890), Colorado (1893), Utah (1896), and Idaho (1896). Governor Hay officially signed the proclamation of adoption on November 28, 1910. Twenty-two years had passed since the Territorial Supreme Court had last taken away Washington women’s right to vote.[21]

The stunningly decisive victory in 1910 is widely credited with reinvigorating the national movement. When Washington joined her western sisters in 1910, it had been fourteen years since a state had enacted irrevocable women’s suffrage.

Women started voting in the same proportion as men.  The period between 1911 and 1920 was a period of significant legislative changes regarding women’s issues abetted by coalitions forged during the suffrage movement among women’s clubs and working-class women. Mothers’ pensions, the eight-hour workday for women, and Prohibition were part of the Progressive agenda adopted after women attained the ballot.

In June 1919, after intense pressure from both the National Women’s Party and the National American Woman Suffrage Association, Congress passed the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and sent it to the states for ratification. Washington was the penultimate of thirty-six states needed to ratify the amendment and the last enfranchised state to take action. Leaders Emma Smith DeVoe and Carrie Chapman Catt pressured a reluctant Governor Louis Hart to call a special legislative session. Hart eventually agreed to call the legislators together in March 1920. PPierce County representative Frances Haskell, the fourth woman elected to the Washington legislature, introduced the resolution, stating:

This is a very important hour in the history of our state and nation, for we have met here in special session the 22nd day of March, in the year of our Lord 1920, to ratify the federal suffrage amendment and to prove to the world the greatness of our Evergreen state, which is not determined by the number of acres that it contains nor by the number of its population, but by the character of its men and women who today are extending to all the women of America the privilege of the ballot.[22]

Governor Hart, Speaker Fred Adams, and Emma Smith DeVoe shared the dais in the house of representatives, and by special resolution, DeVoe expressed her thanks to the legislature. In the senate, veteran suffragist Carrie Hill shared the podium with President of the Senate Philip H. Carlyon of Olympia. Both houses cast a unanimous vote to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment—the twelfth state in which no one voted against the amendment.[23]  Tennessee was the final state needed to ratify the amendment which codified that “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” The amendment became official on August 26, 1920.[24] 

Not all women in the United States could vote after passage of Washington’s suffrage act or the Nineteenth Amendment, since many groups were restricted from becoming U.S. citizens, a qualification for voting. Native American women, who were excluded from voting in even after passage of the suffrage amendments in 1910 and 1920, finally achieved the right to vote in 1924 when Congress passed the Indian Citizenship Act, which extended U.S. citizenship to Native Americans. Asian women faced other citizenship restrictions. By national law, native-born Asian residents were considered citizens by 1898. Immigrant Asians, however, were denied citizenship well into the mid-twentieth century. By 1943 Chinese immigrants could be naturalized and vote; immigrants from India received the same rights starting in 1946; and Japanese and other Asians in 1952.[25]

Some voters faced racist barriers. Although black women achieved the right to vote in 1910 in Washington and in 1920 nationally, barriers remained. Most significant was passage in 1965 of the Voting Rights Act, which ended practices that disenfranchised black voters and broadened and guaranteed voting rights specifically to minorities. The Twenty-sixth Amendment lowered the voting age to eighteen in 1971. In later years, the Legislature has enacted other measures to ensure voter equality including the Washington Voting Rights Act in 2018.

After the state enacted women’s suffrage in 1910, Washington women began to run for office in ever-increasing numbers. Elected in 1912 and serving in the 1913 state house of representatives, Frances C. Axtell from Bellingham and Nena J. Croake from Tacoma were the first two women to serve in the Washington State Legislature. Reba Hurn from Spokane was in 1923 the first woman elected to the state senate.  Josephine Corliss Preston, elected in 1912 as superintendent of public instruction, was the first woman to serve in a statewide office.   Washington has consistently been a leader in electing women to the state legislature. From 1993 to 2004 Washington led the nation in the percentage of female state legislators. In 1999 and 2000 Washington boasted the highest percentage of female legislators in the nation’s history, with women making up 41 percent of its legislators. In 2021, women comprised approximately 41.5 percent of the state’s legislators, the ninth highest in the country. [26]

Washington women have served on the Washington Supreme Court and as superintendent of public instruction, secretary of state, attorney general, commissioner of public lands, and insurance commissioner. Washington women have also held elected positions on local school boards, local courts, special purpose districts, city councils, county commissions and councils, and as county executives throughout the state’s history.

Olympia has had three women mayors—Amanda Benek Smith, Holly Gadbaw and Cheryl Selby. As of 2021, 5 of the 7 City Council members are women.[27]

[1] Washington Territory, House Journal, 1854, 98.

[2] Laws of Washington Territory, Olympia, Public Printer T. F McElroy, 1867, 5.

[3] Ibid.

[4] “Mrs. Brown’s Argument,” Elizabeth Cady Santon, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Josleyn Gage, and Ida Husted Harper, ed. History of Woman Suffrage, 6 vols. (Rochester: J. J. Little & Co., 1881-1922) Hereafter cited HWS, 3:784-85.

[5] “Miss Anthony’s Speech,” Olympia Transcript, October 21, 1871.

[6] “Woman Suffrage,” Washington Standard, October 21, 1871.

[7] “Woman Suffrage Convention,” Washington Standard, November 11, 1871, 2; and Simmons, “History of Woman Suffrage in the State of Washington,” 22. Anti-suffragists were James H. Lasater of Walla Walla and Mrs. J. B. Frost, and pro-suffragists were Father (likely A. A.) Denny, Alfred Elder, John Denny, and Abigail Scott Duniway.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Clyde  B. Simmons, “History of Woman Suffrage in the State of Washington,” (master’s thesis, University of Washington, 1903) 24.

[10] William H. White (aka “Warhorse Bill”) was a prominent Washington jurist. He served in several capacities, including prosecuting attorney, legislator from King County, U.S. attorney, and Washington State Supreme Court justice. In 1912 he helped his wife, Emma McRedmond White, in her bid for King County clerk. She also organized the Woman’s Democratic Club in King County. “Justice William Henry White,” http://www.redmondwashington.org/biography/white/white-william-henry.htm.

[11] The bill was introduced in the Washington House by Representative Copley, and was supported in speeches by Messrs. Copley, Besserer, Miles, Clark, and Stitzel, while Messrs. Landrum and Kincaid spoke against it. The vote was: Ayes—Besserer, Brooks, Clark, Copley, Foster, Goodell, Hungate, Kuhn, Lloyd, Martin Miles, Shaw, Stitzel and Speaker Ferguson-14. Noes—Barlow, Brining, Landrum, Pin, Kincaid, Shoudy and Young—7. Absent—Blackwell, Turpin, and Warner—3. The bill was favorably reported in the Council, November 15, by Chairman Burk of the Judiciary Committee. No one offered to speak on it. The vote stood: Ayes—Burk, Edmiston, Hale, Harper, Kerr, Power and Smith—7. Noes—Caton, Collins, Houghton, Whitehouse and President Ruax—5. Governor W. A. Newell Approved the bill November 23, 1883.

[12] T. Alfred Larson, “The Woman Suffrage Movement in Washington,” Pacific Northwest Quarterly 67, no. 2 (April1976) 53.

[13] Abigail Scott Duniway, “The Ratification,” New Northwest, November 22, 1883.

[14] Rebecca Mead, How the Vote Was Won, (New York: New York University Press, 2004) 99.

[15] Bloomer v. Todd, 3 Wash. Terr. 599 (1888).

[16] Beverly Paulik Rosenow, ed., The Journal of the Washington State Constitutional Convention (1889; reprint, Seattle: Book Publishing Company, 1962), 642-43. Petitioners: P.G. Hendricks, 394 other men and 414 women; William West and others; Francis Miner of St. Louis; A. M. Sweeney, Jennie Aukney and others of Walla Walla; H. J. Beeks and others; Mr. Giliam and others; Marty T. Jones and others; G. C. Barron and others; W. V. Anders and others; Lucinda King and others; L. W. Studgall and others; W. P. Stewart and others; P. J. Flint and others; Zerelda. McCoy and 26 teachers; Dr. A. K. Bush and 94 others; S.M. Ballard and 151 others; George E. Cline and 163 others; L. M. Lord and 82 others; C. F. Woodcock and 120 others; ninety-three voters of Buckley; and Zerelda McCoy, a taxpaying woman.

[17] Lucile McDonald, “The Battle over the State Flower,” Seattle Times Magazine, January 31, 1965, 2; Ruth Fry Epperson, “Rhododendron, Our State Flower: Talk Given by Mrs. Ruth Fry Epperson at the May Breakfast, 1944 of the Women’s Century Club, Seattle, Wash,” unpublished manuscript, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle, Washington (MOHAI) Accession No. 1964.3359.

[18] C. H. Baily, “How Washington Women Regained the Ballot,” Pacific Monthly 26 (July 1911): 1-11, 8. See also ”Women Play Game of Politics,” Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 4, 1908.

[19] Governor Samuel Cosgrove was ill and Lieutenant Governor Hay was Acting Governor at this time. Governor Cosgrove died on March 28, 1909.

[20] Only 59.3 percent of those casting ballots in the general election voted on the suffrage issue. The reason for this anomaly is unknown, but the ballot wording may have confused some voters.

[21] “Women Are to Give Special Thanks.” November 13, 1910, DeVoe Scrapbooks, DeVoe Papers.

[22] “Suffrage Amendment Ratified Unanimously,” Washington Standard, March 23, 1920, 1.

[23] Dr. Cora Smith Eaton King et al., “Washington,” HWS, 6:685-86.

[24] Nineteenth Amendment. http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/amendment_19/print_friendly.html?page=index_content.html&title=The_19th_Amendment

[25] Jill Severn, The State We’re In: Washington, Your guide to state, tribal and local government, (Seattle: The League of Women Voters Education Fund, 2004), 36.

[26] 61 woman legislators for 41.5%;  19 in the Senate, 39%; 42 in the House, 43%. The 61 is a historic high, matching the total in 1996. The 42 in the House is the highest yet, beating the previous House high of 41 in 2019.https://leg.wa.gov/legislature/Pages/MemberInformation.aspx

[27] City of Olympia website:  http://olympiawa.gov/city-government/city-council-and-mayor.aspx

 

Posted in Women's History | Comments Off on History of Women’s Suffrage in Olympia

Minnie Mossman Hill – 11/10/19

A former resident of Olympia, Minnie Mossman Hill was the first licensed female steamship captain. She navigated some of the most treacherous waters on the Pacific Coast, the mouth of the Columbia River on the border between Oregon and Washington, on a variety of steamships, one of them named the Minnie Hill.  She was posthumously inducted into the National Rivers Hall of Fame in 2017. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

tintype by unknown photographer, around 1885, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Minnie Mossman Hill – 11/10/19

New Voting Machine – 11/3/19

League of Women Voters members Mrs. Jess Spielholz and Mrs. Frank Calkins receive instructions from Thurston County auditor Wes Leach on the workings of the new voting machine in Olympia, acquired in 1964 to tabulate votes without human intervention. The machine was temporarily installed in a grocery store, to give voters experience using it in advance of the upcoming elections. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on New Voting Machine – 11/3/19

Margaret McKenny autographs books for youngsters – 10/20/19

Renowned and beloved mycologist (mushroom expert) Margaret McKenny meets with young Freddy Dobler, Gary Bichsel and Greg Bichsel at Pat’s Bookery in downtown Olympia, to autograph her book The Savory Wild Mushroom. A local park, campground, and elementary school are all named after Miss McKenny, a lifelong resident of Olympia. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, October 1962, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Margaret McKenny autographs books for youngsters – 10/20/19

John Grace – 9/29/19

John Grace is a cherished member of Olympia’s music-loving community. Blind from early childhood, Grace has operated a piano tuning service for over five decades. He is shown here in this Daily Olympian article from 1964, early in his career. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on John Grace – 9/29/19

Loyal Women at Emma Page fountain – 9/22/19

Emma Page was a noted temperance advocate. A fountain at the corner of Sylvester Park commemorates her work to promote water as a healthy alternative to alcohol. A trough at the base of the fountain recognizes her love of animals. In this photograph from the early 20th century, a group of women from Olympia’s First Christian Church pose in front of the fountain. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Alfred Tice photo, around 1905, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Loyal Women at Emma Page fountain – 9/22/19

China Clipper – 9/15/19

The China Clipper, now the Clipper Cafe, is an iconic establishment in downtown Olympia. In this photograph from 1963, owner CY Wong is at work in the restaurant’s kitchen. The Clipper was one of the businesses destroyed in the Great Train Wreck of 1959 but was rebuilt within a year and continued to be a popular source of Chinese cuisine.   Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on China Clipper – 9/15/19

Washington State Teachers’ Association – 9/8/19

The Washington State Teachers Association, now the Washington Education Association, is one of the state’s oldest professional associations. In this photograph from April 1889, its charter members and their families pose at the Territorial Capitol to celebrate the association’s foundation. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Unknown photographer, 1889, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Washington State Teachers’ Association – 9/8/19

Lincoln Crossing Guards – 9/1/19

Lincoln Elementary School crossing guards sported new fluorescent vests for the start of the 1963 school year. Pictured here are fifth graders Charles Barron and Mary Thomson, assisting young Susie Baker, Bobby Hunter, and Wanda Ewell. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Lincoln Crossing Guards – 9/1/19

Pet Parade – 8/25/19

The annual Pet Parade, sponsored by the Olympian, is a long-standing late summer tradition. In this photo from 1964, four-year-old Jeff Hettler dresses as his favorite Beatle, John. His pet is not identified: perhaps a beetle? Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Pet Parade – 8/25/19

Waiting for Taft – 8/19/19

In 1909, President William Howard Taft took a tour of Washington State. This photo commemorates the day that residents of Lacey came out in force to cheer on the president as he passed by rail through the small community. The Lacey depot can be seen behind the crowd. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

unknown photographer, 1909, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Waiting for Taft – 8/19/19

Null Set – 8/11/19

The Null Set coffee house opened in West Olympia in August 1964, owned by Pat and Pete Holm and Bonnie and Bob Gillis. In addition to serving coffee and pastries, the coffee house featured folk music, served up with a dash of liberal-leaning politics. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Null Set – 8/11/19

Mary Olney Brown – 8/4/19

Mary Olney Brown, an early area settler, was a medical practitioner, poet, and ardent suffragist. In 1870 she attempted to vote in Thurston County but was turned away. Several other women, including Mary’s sister Emily Olney French, were more successful, voting in south Thurston County.  

  1. Wilson Clark photo, about 1883, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society
Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Mary Olney Brown – 8/4/19

Petroglyph – 7/28/19

A group of workers carefully places a large stone, called a petroglyph, at the Olympia Tumwater Foundation’s headquarters at Tumwater Falls Park. The stone, inscribed with multiple tribal symbols, had been transported from a beach on Harstine Island in 1963 and donated to the Washington State Historical Society. In 2008 it was returned to the Squaxin Tribe and is now at the Veterans Memorial at the Tribal Museum near Shelton. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Petroglyph – 7/28/19

Henry Harris – 7/21/19

A young Henry Harris looks distinctly unimpressed at being photographed in his smart kilted suit. The Harris family were prominent Olympia merchants and active in the Jewish community. Their store building still exists at 518 Capitol Way, and their home, formerly adjacent to Sylvester Park, is now at the corner of 7th and Adams. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Henry Harris – 7/21/19

Olympia Women’s Suffrage Trail

The Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum has created an Olympia Women’s Suffrage Trail to highlight the important contributions Olympia residents made toward the goal of votes for women. An interactive map of the trail is below as well as a link to a downloadable PDF describing the features of the trail, and additional information about the history of women’s suffrage in Olympia. 

A high-resolution image of the Olympia Women’s Suffrage History banner at left can be obtained by contacting us at olyhistory@gmail.com. Please indicate your intended use of the banner for our records. 

 

 

 

The program is funded with support provided by the Washington State Women’s Commission and the Washington State Historical Society through the Votes for Women Centennial Grant Program. 

 

 

Flyer, Women’s Suffrage Trail in Olympia

See also the following links to learn more about women’s role, and the history of women’s suffrage, in Olympia history:

Women’s Suffrage History in Olympia
Women’s History in Olympia National Register 
Women’s History Walking  Tour
toggle Women’s History theme in Where Are We? interactive map

Posted in Geographic, Women's History | Comments Off on Olympia Women’s Suffrage Trail

The Spotlighters – 7/14/19

Father Eugene Kellenbenz was a renowned liturgical composer and faculty member at St. Martin’s College in Lacey. But he also enjoyed music on the lighter side, and is shown here in 1964 with the Spotlighters, St. Martin’s glee club, who were rehearsing for a concert to honor the Sisters of Providence. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on The Spotlighters – 7/14/19

July 4, 1889 – 7/7/19

On July 4, 1889 the S.S. T.J. Potter and the S.S. Fleetwood, members of Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet, steam into the Port of Olympia. The day was a particularly important one in our state’s history. Besides being our nation’s Independence Day, it was on this day that Washington Territory assembled delegates to begin writing a state constitution. Washington officially became a state on November 11 of that year. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Silas Wray photo, July 4, 1889, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on July 4, 1889 – 7/7/19

Emiline Himes – 6/30/19

Pioneer Emiline Himes is shown here with her knitting, in this photo taken around 1880. Mrs. Himes was the mother of George Himes, one of the first and most prolific historians of Oregon and Washington Territory. After crossing west on the Oregon Trail, Emiline and her husband settled in what is now Lacey. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

undated photo, probably about 1880, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Emiline Himes – 6/30/19

Crosby store – 6/16/19

Nathaniel Crosby III was the son of a sea captain whose family settled in Tumwater in early days. Nathaniel, the central figure in this photo, operated this store for several years. He and his wife Cordelia built the Crosby House in Tumwater, which still exists, one of the few spared when I-5 was built. Crosby was the grandfather of crooner Bing Crosby.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Crosby store – 6/16/19

Anna Blom – 6/9/19

Anna Blom, a Russian immigrant, opened the Anna Blom Book Shop in 1938 at the current location of Drees. She was a beloved and long-time fixture in downtown Olympia, presiding over the store until 1968. The bookshop still exists, now called Browser’s, on Capitol Way. Anna is pictured here surrounded by some of the thousands of books at the store. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, 1964, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Anna Blom – 6/9/19

Capt. Duncan Finch – 6/2/19

Captain Duncan Finch began his sailing profession in New York, then navigated the Horn to California. In about 1868 he arrived in Puget Sound, where he pursued a distinguished career as captain of the wood-burning steamer Eliza Anderson. He is described as a “cold water man,” that is, anti-alcohol, and permitted no alcoholic beverages to be served on vessels he captained.

William Shew photo, around 1875, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Capt. Duncan Finch – 6/2/19

Jury Selection – 5/26/19

In this photograph from 1963, a blindfolded Mary Hall, Thurston County clerk, selects slips of paper with prospective jurors’ names from a hopper and hands them to Judge Charles Wright. Rosemary Ewer transcribes their names. The process was developed to ensure that jury selection was fair and impartial. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. : Daily Olympian photo, October 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Jury Selection – 5/26/19

Katherine Musgrove milliner – 5/19/19

This photograph of milliner Katherine Eugley Musgrove is one of a series, taken by Robert Esterly around 1914, of local businesses and their owners. Mrs. Musgrove was one of a handful of female proprietors in downtown Olympia. A milliner is a hat maker, an important trade in days when a woman’s hat defined her status in society. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Robert Esterly photo, circa 1914, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Katherine Musgrove milliner – 5/19/19

Computer Disk – 5/12/19

Phyllis Olsen and Nelson Osborn, students at the Olympia Vocational Technical Institute (now South Puget Sound Community College), fire up a new data storage disk machine. The machine was rented for $244 a month and could store 6 disks for a total of .2 megabytes (for comparison, this digital image is about 12 times that size and storage cost a few pennies) Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, September 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Computer Disk – 5/12/19

Mosquito Fleet Messenger – 5/5/19

The Messenger was a member of the Mosquito Fleet of steam-power vessels that plied that waters of Puget Sound. The small stern-wheeler had separate compartments for ladies and gentlemen. In this photo from around the 1880s, she pulls up alongside an unnamed dock.

undated photo, courtesy State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Mosquito Fleet Messenger – 5/5/19

Chambers Cherry Tree – 4/28/19

In 1850, pioneer David Chambers purchased a Black Heart cherry sapling from Oregon-based orchardist Henderson Lewelling and planted it on his homestead, now the site of Panorama retirement community in Lacey. The tree lived to an immense age and size and continued to bear cherries until the 1920s. In this photograph from around 1912, the tree is with members of the Chambers family; the homestead is behind them. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. circa 1912 photo, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Chambers Cherry Tree – 4/28/19

Capital City Forging Moves – 4/21/19

 

In August 1963, Capital City Forging was forced to relocate from its site in downtown Olympia, to make way for the establishment of new recreational facilities at Capitol Lake. In this Daily Olympian photo, co-owner John Plantenberg and his crew prepare to move a huge air hammer out of the 43 year old building. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, August 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Capital City Forging Moves – 4/21/19

1949 Earthquake – 4/14/19

Sixty years ago, on April 13, Olympia experienced the most destructive earthquake in recent memory. In this photograph taken the following day, hardware store owner Oscar Kincy surveys the damage to his downtown store. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

April 14, 1949 photograph, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 1949 Earthquake – 4/14/19

Arbor Day at the State Capital Museum – 4/7/19

On a rainy Arbor Day in 1963, Governor Albert Rosellini plants a tree on the grounds of the State Capital Museum. With the governor are museum staffers and naturalist Margaret McKenny. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Daily Olympian photo, April 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Arbor Day at the State Capital Museum – 4/7/19

Daffodil Princesses – 3/31/19

The Daffodil Festival has been held in Pierce county annually since the 1930s. Here the 1964 daffodil princesses make a goodwill stop at the Hotel Olympian in downtown Olympia in advance of the event. Daffodil parade entrants from Olympia that year included a 50 foot yacht, and the Lakefair Float, which won a prize for best portraying the theme of the state’s Diamond Jubilee. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. unknown photographer, March 1964, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives. 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Daffodil Princesses – 3/31/19

3/10/19 – Artesian Fountain

In this photo from 1963, Olympia native Walt Hamilton fills a jug with artesian water at a fountain on the corner of 4th Avenue and Washington Street. Although he had moved to Yuma, Arizona, he made a point of bringing back the good water whenever he visited his hometown. The fountain was removed several years ago.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 3/10/19 – Artesian Fountain

Rossell Galbraith O’Brien – 3/17/19

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we bring you this photograph of Rossell Galbraith O’Brien, an Irish immigrant who rose to become a Brigadier General in the Washington National Guard. O’Brien is said to have initiated the custom of standing for the National Anthem. He was a long-time resident of Olympia and served on the City Council for several years. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Isaac Davidson photograph, around 1890, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Rossell Galbraith O’Brien – 3/17/19

Harry McElroy – 3/3/19

A young Harry McElroy poses in a studio portrait from around 1865. Harry was the son of Olympia’s first newspaper publisher, Thornton McElroy. Until the early 20th century, it was customary for young boys to be dressed in skirts or dresses until they were “breeched” at around age 3 or 4. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Harry McElroy – 3/3/19

Central School with Jesse Mars 2/24/19

Students and teachers line up outside the Central School, located at Union and Washington, in a photo from 1883. Among the students, seated in front, is Jesse Mars, who served as Olympia’s first Black firefighter from the age of 13. The school building still exists, now at the corner of Adams and Union. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

A.D. Rogers Photo, 1883, State Library collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Central School with Jesse Mars 2/24/19

Seamart – 2/17/19

The Seamart store was a sprawling complex in the Port of Olympia that featured everything from groceries to amusement rides. In this undated photo, likely from the 1970s, a manager proudly displays the produce section of the store. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Merle Junk photo, Susan Parish collection, Washington  State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Seamart – 2/17/19

ZIP code introduced – 2/10/19

The ZIP code was introduced in 1963, to facilitate sorting and delivering United States mail. In this publicity photo, Thurston County resident Carol Bjorklund demonstrates the correct use of the ZIP on an oversized envelope.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on ZIP code introduced – 2/10/19

Gerry Alexander

Justice Alexander has deep Washington roots. He was born in Aberdeen, and, at an early age, moved with his family to Olympia. He attended Garfield grade school and then graduated from Olympia High School, which, at the time, was located within sight of the Temple of Justice. After receiving an undergraduate degree in history from the University of Washington, he served as a lieutenant in the United States Army Infantry, and then returned to his alma mater to earn his J.D. in 1964. He was president of the Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity during his final year of law school.

Alexander practiced law privately in Olympia for nine years with the firm of Parr, Baker, Alexander and Cordes. During his years in private practice he was involved in a number of bar efforts to improve the legal profession and served a term as president of the Thurston-Mason County Bar Association. Alexander served as a judge of the superior court for Thurston and Mason Counties from 1973 through 1984, and as a judge for the Court of Appeals, Division Two, from 1985 through 1994.

Justice Alexander was first elected to a seat on the Washington Supreme Court in 1994 and re-elected in 2000. Shortly thereafter, his colleagues elected him to a four-year position as chief justice, and re-elected him as chief in 2004 and again in 2008. Although Justice Alexander stepped down as chief justice in January 2011, his nine years of service in that position give him the distinction of being the longest running chief justice in the state’s history. He retired from the Supreme Court on December 31, 2011. In February 2012, he became “of counsel” to the Olympia Law Firm of Bean, Gentry, Wheeler and Peternell, limiting his practice to arbitration and mediation and consulting on appellate procedure.

Justice Alexander has been involved in legal education and served on several boards, commissions and committees advising on legal matters, including chairing the Board for Judicial Administration and serving on the Statute Law Committee of the State of Washington. He is a co-founder and board member of the Washington Courts Historical Society and co-chaired the State Capitol Furnishings Preservation Committee, to help refurbish and care for the Temple of Justice and other Capitol Group buildings. Justice Alexander has also been active in his community serving in various capacities on local charitable, religious, and civic organizations. He was active in efforts to save and preserve the 1930s era Thurston County Courthouse and served as president for the Bigelow House Preservation Association.

Justice Alexander has been designated as a distinguished alumnus of the University of Washington Law School and has been awarded a Doctor of Laws by Gonzaga University. In 2012, the Legal Foundation of Washington presented him with the Charles A. Goldmark Distinguished Service Award.

He is the proud father of three adult children and has nine grandchildren.

Posted in Board Members | Comments Off on Gerry Alexander

Pablo G. (Paul) Campos

Paul is a long-time Olympia area resident, moving to Olympia shortly after joining the staff at the Washington State Senate. He is married to Mary Ann and their three children all graduated from Olympia High School. Paul was raised in the small town of Harrah in the Yakima Valley. He graduated from White Swan High School and went on to the University of Washington where he worked at the UW Law Library. Paul interned for and then joined the staff of U.S. Senator Dan Evans where, as one of the last hires, Paul was charged with archiving the Senator’s Seattle office papers. Hired to the State Senate in 1991, Paul has held a number of positions, including stints as Deputy in 2003-2004 and again in 2015-2017. While on staff, Paul is responsible for the historic publications of the Senate and the Legislature, including maintaining the Members of the Legislature book, the lists of Women in the Legislature, and curator of the two-volume History of the Legislature by Don Brazier. Paul is also the Senate’s designee to the Capitol Furnishings and Preservation Committee which works on the Legislative Buildings historic furnishings.

 

Posted in Board Members | Comments Off on Pablo G. (Paul) Campos

2/3/19 – Dedication of End of Oregon Trail Monument

A group of men, women, and children gather around the End of the Oregon Trail monument, in Sylvester Park, at its dedication in 1913. The bearded gentleman at the right of the image is Ezra Meeker, who helped to publicize and celebrate the significance of the Oregon Trail. Governor Lister is in the center. The monument was installed by the Sacajawea Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Collier, 1913, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 2/3/19 – Dedication of End of Oregon Trail Monument

1/27/19 – Grand Mound Oregon Trail dedication

A group of local citizens, pioneer descendants, and historians pose for their photograph at the 1916 dedication of the Oregon Trail Monument in Grand Mound. The monument, shown draped in a U.S. flag, was one of several erected by the Daughters and Sons of the American Revolution to commemorate the historic mass migration.  The monument still exists, on Old Highway 99.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 1/27/19 – Grand Mound Oregon Trail dedication

1/20/19 – Fallout Shelter practice

Threats of nuclear fallout were much on the public’s mind in the early 1960s. Here, youngsters Doug Drew and Donald Collins pose for their photo, having demonstrated they could survive a week in a simulated fallout shelter (with their parents’ permission and periodic contributions of food). Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 1/20/19 – Fallout Shelter practice

1/13/19 – Legislative Page uniforms

Legislative pages Tom Harris and Pascual Pellizzia model page uniforms from the present (1963) and past. The older uniforms had recently been discovered at the State Capital Museum. With the boys are their legislative sponsors Harry Lewis and Charles Savage. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 1/13/19 – Legislative Page uniforms

Benjamin Hartsuck – 1/6/19

Benjamin Hartsuck was the first architect registered in Olympia. His most lasting contribution was as supervising architect for the Old State Capitol building, now the Superintendent of Public Instruction building in downtown Olympia. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Benjamin Hartsuck – 1/6/19

Andy Crow – 12/30/18

A young Andy Crow repairs pipes of the Wurlitzer organ at the Olympic movie theater, in this 1963 photograph. When the theater was headed for demolition, Crow bought and restored the magnificent organ, which was then re-installed at the same site, now the Washington Center for the Performing Arts. The renamed Andy Crow Wurlitzer continues to delight audiences with performances at regular silent movie showings. Crow died in 2016. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Andy Crow – 12/30/18

SS Nisqually – 12/23/18

The S.S. Nisqually, a member of the Mosquito Fleet, steams along Puget Sound. The Mosquito Fleet is the name given to the dozens of small steamers that plied the waters of the Sound in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on SS Nisqually – 12/23/18

Proffitt’s – 12/16/18

The Proffitt’s Department store was a fixture of downtown Olympia for many years. The building is now the site of the New Caldonia mini-mall on Fifth Avenue. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. May 1970, unknown photographer, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Proffitt’s – 12/16/18

Frederick J.X. Miller – 12/2/18

Frederick J.X. Miller, shown here, was a prolific Thurston County writer and poet. He and his sisters donated the family property to the State of Washington provided it be maintained as a park, now Millersylvania State Park. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Julius Asher photo, about 1880, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Frederick J.X. Miller – 12/2/18

View from the Westside – 11/19/18

In this photograph from around 1904, we are looking across the Fourth Avenue Bridge towards downtown Olympia, from the Westside. Visible buildings that still exist include the Old State Capitol Building (now Superintendent of Public Instruction), with its clock tower still intact; and the Iverson and Overhulse homes in foreground left. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. 

C.S. Reeves photo, around 1904, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on View from the Westside – 11/19/18

Jack Gimblet’s boxer – 11/4/18

Early Olympia saloon keeper Jack Gimblet had this professional photograph taken of his handsome boxer “Jerry” in this image from around the turn of the century.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. 

unknown photographer, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Jack Gimblet’s boxer – 11/4/18

Sam McClellan – 10/21/18

Sam McClellan (or McClelland) was a businessman and chief of the Olympia Fire Department. He poses here in his uniform in a photograph from the late 1800s. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Frank Camps photograph, undated, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Sam McClellan – 10/21/18

Roe sisters – 10/14/18

The two Roe sisters Jeannine and Sharon, along with their mother and an instructor, Mrs. Carl Neal, have fun with hand-made puppets as part of Olympia’s 1963 summer activity program. One of the sisters, Jeannine, later served on the Olympia City Council. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Roe sisters – 10/14/18

James Spirlock – 10/7/18

James T. Spirlock arrived in Thurston County in 1858, and settled in the Mima Mounds area. His property, now the Nelson Ranch, has been in the family ever since and is being farmed by the fourth and fifth generations of his descendants. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Courtesy Washington State Historical Society. For additional links about James Spirlock, see our Residents page and scroll to Spirlock. 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on James Spirlock – 10/7/18

Sun Wo – 9/23/18

Olympia photographer Ida Smith capture this photograph of Chinese entrepreneur Sun Wo in traditional garb in about 1890-1910. Chinese merchants were an important element of commerce in the 19th and early 20th century. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sun Wo – 9/23/18

Kenney family at Woodland Hotel

In this undated photograph, members of the Kenney family proudly pose in front of the Woodland Hotel that they operated. Woodland was the original name for the community that is now the City of Lacey, and the hotel was located at a key intersection near the current location of the Lacey Post Office. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 8/26/18

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Kenney family at Woodland Hotel

Welcoming Pole at State Capital Museum – 9/9/18

In 1963 a welcoming pole was created for the State Capital Museum at the Lord Mansion that replicated the poles at the entrance to the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. The poles were designed by famed architect Fred Bassetti. Only a small portion of the pole still exists, deteriorating on the grounds of the mansion. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Welcoming Pole at State Capital Museum – 9/9/18

Port of Olympia in 1910 – 9/2/18

This photograph by Asahel Curtis shows members of the Mosquito Fleet approaching Percival Landing at the Port of Olympia on an overcast day in 1910. The Sand Man tug is at the left, near the same location you can find it today. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. 

Asahel Curtis photograph, 1910, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Port of Olympia in 1910 – 9/2/18

Bulletin – 9/1/18

September 1, 2018

Fall is just around the corner, bringing with it changing colors and fascinating History events! Today, we note with sadness the sudden death of accomplished area historian and writer John Hough while on vacation in South Africa. John was a past president and board member of the Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society, and recently co-wrote “Maritime Olympia and South Puget Sound” with Les Eldridge, documenting the South Sound’s evolution to an important international seaport. Mr. Hough’s detailed obituary may be viewed online at https://funeralalternatives.org/, a full clickable link is included at the bottom of this bulletin, just below the orange box. A memorial service will be held at South Puget Sound Community College on September 15 at 2:00 PM. To hear John discuss some of the early maritime history of the Olympia area and the famed Mosquito Fleet, visit “Now Where Were We” on Youtube. See the clickable link to the video at the bottom of the bulletin.

___________________________________________________________________

* September 4, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Harbor History Museum (Gig Harbor): Gig Harbor Literary Society Discusses “Sarah Canary”.

When black-cloaked Sarah Canary wandered into a railway camp in the Washington territories in 1873, she had no notion of the adventures she was about to face, including being referred to as “The ugliest woman imaginable” and a period of commitment to a local insane asylum. Join the Gig harbor Literary Society for a fascinating discussion of this engaging work. Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722. The Harbor History Museum is located at 4121 Harborview Dr, Gig Harbor.

**********

* September 7, 7:30 PM. Schneebeck Concert Hall (Tacoma): Jacobsen Series – Bernstein 100.

Famed conductor Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday was August 25, 2018. Celebrating Bernstein’s legacy as a composer, conductor, and intellectual, Anna Wittstruck will emcee an evening of classical music, jazz, and Broadway. Featuring soloists Maria Sampen, violin; Dawn Padula, mezzo-soprano; Tanya Stambuk, piano; Tracy Knoop, saxophone/clarinet; and other faculty and student performers. Established in 1984, the Jacobsen Series celebrates faculty and guest talent in a variety of performances held at Schneebeck Concert Hall. The Schneebeck Concert Hall is located on the campus of the University of Puget Sound, 1567-1625 N Union Ave, Tacoma.

**********

* September 8, 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Timberland Library (Olympia): Beginning Genealogy Workshop.

Olympia Genealogical Society members will help workshop participants gain the skills they need to begin their family history research. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop if they have one, and a lunch for the 30-minute break. Check in at 9:00 AM, before the library opens, at the 9th and Adams Exit Only doors to the library. Registration is required and walk-ins will not be accepted. Register online, at http://www.olygensoc.org/, in person, or by phone at 360-352-0595. The Olympia Timberland Library is located at 313 8th Ave SE, Olympia.

**********

* September 8, 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Harvest Home Festival.

Join the Living History Museum to celebrate the sights, sounds, and smells of autumn at their Harvest Home festival! The day will include popular Victorian games, traditional music and dance performances, and the arrival of the hock cart carrying the last sheaf of wheat through the fort to the granary. Everyone is welcome to come down and press cider, make a corn dolly, and help us send off summer 19th century style. For more information visit fortnisqually.org or call (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

**********

* September 8, 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM. Chehalis Timberland Library (Chehalis): Tales from the Parks – Author Talk with Russell Cahill.

The National Park Service celebrated their 100th birthday in 2016, but the origin of America’s parks goes all the way back to the Civil War and beyond. Author Russell Cahill thinks it started when a single tree was cut down in California in 1852. Cahill was a National Park Ranger during the 1960’s and 1970’s and has written on the origins of our parks and his adventures in Yosemite, Alaska, Washington D.C. and Hawai’i. Join him and hear of rescues, forest fires, bears breaking into a five star hotel and other happenings. Books will be available for purchase and signing. The Chehalis Timberland Library is located at 400 N. Market Blvd, Chehalis.

**********

* September 8, 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM. Asia Pacific Cultural Center (Tacoma): We Are History Keepers – Tacoma!

We Are History Keepers – Tacoma! is a free daylong workshop on preserving the historical and cultural record of your family and community – a program brought to you by the Ethnic Heritage Council, the University of Washington Libraries, and the Washington State Historical Society. Sessions will include: small group instruction on sorting and preserving papers and records of your family and cultural organizations; creating exhibits; organizing and preserving your photo collections; conducting oral histories; cultural preservation through storytelling; and more! Library, archives, and museum professionals from the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections, UW Tacoma Library, and the Washington State Historical Society will lead the program. The Asia Pacific Cultural Center will serve a delicious lunch of Asian Pacific foods for a $15 cash donation per person. Reserve lunch and indicate vegetarian, if required, when you RSVP to: rsvp@ethnicheritagecouncil.org. Participants are also invited to share a completed history project or work in progress. If you or your youth have a visual display to exhibit, please let us know when you RSVP for the event. We Are History Keepers! is co-created by the Ethnic Heritage Council and the University of Washington Libraries. Tacoma History Keepers! is funded in part by the Washington State Historical Society, the Heritage League of Pierce County and 4 Culture. The Asia Pacific Cultural Center is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way, Tacoma.

**********

* September 9, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM. Tumwater Historic District (Tumwater): Voices from the Past.

On Sunday, September 9, three talented living history reenactors will give performances at period homes located in Tumwater’s Historic District. Staggered start times will allow the public to hear all three presentations. Beginning at Schmidt House at 1:00 PM, storyteller Kristin Alana will portray Rebecca Groundage Howard, an African-American woman who operated the Pacific House, a restaurant and hotel in Olympia in the 1860’s and ‘70’s. At 2:00 PM, reenactor Karen Haas will visit Crosby House to portray Norwegian immigrant Thea Foss, who in 1912 bought a used rowboat in Tacoma and built a maritime empire on Puget Sound. At 2:45 PM at Henderson House, long-time reenactor Ray Egan will portray one of his favorite historic personalities, Ezra Meeker. Meeker’s reminiscence begins with his first experiences working with oxen, and continues with a discussion of what oxen are and are not, and why they were vitally important on the Oregon Trail. All three Houses will be open for tours before and after the performances. Schmidt House is located at 330 Schmidt Place SW, Crosby House is located at 702 Deschutes Way SW, and Henderson House is located at 602 Deschutes Way SW, all in Tumwater. For more information, contact Karen Johnson at karen@olytumfoundation.org or 360-890-2299.

**********

* September 10, 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society (Tacoma): Some Mid Life History of Tacoma Rail.

Join the Tacoma Historical Society for their first monthly meeting of the fall, and hear local railroad historian, photographer, and author of multiple articles on railroading David Cantlinas discuss the history of rail in the Tacoma area. Admission is free and all are welcome! This event will take place at the Murray Board Room of the Wheelock Student Center, University of Puget Sound, located at 1500 N Warner St, Tacoma.

**********

* September 13, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): The Darker Side of Tumwater’s History.

Olympia Tumwater Foundation’s Public History Manager Don Trosper will begin a new season of History Talks at Schmidt House with an illustrated talk highlighting the darker side of Tumwater’s history. Learn how newspapers of the day reported on murder, political intrigue, scandal, immorality, tragedy, racism, conflict, and Trosper’s personal favorite, “Strange Events.” Schmidt House is located at 330 Schmidt Place SW, Tumwater.

**********

* September 13, 7:00 PM – 8:15 PM. Lacey Timberland Library (Lacey): Antiquated Technologies Series – Moving Pictures with Devon Damonte.

Witness a plethora of 16mm & 35mm movie viewing and projecting apparatus, including a running upright Moviola editing machine once used by film director Hal Ashby (Being There, Harold & Maude, etc). Help celebrate Devon’s latest acquisition: a Tagarno 35mm medical viewer that plays both in high speed and in super slow motion. These technologies have withstood the test of time – what other media format has remained playable for over 100 years? This program is part of the Antiquated Technologies series and is sponsored by the Friends of the Lacey Library. The Lacey Timberland Library is located at 500 College St SE, Lacey.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Bulletin – 9/1/18

St. Peter introduces television in rooms – 8/26/18

In 1963, St. Peter Hospital, then located in West Olympia, introduced the opportunity for patients to have televisions in their rooms. Here, Mrs. Herb (Shirley) Legg, a volunteer at the hospital, demonstrates its use to a grateful patient. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information, visit the Society’s Looking Back page, https://olympiahistory.org/category/lookingback/. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1963, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on St. Peter introduces television in rooms – 8/26/18

Plaque dedication – 8/19/18

In 1913, a group of Olympia citizens, many of them early pioneers, gathered to dedicate a plaque at the site of the first Washington Territorial Assembly. This plaque is still in existence, in front of the Bread Peddler at 222 Capitol Way N, in the port area. The site is one of the most important in our community’s and territory’s history. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information is available at olympiahistory.org. 

unknown photographer, 1913, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Plaque dedication – 8/19/18

5th Avenue Dam Construction – 8/12/18

Few landmarks still exist to identify this August 1949 scene as the future site of the 5th Avenue dam and bridge. This photograph was taken as construction was getting under way. In the distance we can just make out the Governor Hotel, the Dolliver Building, and the Security Building. We can also see the smokestack of the Memorial Clinic building that was demolished in 2015. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Merle Junk photograph, 1949, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 5th Avenue Dam Construction – 8/12/18

August 1909 special session – 8/5/18

In 1909, a special summer session of the Legislature was called, resulting in Session lasting until mid-August. A group of young women, all legislative clerks, posed for a group photo in Governor Hays’s automobile, still a relative rarity in Olympia. Behind them are the Old State Capitol Building, now the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Reed Building. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org.

unknown photographer, 1909, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on August 1909 special session – 8/5/18

Lower Capitol Way – 7/29/18

The Port of Olympia was the hub of commercial activity in Olympia’s earliest decades. By 1910, when this photograph was taken, it was in decline: even the Red Light District had moved elsewhere. The old Bettman store is at foreground left, with the New England Hotel to its right, now the site of the 222 shopping and dining complex. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Lower Capitol Way – 7/29/18

Earl Bean in 1963 – 7/22/18

Earl Bean came here from Russia in 1892 and joined his father Joseph in the scrap metal business. He parlayed this into hardware store Olympia Supply on the shore of Capitol Lake, still part of the Bean family. In the 1930s Earl Bean was one of the founders of Temple Beth Hatfiloh. In this photo from 1963, Earl looks back on his distinguished career. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information is available at olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1953, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Earl Bean in 1963 – 7/22/18

View from Old State Capitol – 7/15/18

This photograph was taken about 1900 from the Old State Capitol Building (now Superintendent of Public Instruction). Dominating the image is the Olympia Hotel, which burned down in 1904. Other identifiable buildings include the Sylvester Mansion and steepled St. Michael Parish. The home in the foreground belonged to Mitchel Harris. It still exists, but was moved to the southeast corner of 9th and Adams. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on View from Old State Capitol – 7/15/18

Natalie Riggin – 7/8/18

Natalie Riggin won Second Grand Prize in the national Pillsbury Bakeoff contest in 1956, when she was only a teenager. Her Hoot Owl cookies are still included in compilations of best cookie recipes of all time. Natalie was later Lakefair Queen in 1962, the third young woman to earn that title. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Here’s a link to the recipe: https://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/hoot-owl-cookies/

Daily Olympian photo, 1956, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Natalie Riggin – 7/8/18

Trena Belsito Worthington with the Rosellinis – 6/17/18

Olympia attorney Trena Belsito Worthington, at left, confers with Governor Albert and First Lady Ethel Rosellini as they barbecue a fish on Capitol Campus. In addition to being a successful lawyer, in an age where female attorneys were rare, Mrs. Worthington was responsible for the design and construction of five nearly identical homes in southeast Olympia and along Capitol Lake.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information about Mrs. Worthington is available at olympiahistory.org in our Residents feature, under her maiden name Trena Selvidge. 

Daily Olympian photo, late 1950s, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Trena Belsito Worthington with the Rosellinis – 6/17/18

Fish at City Hall – 5/27/18

In this Daily Olympian photo from summer 1966, Olympia city staffers stock the water feature at the new City Hall with fish. Since the “moat” was never intended as a fish pond, all the fish died shortly thereafter. This building complex is now the Lee Creighton Justice Center. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information is available at olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1966, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Fish at City Hall – 5/27/18

Tumwater Long Bridge – 5/20/18

In this early photograph from about 1880, we see the Tumwater Long Bridge spanning the Deschutes Estuary. The homes and businesses of Tumwater are in the background; they succumbed to I-5 construction in the 1960s. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information is available at olympiahistory.org. 

State Capital Museum collection, courtesy Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Tumwater Long Bridge – 5/20/18

Knights of Pythias Parade – 5/13/18

In June of 1894, during the “golden age of fraternalism” in America, members of the Grand Lodge Knights of Pythias parade up a rain- and mud-soaked Capitol Way in Olympia. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information, visit olympiahistory.org. 

William Duckering photo, 1894, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Knights of Pythias Parade – 5/13/18

1965 Earthquake – 4/29/18

A magnitude 6.7 earthquake hit the Pacific Northwest on April 29, 1965, causing 7 deaths and millions of dollars of damage. In this photograph from the Daily Olympian, a postal worker at the brand-new Olympia post office examines the havoc wreaked by the quake. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photograph, April 1965, State Capital Museum Collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on 1965 Earthquake – 4/29/18

Olympia Voc Tech – 4/22/18


Olympia Vocational Technical Institute student Kent Loomey demonstrates a cathode ray oscilloscope in this photograph from 1963. The Institute (later South Puget Sound Community College) was located in the former Montgomery Ward Building in downtown Olympia. The Institute held an open house to familiarize citizens with the new school, and to publicize the fact that it was no longer the place for residents to place their mail-order catalogue orders. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photograph, 1963, State Capital Museum Collection, Washington State Historical Society

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Olympia Voc Tech – 4/22/18

Millersylvania CCC – 4/15/18

During the Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps hired thousands of young men and put them to work building and improving public amenities. CCC members were responsible for building many of the structures still in place at Millersylvania State Park, outside of Olympia. In this photo, a group of young men are hard at work building one of the kitchen shelters at the park. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. 

circa 1935 photograph, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Millersylvania CCC – 4/15/18

John Montgomery – 4/8/18

In this Daily Olympian photograph from 1966, Washington State Archivist Sid McAlpin puzzles over a jar of ashes of a person identified only as John Montgomery. No one knew who he was or why his ashes were at Archives. In 2014, genealogists identified the ashes as belonging to a 6 year old, and the ashes were then buried with John’s father. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. Daily Olympian photograph, 1966, State Capital Museum Collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on John Montgomery – 4/8/18

Anna and Maggie – 3/25/18

This sweet photograph from around 1870 commemorates the teenaged friendship of early Olympia residents Anna Pullen and Maggie Sutton. Anna later married printer Martin Kelly and Maggie became a teacher in Tumwater. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. 

circa 1870 photograph, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Anna and Maggie – 3/25/18

Peace Pilgrim – 3/18/18

Peace Pilgrim, born Mildred Lisette Norman, was an American non-denominational spiritual teacher and peace activist. Starting on January 1, 1953, in Pasadena, California, she adopted the name “Peace Pilgrim” and walked across the United States for 28 years, advocating for world peace. She’s shown here in 1966, walking by the Daily Olympian building at State and Capitol (now the Olympia Press Building). Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photograph, 1966, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Peace Pilgrim – 3/18/18

St. Peter Hospital – Sherman St

By the 1920s, St. Peter Hospital had outgrown its original location on what’s now Capitol Campus. The large structure shown here, in West Olympia on Sherman Street, was completed in 1924, and included a nursing school and modern X-ray equipment. In this 1952 photograph, a nurse and Sister of Providence attend a patient. The building is now an apartment complex. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information, visit olympiahistory.org. 1952 photograph, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives 

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on St. Peter Hospital – Sherman St

St. Peter Hospital – 3/4/18

St. Peter Hospital was founded by the Sisters of Charity of the House of Providence in 1887, and served the needs of area residents, including many injured loggers. Its original location, on what’s now Capitol Campus, is marked by a plaque across from the current Department of Enterprise Services (GA) building. The hospital has moved twice since then. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. A.D. Rogers Photograph, 1895, Susan Parish Collection, Washington State Archives

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on St. Peter Hospital – 3/4/18

Star Laundry – 2/25/18

This photograph of the jovial proprietors of the Star Laundry is one of a series, by photographer Robert Esterly, of local businesspeople. Located on Capitol Way in the bustling Port area, Star Laundry catered to the needs of itinerant sailors and merchants. It existed until the 1960s, eventually growing to take up the large masonry building that is now the home of Lassen Electric. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information is available at olympiahistory.org. 

Esterly Photograph, 1914, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Star Laundry – 2/25/18

Dr. Lucie Cook

This photograph of Doctor Lucie Cook and her child is one of a series of local businesses and their owners taken by photographer Robert Esterly. Dr. Cook’s office was located in the Port area. Her patients were mostly female, and she is known to have ministered to some of the less fortunate members of Olympia society.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.

Esterly Photograph, 1914, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Dr. Lucie Cook

Roger Easton pen pal – 2/11/18

Roger Easton, a teacher at Mountain View Elementary in Lacey, initiated an international pen pal program between his students and children from around the world. In addition to sending letters, the children exchanged audiotapes. Easton was also an avid local historian; at his untimely death he bequeathed his estate to the Olympia Historical Society and the Bigelow House Preservation Association. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information, visit olympiahistory.org. 

Daily Olympian photo, 1966, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Roger Easton pen pal – 2/11/18

Olympia Opera House – 2/4/18

Publisher John Miller Murphy built the Olympia Opera House on Fourth Avenue, about where Orca Books is now. As this photograph from 1890 shows, a trolley line ran by the theater, providing easy access to all classes of Olympia society. Over its 30 years of existence some of the biggest national names played here, including John Phillips Sousa, Mark Twain, and others, as well as numerous local performers. Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. For more information see olympiahistory.org. 

unknown photographer, 1890, State Library Collection

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Olympia Opera House – 2/4/18

Street vendor – 1/28/18

Photographer Robert Esterly took this photograph of an unnamed street vendor in 1914, as part of his series of local businesses and their proprietors. The photo was taken at the corner of 4th and Washington. The Boardman Building, still in existence, is behind the vendor at the northwest corner.  Photograph selected and captioned by Deborah Ross on behalf of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. More information is available at olympiahistory.org.

Esterly Photograph, 1914, State Capital Museum collection, Washington State Historical Society

Posted in Looking Back - Images from page 2 of the Sunday Olympian | Comments Off on Street vendor – 1/28/18