Tag Archives: Wohleb

Chambers, Joseph and Marion House

Location: 2519 Fire Ct SE
Local register

No vintage photograph has been located; if you have one to share, please contact usOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJoseph and Marion Chambers house today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

Until well into the 20th century, the Boulevard Road section of east Olympia was rural, consisting of modest homes, many with fruit and nut orchards (see also Piety Hill listing). The home shown here was built by Joseph Bert and Marion Chambers in about 1915. (Chambers, listed as a farmer in census data, does not appear to be related to the Chambers family from Lacey or A.H. Chambers, mayor of Olympia.) Although described in the inventory as a Craftsman style, it has many elements of the Foursquare style that would have predominated at that time. It was constructed out of the hazelnut and holly trees in the area; many of these trees’ descendants are still in existence. The home is on the local register.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

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Clark, John House

Location: 2932 Orange St. SE
Wohleb

clark 1941John Clark House 1941, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State ArchivesClark HouseJohn Clark House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

The John Clark House is one of several concrete brick homes built around 1940 in the neighborhood of Eskridge and  Orange Streets, in the Stratford Place plat that was developed by Frederick Schmidt and his partners (see the Frederick Schmidt House, the Frank Schmidt House, the Fox House, and the Robert Wohleb Cottage). The design for this and other homes in the plat were by Joseph Wohleb; however, Frederick Schmidt researched and specified the use of concrete bricks. This building material was used for several of the homes in the area that were developed by Frederick, partly due to the shortage of wood during World War II.

The home is inventoried but not on the local register.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

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Goodyear Tire Company Building/First site of United Presbyterian

Location: 421 4th Ave E
Wohleb; Transportation; Religious institutions

JJ_BrennerUnited Presbyterian Church, undated, courtesy of Westminster PresbyterianBayviewGoodyear tire building (2013), photo by Deb Ross 

United Presbyterian Church, now Westminster Presbyterian Church, is another participant in the game of “musical pews” described in our listing for Gloria Dei. The church was organized in 1893 in a room of the Hale Block, and grew quickly enough so that a permanent building, pictured at above left, was completed in 1896 at the southwest corner of 4th and Jefferson Streets. In the 1920s, the church built a new brick building further east on Fourth Avenue and sold this structure (that brick building later became the home of the Salvation Army). Westminster is now located on Boulevard Road.

The current art deco style building at this location was designed in 1935 by architect Joseph Wohleb and was a Goodyear Tire Company store. Besides tires, it sold appliances such as washing machines. Its sleek L-shaped style is consistent with the streamlined aesthetic of the early automobile era, and was one of the many buildings along the eastern end of Fourth Avenue to cater to the growing automotive environment of Olympia in the early to mid 20th century. The building is now (2013) a bar.

Thanks to Drew Crooks for research and assistance.

Additional resources:

History of Westminster Presbyterian Church

Olympia Heritage inventory (Goodyear Tire building)

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Memorial Clinic building (demolished)

Location: 529 4th Ave W
Wohleb; mid-Century modern

Memorial Clinic_1949Memorial Clinic building, 1949, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State ArchivesMemorial Clinic building

Memorial Clinic building in 2013, photo by Deb Ross

 

The Memorial  Clinic building was designed by local architect father and son team Robert and Joseph Wohleb and built in 1948. The photograph at above left was taken shortly after it was completed, and a close inspection reveals the Capitol Dome in the background still under repair after the 1949 earthquake. The clinic was an innovative concept at the time, grouping several physicians and specialties under one roof. It was located near downtown but handily close to  St. Peter Hospital, then on Sherman Street. Accordingly, when the current St. Peter Hospital was built in the 1970s, the clinic moved to remain close. The building then served as the Thurston County Department of Health until the 2000s. It was demolished in 2015.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, mid-Century modern walking tour

Looking Back feature, shows interior

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Merryman House

Location: 3520 Boulevard Rd SE

No vintage photograph of this house has been located; if you have one to share, please contact us.???????????????????????????????Merryman House today (2014), photo by Deb Ross

The Merryman House was built some time between 1892 and 1903 (sources vary) by Alexander Merryman, who arrived in Thurston County in 1890. It remained in the Merryman family until very recent times. The home was located on a rise, set back from Boulevard Road, which was originally an old trail leading from the Thurston County prairies to the outskirts of Olympia. Merryman built the home out of cedar logged on the property. He cut a trail through his homestead acreage, which later became Morse-Merryman Road. The family operated a blacksmith shop and a dairy on the property as well.

The home was moved slightly to the south in the early 2000s to make way for a housing development, but maintains its original simple pioneer style appearance, including original cedar siding. A signboard at the new location tells the story of the home and the Merryman family.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

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Olympia Junk/Capital City Creamery

Location: 525 Columbia St SW
Diversity: Jewish heritage; Women’s History; Wohleb

Olympia JunkOlympia Junk Co. 1914, Robert Esterly, courtesy of Washington State Historical Societycanvas worksOlympia Junk Co building today (2012) photograph by Matt Kennelly

The building that stands at the northwest corner of Legion and Columbia was built in 1925 to house the Olympia Junk Company. It was designed by famed local architect Joseph Wohleb, with the signature Mission style for which he is known.  The photograph at above left is of a building that stood at this location before the current building was erected. The Olympia Junk Company was founded in about 1906 by local merchant Morris Berkowitz, who is likely pictured in the older photograph. It was purchased by his brother in law Jacob Bean, a member of a prominent Jewish family. The older photograph is part of the historic series of photographs by photographer Robert Esterly taken in late 1914. The successor to Olympia Junk Co. is Olympia Supply, which still operates near this location.

Adjacent to the Olympia Junk Co. (where the parking lot to the north is currently located) was the Capital City Creamery. Founded by F.R. Klumb, the creamery was one of the first in Thurston County. Before the early 20th century, most households kept a cow, even on small city lots, to provide their dairy needs. The establishment of creameries was a result of increased urbanization, and the Creamery introduced sanitary and efficient practices, including pasteurization, as well as delivery trucks. The entire family, including F.R.’s wife Katherine and daughter Minnie, worked at the creamery.  Long-time Olympia historian Winnie Olsen was the daughter of Minnie Klumb.

For more information follow these links:

Olympia Heritage inventory

Washington State Historical Society photograph collection (enter following catalog numbers in Collections Search box): 2010.149.23.1 (above photo); C1993.12.10 (pasteurization process at Capital City Creamery); C1993.12.7; C1993.12.1; 2010.149.23.2 (Esterly photograph of Capital City Creamery)

For more information on the Bean and Klumb families, see our Residents section (B and K)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Schmidt, Frank T. House

Location: 1315 Eskridge Blvd SE
Wohleb

frankschmidt_1942Frank T. Schmidt House 1941, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archivesfrank schmidtFrank Schmidt  House today (2015), photo by Deb Ross

 

The Frank Schmidt House was built in 1939, across the street from Frank’s brother Frederick Schmidt’s home on Orange Street, in a section of Olympia that was being developed by Frederick and his partners. Both Schmidts were members of the family that founded the Olympia Brewing Company, and although both houses are located in Olympia, they are not far from the brewery in Tumwater where most of the Schmidts, including Frank, worked. Frederick Schmidt researched and specified the use of concrete bricks. This building material was used for several of the homes in the area that were developed by Frederick, partly due to the shortage of wood during World War II.

Like the Frederick Schmidt House, the design was by local architect Joseph Wohleb, who departed dramatically from his signature Mission Revival style, once again demonstrating the breadth of his design palette. The home is inventoried but not on the local register.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Schmidt family, see the Residents section of this website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Schmidt, Frederick W. House (Orange St)

Location: 2831 Orange St SE
Local, State and National registers; Wohleb

 

FWSchmidt_1939Frederick W Schmidt House 1939, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State Archives

 

FW Schmidt House

Frederick W Schmidt  House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

 

The elegant and distinctive English Revival style of the Frederick W. Schmidt House, built in 1937-1938, was conceived by Elsa Heiser Schmidt, wife of Frederick W. Schmidt. The family founded the Olympia Brewing Company, and although the house is located in Olympia, it was not far from the brewery in Tumwater where Schmidt worked. While Elsa Heiser Schmidt provided many of the design criteria for the house, Frederick Schmidt researched and specified the use of concrete bricks and radiant heat. Its many unique features are described in the national registry nomination linked below.

The design was by local architect Joseph Wohleb, who departed dramatically from his usual Mission Revival style when he took the commission for this important home. It is listed on the local, state and national registers.

Additional resources:

National Register nomination

Olympia Heritage inventory

For more information on the Schmidt family, see the Residents section of this website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Winstanley House

Location: 127 17th Ave SW
Local register; South Capitol National Historic District

Winstanley House_1938Winstanley House 1938, Thurston County Assessor, Washington State ArchivesOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWinstanley House today (2013), photo by Deb Ross

This house was built about 1910 by Guy Winstanley, who was a partner with Robert Blankenship in a downtown tobacco shop (see article Meet the Yantises and Blankenships). The shop was a popular gathering place for locals and politicians, and Winstanley served for a time on the Olympia City Council and an active member of the Elks. The house is built in the emerging Craftsman style and has a rather whimsical English Revival detailing at the second floor. As can be seen from comparing the two photographs above, it has been meticulously preserved. It is on the local register and in the South Capitol National Historic District.

Additional resources:

Olympia Heritage inventory

South Capitol National Historic District

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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