Category Archives: 2020 Bulletins

Bulletin – 9/1/2020

September 1, 2020     
 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY!

 
September 2020 marks 25 years since the official opening of the Bigelow House Museum. Please help support the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow Museum through our $25 for 25 Campaign! We had planned a special event, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic that won’t be happening, as the Bigelow House Museum is closed for the foreseeable future. In addition, we have had to make the difficult decision to cancel our biggest fundraiser, the annual Holiday Tour of Homes. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Museum, and due to cancellation of fundraising events, we are asking our friends to consider an extra donation this year. We recognize that economic fallout from the pandemic may make this difficult for some. However, please do consider a $25.00 donation, or whatever amount you can give, to help ensure the future of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Click DONATE to give $25 or any other amount to this campaign, either by credit card or with your PayPal account. Or you can mail us a check; go to our Get Involved page for more information. If you are not yet a member of the Society and Museum, please consider visiting our  Membership Page and joining now! And, while OHS&BHM fully supports area businesses, we realize that many are finding local shopping difficult in these trying times. If you are an Amazon customer, please consider donating to OHS&BHM through Amazon’s SMILE program. Information can be found at SMILE. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Information is available at the Get Involved link, above.
 

THANK YOU!!!

 
Sylvester’s Window is a nonprofit, educational project that teaches local history through a series of cityscapes created by artist Robert Chamberlain, all drawn from the same perspective: the tower window of Edmund Sylvester’s home in Downtown Olympia. Growing up in Tenino, Chamberlain was drawn to art from an early age, stating in an interview “As a kid in school, I drew pictures instead of doing my class work.” His art appears across Washington, from office walls to coffee mugs. Sylvester’s Window, created between 2000 and 2004, is considered to be Chamberlain’s most significant work. By arrangement with the creator of the project, Lynn Erickson, the Olympia Historical Society and  Bigelow House Museum has posted the eight cityscapes, as well as extensive educational materials and research on our website. The materials are fully word-searchable and a rich source of information about Olympia’s history. The reproductions and materials are made possible by special arrangement with Ms. Erickson. Launch your visit here: Sylvester’s Window.  Originals are displayed at the Olympia branch of Timberland Library. Please respect copyrights; for permission to use any and all materials from this project, contact OHS&BHM at olyhistory@gmail.com.
 
While COVID-19 appears to be plateauing in some areas of Washington, many sites remain closed, and it’s a good idea to CALL BEFORE GOING. Remaining home whenever possible continues to be the best course of action to limit the spread in the Evergreen State. If you need a little inspiration for that during these trying times, give a listen to this prescient tune by British singer songwriter Richard Thompson, from nearly thirty years ago  Keep Your Distance. Click the arrow on that page to play.
 

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  • Washington State Historical Society’s New Head of Collections Asks That You Help Document COVID-19 in the Evergreen State.

Margaret Wetherbee hit the ground running at the Washington State Historical Society, joining the organization days after its buildings closed due to COVID-19 safety protocols. A fifth-generation Washingtonian, her passion for the stories of the Evergreen State began at a young age. Wetherbee has worked as a collections professional at the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum in Tacoma, the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, the Riverside Metropolitan Museum in Riverside, CA and others.  “I’m reaching out to citizens across the state to ask for their participation in documenting this historic event for the Historical Society’s collections. We want to capture what you’re going through right now as it unfolds, because this is an extraordinary time in our history. We will continue to collect as we experience the impacts over the coming years.” Washington’s coronavirus history will be notable as one of the first pandemic hot spots in the United States. The Historical Society’s director, Jennifer Kilmer, remarked, “Future Washingtonians will research these days, asking how we coped with the suddenly vacated office buildings, curtailed services, and medical supply shortages. They’ll want to know how this event impacted our lives on a personal level. Just as we are now looking to the 1918 flu epidemic for insight into our present experience, folks in the future will want to know about our Stay Home/Stay Healthy protocol, and how we managed to come together to help one another.” The Historical Society is asking for digital content including (but not limited to) photographs, audio and video clips, screenshots of social media memes or posts, reports, correspondence, observations and anecdotes. The Historical Society would also like physical objects and ephemera (homemade masks, coronavirus closure notices, decals, diaries, letters, etc.) but asks that you gather and save objects until their Research Center reopens. For details, visit Collecting the COVID-19 Experience .
 

  • Washington State History Museum – IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition, Northwest Native Festival and Virtual Arts Market. 

IN THE SPIRIT is an annual celebration of diverse Native arts and culture. This event traditionally honors the artists whose work has been selected for the IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition, which was unable to be exhibited this year in-museum due to COVID-19, but you can view the Virtual Exhibition online. There will also be an IN THE SPIRIT Virtual Arts Marketplace featuring talented emerging artists and your favorite vendors who normally sell their creations during the festival, which will go live on September 10. Visit In the Spirit Contemporary Native Arts for details and schedule.
 

  • September 5. South Sound Maritime Heritage Association – Scaled-Down, Virtual Olympia Harbor Days Event.   

In 1974, the tugboats and crews of the Puget Sound returned to the beautiful waterfront of Olympia to celebrate the end of the summer season. This gathering was the start of Olympia Harbor Days, an annual FREE family festival dedicated to the community as a celebration of maritime heritage. In 1978 , Harbor Fair, an arts, crafts, food and music festival, was added. Today, Olympia Harbor Days is the third largest festival in Thurston County and home of the World’s Largest Vintage Tugboat Races, attracting over 55,000 visitors annually, featuring 300+ booths, ships, activities, music and food. Touring the tugboats and watching them race remains the highlight of the festival, something “kids” young and old never seem to grow tired of. Due to COVID-19, this year’s event will be LITE, with virtual content ranging from self guided tours along the Percival Landing Boardwalk to an instructional video on creating tugboats out of LEGO! For more information, visit Olympia Harbor Days.
 

  • September 10. Nisqually Health Department 2nd Annual Walk for Hope, Life is Precious Suicide Prevention Event.   

COVID-19 has profound impacts beyond the physical. Social isolation, anxiety, fear of contagion, uncertainty, chronic stress and economic difficulties may lead to the development or worsening of depressive, anxiety, substance use and other psychiatric disorders, including suicide. Addressing the issue of suicide has never been more timely. Visit Suicide Prevention for more information about this virtual event.
 

  • September 14, 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society September Virtual Meeting.

Join THS for their September virtual meeting, which will be shared as a live broadcast on both Youtube  and Facebook at 7 PM on Monday, September 14. The featured speaker will be board president Bill Baarsma, who will share some of his extensive research into Tacoma’s political history with the presentation: The Great Tacoma Recall Election of September 15, 1970, and How it Transformed Tacoma Politics. The meeting will also include the presentation of Tacoma Historical Society’s annual awards, recognizing significant contributions to Tacoma history in a variety of areas. Be sure to tune in to be the first to learn who will be presented with our Murray Morgan Award, Alan C. Liddle Award, and Ronald E. Magden Award!
 

  • September 17, 8:00 AM to September 19, 7:00 PM. Harbor History Museum – History Rocks! Online Auction.  

Join the Museum on Saturday, September 19th, at 6:30 PM for a live stream of their auction program, complete with bidding opportunities and a look at the past 10 years and a peek at what’s to come in the next decade! The auction is the Museum’s biggest fundraiser of the year,  and it needs your support during these challenging times. Today’s stories are the history of tomorrow and the funds raised during History Rocks will help maintain these legacies for the future.  Contributions during History Rocks help to support student educational outreach through the Midway School Program, new virtual programming for students who cannot attend programs in residence, the restoration of the Shenandoah, and the documentation and preservation of our communities’ rich and dynamic stories. This event is FREE and open to the public. For questions, please contact Robin Harrison, Operations and Marketing Manager, at operations@harborhistorymuseum.org. You may Click Here to register.
 

  • September 21, 6:00 PM. Lacey Museum – History Talks! Washington Suffragists: Ahead of Their Time.  

Although 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the federal 19th amendment giving women the right to vote, Washington women won the vote a decade earlier in 1910. Well-known local historian Shanna Stevenson will discuss the history of suffrage in Washington State. Her presentation will include the fascinating tale of local women who played a major role in the movement as well as the pioneering women who were political leaders of Thurston County. This VIRTUAL EVENT will take place Via ZOOM. To register for this free online event, visit Lacey Museum Webinar
 

  • September 25 – 27, 1:00, 5:00 & 7:00 PM. Nisqually Indian Tribe – Annual Wellbriety Pow-Wow.   

Join the Nisqually Nation for their 20th Annual Wellbriety Pow-Wow! This event is open to  Nisqually tribal members, the tribal community and the general public.

Event dates and times include:
           25th: Coastal Jam 5 PM.
           26th: Grand Entry 1 PM & 7 PM.
           27th: Grand Entry 1 PM.
Where: Nisqually Youth and Community Center
Master of Ceremonies: Sonny Eaglespeaker & Casey Wallahee
Arena Director: Buchanan Wallahee
Host Drum: Creekside
Head Man Dancer: Melvin Blacketer
Head Woman Dancer: Bridget Eaglespeaker
 
For vendor space/table and royalty context information please contact: Daydishka McCloud at 360-456-5221, ext. 1239. This event is taking place at the Nisqually Youth and Community Center, located at 1937 Lashi St. S.E. in Olympia.
 

  • September 26, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom (Lakewood): Fall Living History Open House & Annual Used Book Sale.  

Experience life at a fort in the Pacific Northwest!  Living historians in period dress will demonstrate daily activities of soldiers at a 19th Century fort and host guided tours of the historic structures.  Taking place at Quarters 1, 2, 3, and 4 from 10 AM to 4 PM. Additionally, the book sale will be held in Quarters 2 those same hours.  Get terrific bargains on a wide variety of books!  Complimentary admission, but donations are always appreciated. Historic Fort Steilacoom is located on the grounds of Western State Hospital at 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood. 253-582-5838.
 

 
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Bulletin – 8/1/2020

August 1, 2020 
 
Please help support the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow Museum through our $25 for 25 Campaign! September 2020 marks 25 years since the official opening of the Bigelow House Museum. We had planned a special event but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, that won’t be happening, as the Bigelow House Museum is closed for the foreseeable future. In addition, we have had to make the difficult decision to cancel our biggest fundraiser, the annual Holiday Tour of Homes. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Museum, as well as cancellation of fundraising events, we are asking our friends to consider an extra donation this year. We recognize that economic fallout from the pandemic may make this difficult for some. However, please do consider a $25.00 donation, or whatever amount you can give, to help ensure the future of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum. Click on the Donate button at the right of this screen to give $25 or any other amount to this campaign, either by credit card or with your Paypal account. Or you can mail a check to us; go to our GET INVOLVED  page for more information. If you are not yet a member of the Society and Museum, please consider visiting our Membership page Membership Page and joining now! And, while OHS&BHM fully supports area businesses, we realize that many are finding local shopping difficult in these trying times. If you are an Amazon customer, please consider donating to OHS&BHM through Amazon’s SMILE program. Information can be found at SMILE. We also partner with Fred Meyer, and Ralph’s/Bayview Thriftway charitable donation programs. Information is available at the Get Involved link, above.
 
THANK YOU!!!
 
Thematically based on the real life 1909 Suffrage Special train which carried local and national suffragists across our state from Spokane to Seattle in support of Washington women and their fight for the vote, The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop is an eight-episode video series which will explore Washington state’s connections to the larger national history of women’s suffrage, and honors Washington’s women changemakers who led the way then as well as those who continue to do so today. The Virtual Train makes its final stop in Olympia, on August 26, Women’s Equality Day! The Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be hosting this final Whistle Stop of the tour! More information on the Train can be found in the event listings below.
 
If you had planned to attend the Suffrage Celebration event scheduled on the capitol grounds in Olympia this August, note that this event has been canceled due to the pandemic.
 
And finally, this Tuesday, August 4, is the PRIMARY for the upcoming November 3 GENERAL ELECTION. A more consequential election may never have taken place in this nation, certainly in modern times. We need an informed turn out; BE SURE TO VOTE!
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  • August 3 – 7, 10 – 14, 17 – 21, 24 – 28, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – Fort Nisqually Day Camp.

This camp, open to all ages, brings the past to life with stories, songs, crafts and games. Campers live history in an 1855 setting. A daily snack is included.  Guests, patrons and visitors ARE required to use face coverings as well as maintain six feet of physical distance from non-household members and perform frequent hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. This applies to all residents six years old and up,  children under age two are exempt. For kids age 3-5 masks are strongly encouraged. Camp is open to all ages, but children 5 and under must register with parent or guardian. To register your child who is 5 and under contact the Fort at 253-404-3970. Fort Nisqually is located at 5400 N Pearl St #11 Tacoma.
 

  • August 4, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Washington Trust for Historic Preservation – Virtual Panel: Careers in Preservation.

During this virtual panel, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation will be focusing on preservation careers in construction and the trades. These industries are crucial pieces of the cultural and historic resource landscape and provide a wide range professional opportunities—from carpentry and window restoration to project management and engineering—for those interested in saving places that matter. WTPH will be exploring this field with the help of three accomplished preservationists who have traveled different career paths to their current jobs in historic and cultural resources. Panelists will include:
 
– Linley Logan, Arts Program Manager, Northwest Heritage Program, the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center at the Evergreen State College.
– Sarah Steen, Landmarks Coordinator, King County
– Steve Stroming, Project Executive, Rafn Company
 
This virtual panel is FREE and open to all, and registrants will have the chance to submit questions for the panelists before and during the webinar. We hope you’ll join us for this exciting discussion, full of advice for students, young professionals, and anyone else interested in cultural resources and preservation! Click HERE to register now.
 

  • August 4, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. McMenamins Elks Temple Virtual History Pub – Outdoors for 100 Years: Eddie Bauer, the Down Jacket, and Adventure-Driven Innovation

The Pacific Northwest is known for its outdoor adventure opportunities, and a lot of fascinating history surrounds the outfitters and adventurers who created and used the equipment for excursions into the wild. Colin Berg, the Brand Historian for Eddie Bauer, shares the story of the man behind the name as well as the many Pacific Northwesterners who made the brand what it is today.  This event will be taking place on Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/historymuseum/live/
 

  • August 10 & 24, 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society – Speaking Out About Dreams That Matter. 

Speaking Out About Dreams That Matter is a two-part online presentation about people from throughout Tacoma’s history who have worked for social justice and civil rights. Featuring historic photos and media, as well as recent interviews, the presentation will be followed by a question and answer period with Kim Davenport, communications manager for Tacoma Historical Society. This presentation is a partnership between Tacoma Public Library and The Tacoma Historical Society with funding from Tacoma Creates. Registration is required, visithttp://tiny.cc/dreams10
 

  • August 19 thru 26. The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour Video Series Celebrating the National Women’s Suffrage Centennial. 

August 2020 marks the National Women’s Suffrage Centennial, and to celebrate, you are invited to climb aboard the digitally delivered Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour! This eight-episode video series explores our state’s connections to the larger national history of women’s suffrage, and honors Washington’s women change makers who led the way then as well as those who continue to do so today. It is thematically based on the real life 1909 Suffrage Special train which carried local and national suffragists across the country, and through Washington State from Spokane to Seattle in support of women’s fight for the vote. Ride along with the Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour! One segment will be posted daily from August 19-26 on the Historical Society and Votes for Women Suffrage Centennial Facebook pages, @washingtonhistory and @suffrage100wa and at the Washington State Historical Society page athttps://www.washingtonhistory.org/  . Each whistle stop segment will be hosted by a local historical organization and will explore women’s suffrage history and its legacy in their geographic region, as well as ties to national women’s suffrage efforts. The Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be hosting the segment on Olympia, taking place on August 26, Women’s Equality Day, and the date that the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified in 1920.
 
The 1909 National Suffrage Convention was–not coincidentally–held at the same time as the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition (AYPE). It was an important time in the fight for women’s suffrage and savvy suffragists took advantage of the significant visibility afforded by AYPE to promote their cause. And, did you know that Washington women permanently won the right to vote in 1910 (after several previous wins and losses of the right), a FULL DECADE before national women’s suffrage was enacted?
 
The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour schedule includes:
 
August 19 – Spokane
August 20 – Tri-Cities/Walla Walla
August 21 – Yakima/Ellensburg
August 22 – Vancouver
August 23 – Bellingham
August 24 – Seattle
August 25 – Tacoma
August 26 – Olympia
 
The Suffrage Special Whistle Stop Tour is presented in conjunction with Washington State Suffrage Centennial programming (details athttps://www.suffrage100wa.com/  ) through generous legislative support. Presented by the Washington State Historical Society and their partners, the Washington State Women’s Commission, Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, Pasco’s Franklin County Historical Society, Kittitas County Historical Society, Clark County Historical Society, Whatcom Museum, Tacoma Historical Society, and Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum.
 
For more information in this terrific event, visit https://www.washingtonhistory.org/event/the-suffrage-special-whistle-stop-tour/
 

  • August 26, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM. Olympia Film Collective – Artists Among Us, Chapter 1: Art Talk, Multimedia. 

Artists Among Us is a documentary series highlighting the local arts scene in South Puget Sound. Each month until October will feature new short documentary movies followed by a filmmaker’s panel. Movies will be premiered on the Olyfilm Facebook page, which can be reached at the Collective’s website, https://www.olyfilm.com/ .  This month’s films are:
 

7:00 PM – Building an Art Gallery Exhibition from Bill Lange
7:15 PM – Life Through Art from Jordie Simpson and Gracen Bayer
7:25 PM – Q&A with the filmmakers at  https://www.facebook.com/OlympiaFilmCollective/videos/285254149461813/
David Ponta
Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum
OHS&BHM PO Box 1821 Olympia, WA 98507
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Bulletin – 7/1/2020

July 1, 2020      
 
Washington State is slowly beginning to open back up, but many venues remain closed. Given the unpredictable nature of the pandemic, be sure to verify that any event you are considering has not been cancelled or rescheduled.

 

Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum is pleased to announce a major upgrade to the popular Sanborn Overlay feature of our website. Historical insurance maps from 1884, 1891, 1908, 1924, and 1947 are superimposed over contemporary aerials or basemaps. Buildings from our Where Are We? feature can also be located by turning on an optional layer in each series. The upgrade uses color maps, newly available from the Library of Congress, that add a great richness of detail. It also adds the 1947 series, which greatly expanded the area covered. Visit https://olympiahistory.org/the-sanborn-overlays/ for more information and to view these intriguing maps.
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  • University of Puget Sound (Tacoma) – Community Summer 2020: Virtual Classes.

Looking for ways to connect this summer? University of Puget Sound is excited to offer new virtual courses to foster connection and learning in the local community and beyond. Special interest classes are being offered in June and July and are open to the public. Explore such topics as civil rights history, business leadership, professional communications, classical music, rock and roll and family history archiving — all taught by inspiring Puget Sound faculty and staff in a live, interactive online format. Community Summer 2020 welcomes students of all ages. For details and to register, visitwww.pugetsound.edu/puget-sound-community-summer-2020/ Fees vary by class. 

  • July 13 – 17, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – Camp Fort Nisqually.

Ages 12 to 14! Discover what life was like at Puget Sound’s first trading post. With an in-depth look at the people and events that shaped the Fort’s history, you’ll learn 19th century skills such as blacksmithing and fire starting. Snacks and Friday lunch are provided. Please note that  while attending this event, guests, patrons and visitors ARE REQUIRED to use face coverings as well as maintain six feet of physical distance from non-household members and perform frequent hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. The new statewide requirement applies to all residents six years old an up. Children under age two are exempt. For kids age 3-5 masks are strongly encouraged. For information, visit https://www.metroparkstacoma.org/event/camp-fort-nisqually-2/ Fort Nisqually is located at 5400 N Pearl St #11 Tacoma.

  • July 14, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM. Grit City Think & Drink – Volcanic Ecology: Just Add Water. 

Dr. Carri LeRoy of The Evergreen State College current research focuses on how streams have developed in the 40 years since the eruption of Mt St Helens. The catastrophic lateral blast resulted in a massive landslide that covered forests and streams around Spirit Lake in up to 300 feet of sterile pumice and ash. Snowmelt, springs, and runoff have carved new watersheds across what is known as the Pumice Plain. New stream channels are being quickly colonized by willow, which is particularly interesting because they have both male and female individuals. In 2018, Dr. LeRoy was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for this research. This talk explores both new watershed development and the influence of willow sex on in-stream communities and ecosystem processes. Carri LeRoy has been a freshwater ecologist at The Evergreen State College since 2006. She completed her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences in 2005 at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, AZ, a Masters in Liberal Studies (Environmental Education) in 2001, and her undergraduate degrees in Environmental Science and International Studies at Oregon State University. She Co-Directed the Sustainability in Prisons Project from 2011-2017. Dr. LeRoy’s research focuses on how riparian forests interact with streams and provide energy through leaf litter fall. Her research has shown that both the species diversity and genetic diversity of these litter inputs can affect in-stream leaf litter decomposition rates, aquatic fungi and aquatic macro invertebrates. For event info, visit https://www.tacoma.uw.edu/sias/thinkndrink or call (253) 692-4450. This event is FREE and Kid-Friendly! 

  • July 23, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. Washington Center for the Performing Arts – 2020 Center Stage Virtual Gala. 

The Washington Center for the Performing Arts in Olympia is having a virtual fundraiser, including a terrific online auction!  For more information, visit
https://www.washingtoncenter.org/event/2020-center-stage-awards-gala/ 

  • July 28 – 31, 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – History Through the Arts. 

Ages 9 to 11! Travel back to the 1850’s, learning crafts, activities, music and games associated with the many different cultures that were part of Fort Nisqually. Snacks and lunch are provided. Please note that  while attending this event, guests, patrons and visitors ARE REQUIRED to use face coverings as well as maintain six feet of physical distance from non-household members and perform frequent hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. The new statewide requirement applies to all residents six years old an up. Children under age two are exempt. For kids age 3-5 masks are strongly encouraged. For information, visit https://www.metroparkstacoma.org/event/history-through-the-arts-camps/ Fort Nisqually is located at 5400 N Pearl St #11 Tacoma. 

  • City of Olympia – Marine Creature Mondays Video Series.

Visit https://streamteam.info/marine-creature-monday-videos/ to enjoy weekly marine education video posts showcasing  the amazing marine critters found under the sea in Puget Sound. Created by underwater videographer Matt Balder and Bob Wharton, marine biologist and narrator. 

  • City of Olympia – Purple Martin Citizen Science Lollapalooza. 

Looking for something new to do as you follow social distancing guidelines? Mid to late April marks the return of the largest swallows in North America, the purple martin. Strictly a Western Washington species, the martin is the least-common swallow and the only species of martins on this continent. Migrating to the Pacific Northwest and up into Canada from as far away as the Amazon River and southern Brazil, the martins return to their summer homesites delighting us with their aerial acrobatic flights. From April to September volunteers monitor the martin nest boxes weekly at East Bay in downtown Olympia. Attend a short training on monitoring basics and bird identification. No experience necessary. Pack your mask and binoculars and head out to monitor the East Bay purple martins. It’s easy, visit www.streamteam.info/purplemartin to download data sheets and directions!

  • Fort Nisqually Living History Museum – Fort Nisqually at Home! 

Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is offering some fascinating online explorations for all to enjoy. Watch Fort Skills Videos on everything from candle making to playing 19th century games such as CHARADES (yes, VERY Victorian!) , even create your own puppet show! Visit https://www.metroparkstacoma.org/activities-for-home/ for details on these terrific and KID FRIENDLY events! 

  • City of Olympia – Bats of the Pacific Northwest.  

Enjoy videos taken in real-time by local bat expert Greg Falxa.  Follow along as Greg talks about the various local  bat species and their adaptations for the habitat they (and WE!) live in. Visit https://streamteam.info/bat-videos-and-sounds/ for this amazing stor

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Bulletin – 4/1/2020

April 1, 2020      
 
As we are all now aware, most public venues, including museums, etc., have been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This bi-monthly Bulletin will now go on hiatus until the pandemic has subsided and these restrictions are lifted, with periodic deliveries in the interim for appropriate events readers may enjoy while observing these essential contact limitations. Highlighted below are just some of the  interesting online activities, events and resources you may participate in and enjoy.

 
Bigelow House Museum will remain closed until further notice.
 
Maintain that distance!
 
Stay safe!
 
STAY WELL!!!
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  • April 13 – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society: Musical History of Tacoma. 

Join the Tacoma Historical Society online for their Annual Meeting, which will be broadcasted live online due to current restrictions on public gatherings. The guest speaker this month will be Kim Davenport, who will share stories and music from her research into the Musical History of Tacoma. THS will share the link for the online broadcast HERE. Even if you miss watching it live, a video will be available for posterity afterwards.

  • Washington State Library – Washington State Research.

The Washington State Library has an amazing online presence for researching WA on all levels. Their Washington State Research page is an excellent starting point, and can be reached HERE.

  • Smithsonian Magazine Online: Virtual Travel – Ten Museums You Can Virtually Visit. 

The Smithsonian Institution has put together an excellent list of museums from across the globe which have terrific online content. Ranging from the Smithsonian itself in Washington DC, to the National Women’s History Museum in Alexandria, VA, to the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, Spain, and the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, there’s a lot to absorb, learn, and enjoy. The list can be found on the Magazine’s web site HERE.

  • Now Where Were We – YouTube Video Channel Dedicated to Local History. 

This is a series of videos about the history of Olympia and Lacey, Washington and surrounding areas. The videos are produced at PCTV, the television station for Panorama, a retirement community in Lacey, Washington. The host for the series is Deborah Ross, a local historian and author. The videos may be accessed on YouTube HERE.

  • Washington State History Museum – Online Collections. 

For the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic the Washington State History Museum is closed, but they encourage you to make good use of their online collections database! Pick a topic of interest, type in your search term (try dogs or WWI for example) and see what comes up! Begin your Washington History Search HERE.

  • Washington State Library – Primarily Washington.

Described as Washington’s Gateway to Pacific Northwest Primary Source Materials for Teachers and Students, Primarily Washington provides access to a huge array of information about our beautiful Evergreen State! The site can be found HERE.

  • Library of Congress – By the People. 

Want to help create the historical record?  How about doing some online transcribing of documents for the Library of Congress! What could be more fascinating? From papers written by Anna Dickinson, suffragist, abolitionist and the first woman to deliver a political address to the US congress, to Herencia, a collection of centuries of Spanish legal documents obtained by the Library in 1941, you will definitely find something here to pique your interests. These fascinating documents are just waiting for your attention, and can be found HERE.

  • Washington State Archives – What is Scribe?

Washington State also needs your transcription skills! Visit the Archives HERE to set up an account and get started!

  • Washington Rural Heritage – Community Digital Archives for Washington State.  

Washington Rural Heritage is a community memory project headquartered at the Washington State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State. The project brings together unique local history materials from libraries, museums, and private collections of citizens across Washington State. Search by community/county, format or date; if it’s central to rural WA, you will find it here! The archives can be accessed HERE.

  • Washington Secretary of State – Washington State Digital Archives.  

The Washington State Digital Archives are the nation’s first archives dedicated specifically to the preservation of electronic records from both State and Local agencies that have permanent legal, fiscal or historical value. Much of the archive can be accessed and searched HERE.

  • Washington State Council for the Social Studies – Washington State History.  

And if you were not able to find anything in one of the sites above to intrigue you during distancing, check out the many fascinating Washington State Council for the Social Studies Curriculum Links, which can be visited HERE.

  • KNKX Public Radio and the Washington State History Museum – Forgotten Prison: The Alcatraz You’ve Never Heard of.  

An excellent 6 part podcast on the now-abandoned prison on McNeil Island which operated for 136 years, just across the Sound from Lakewood. The podcast can be accessed HERE.
 

Stay Safe – Stay Well – MAINTAIN THAT DISTANCE!
David Ponta
Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum
OHS&BHM PO Box 1821 Olympia, WA 98507
To unsubscribe, send us an e-mail: olyhistory@gmail.com
Posted in 2020 Bulletins | Comments Off on Bulletin – 4/1/2020

Bulletin – 3/1/2020

March 1, 2020

We have some terrific History related events coming up in the first two weeks of March. From boating and banking to trees and treaties, there’s a little something for everyone to learn and enjoy!

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· March 4, 5:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): McMenamins Elks Temple History Pub – The Boys in the Boat: A Daughter Remembers.

The 1936 Summer Olympics are infamous for having taken place in Berlin, Germany, three years after Adolph Hitler came to power. Hitler vigorously attempted to use the Olympics to showcase and promote the Nazi state, with noted German film maker Leni Riefenstahl producing a two part movie titled Olympia, released in 1938, highlighting the event. Most noted for her 1935 pro-Hitler propaganda film Triumph of the Will, which promoted the dictator on a personal level, some critics at the time of Olympia’s release suggested that Riefenstahl had given a similar heroic portrayal to African American athlete Jesse Owens in the film. This is said to have not gone over well with the Nazi regime; Owens’ stellar performance infuriated Hitler, as it contradicted the notion of “Aryan Supremacy” which was central to Nazi ideology. Widely praised around the globe at the time of its release, Olympia was not shown in the US until 1940. And while Germany did win the largest number of medals in the 1936 Summer Olympics, with a total of 89 received, 33 being gold, the US came in second, with 56 medals won, 24 of which were gold. Among those taking home gold was the US rowing team, made up of nine young men from the State of Washington. Daniel James Brown’s critically acclaimed non-fiction novel The Boys in the Boat celebrates the 1936 U.S. men’s Olympic eight-oar rowing team. Nine working class boys from the Pacific Northwest stormed the rowing world, transformed the sport, and galvanized the attention of millions of Americans. Hear an explanation of the book’s genesis and stories from the daughter of Joe Rantz, one of those working class boys who made history. This event is free, and all ages are welcome to attend. Doors open at 5:30 PM. McMenamins Elks Temple is located at 565 Broadway, Tacoma.

· March 5, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society (Tacoma): Exhibit Opening and Book Launch – Bank on Tacoma: 1873-1993.

Join the Tacoma Historical Society Museum for the opening of their latest exhibit, Bank on Tacoma: 1873-1993, celebrating Tacoma’s rich banking history and unique financial challenges.

During the exhibit opening, the Society will also be celebrating the release of a new book by Deborah K. Freedman. Based on in-depth original research, Bank on Tacoma: 1873-1993 chronicles more than a century of banking history in Tacoma, Washington, which parallels the city’s growth and development. Free, all are welcome! This event is taking place at the Tacoma Historical Society Museum, 919 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma.

· March 7, 6:00 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Dance to Make a Difference 12th Annual Charity Gala.

Studio West Dance Theatre and Guild presents the 12th annual Dance to Make a Difference charity gala. This year, all net proceeds will be donated to Homeless Backpacks and Homes First. Both non-profit organizations provide support for homeless and low-income families in the South Sound community. The reception begins at 6:00 PM and includes a light dinner, wine, and live music. A silent auction will be held during the reception and intermission. At 8:00 PM, you are invited to the main-stage to enjoy a fantastic dance performance by Studio West Dance Theatre, Ballet Northwest, EDGE, Evergreen City Ballet, Johansen Olympia Dance Center, Momentum, Olympic Ballroom Dance, Powers Ballroom, Southwest Washington Dance

Ensemble, and Vibes Kru. The gala will feature a brand new choreographic work by Joshua Grant, soloist with Pacific Northwest Ballet. For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia.

· March 8, 2:00 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Silent Movie – The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Based on French author Victor Hugo’s 1831 novel of the same name, this epic 1923 silent film is recognized for its stunning sets depicting Paris in the 1400’s, and for Lon Chaney’s remarkable performance and make up as the tormented Quasimodo. World-class theater organist Dennis James brings the film to life on the theater’s historic 1924 treasure, The Mighty Andy Crow Wurlitzer Organ. For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia.

· March 9, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Tacoma Historical Society (Tacoma): Bruce Ramsey – Tacoma’s Experience of the Panic of 1893.

To complement their new exhibit on banking history, the author of The Panic of 1893 will recall the depression that devastated Tacoma just as the city was getting started. If you don’t yet have your copy of Bruce Ramsey’s book, the University of Puget Sound Bookstore will be on hand at the event to sell copies! This event is taking place at the Murray Board Room, Wheelock Student Center, University of Puget Sound, located at 1500 N Warner St, Tacoma.

· March 12, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House presents Women Who Dared.

Visit History Talks at Schmidt House for a discussion of early non-native female settlers in the Northwest. Guest speaker, author and former history teacher Dorothy “Dot” Wilson will answer questions such as who these women were, why they come here, and where they come from. Her talk will bring to life the stories of these brave women who dared to risk all to explore and pave the way for our pioneer ancestors. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit https://olytumfoundation.org/what-we-do/schmidt-house/ The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· March 14. 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. PNW Chapter of International Coleman Collectors Club (Lacey): 15th Annual Display of Vintage Coleman Lanterns, Stoves, and More.

So, you thought you’d heard of just about every possible specialized collector organization imaginable? Think again. There’s a group which is fixated solely upon Coleman products. And apparently, they are not even limited to the good ol’ USA. At this event, members of the PNW Chapter of the International Coleman Collectors Club will be displaying their collections of vintage Coleman lanterns, lamps, stoves, coolers and other items made by the company. Most remembered for fun things like camping equipment and other outdoor activity gear, Coleman also produced military items such as canteens, stoves and mess kits, but also more obscure equipment, like inflatable vests used by the Navy. Do you have a non-working Coleman item? Bring it in and Club members can show you how to get it operating again. Some collectors may have a few sales items. The event is family-friendly with numerous giveaways of new Coleman items. Also a raffle for a new Coleman ice chest! Taking place at the Best Western Plus Lacey Inn & Suites, 8326 Quinault Drive NE, Lacey.

· March 14. 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. WET Science Center and the Capital Land Trust (Olympia): Meet the Trees of Washington.

It’s called the EVERGREEN STATE for a reason.* TREES! Much of Washington is adorned with the big beauties, but what makes up that glorious veil of green? Come and learn about Washington’s forests! Join Capitol Land Trust for a presentation about trees as you sort leaves and identify the native trees of our state. Nature-related activities will be happening all day. This event is free, and is taking place at the WET Science Center (LOTT), 500 Adams St. NE, Olympia.

*Realtor and former newspaperman Charles Tallmadge Conover coined the phrase The Evergreen State, while working as chairman of the publicity committee of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce in the late 1800’s. His motivation had less to do with extolling our state’s stunning natural beauty than it did with the belief that the nickname would bring more settlers (i.e., home buyers) to the state. To accomplish this, Conover and business partner Samuel L. Crawford, along with Sound historian Frederic Grant produced the promotional booklet “Washington, The Evergreen State and Seattle, its Metropolis,” titled by Conover.

· March 14, 7:00 PM. South Puget Sound Community College, Kenneth J. Minnaert Center (Olympia): Peace Festival – A Celebration of Peace Through Music.

Under the motto Peace though Music. Quality through Inclusion, the Olympia Peace Choir has been a voice for global awareness, social consciousness, and environmental stewardship for a decade. With the resounding theme of It Takes a Village, this 100-voice community chorus will gather with choirs from around the Puget Sound in a joyful, inspiring celebration of peace through music. Guest choirs include the SPSCC Chorus and Vashon’s Free Range Folk Choir. As a service to the Olympia community, all Peace Choir performances are free and family-friendly. The Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· March 15, 2:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom (Lakewood): The 1854 Medicine Creek Treaty.

The Treaty of Medicine Creek was an agreement between the United States and the Nisqually, Puyallup, Steilacoom, Squawskin (Squaxin Island), S’Homamish, Stehchass, T’Peeksin, Squi-aitl, and Sa-heh-wamish nations which, under the treaty, were “regarded as one nation, on behalf of said tribes and bands, and duly authorized by them.” The treaty granted 2.24 million acres of land to the United States in exchange for the establishment of three reservations, cash payments over a period of twenty years, and recognition of traditional native fishing and hunting rights in the area. The privileges granted to the tribes were disputed until the Boldt Decision in 1974, which recognized native rights to half of the fish caught on traditional lands throughout the South Sound. Prior to Boldt, the tribes had been allowed much less. In addition, the initial rocky location of the Nisqually reservation was unacceptable to that nation, traditionally a riverside fishing people. The tribe went to war over this in 1855, which culminated in Nisqually Chief Leschi being hanged for murder. Leschi was exonerated in 2004, some 150 years later. Despite not being fully honored by non-natives until the 1970’s, the construction of Interstate 5 was redirected in the ’60’s to avoid destruction of the treaty signing location in Thurston County. The site, now in the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, was designated by Congress as the Medicine Creek Treaty National Memorial on December 18, 2015. Washington State Historian Erich Ebel will speak on the 1854 Medicine Creek Treaty at this event, taking place at Quarters 2. Admission to the lecture is free, but donations are always appreciated, and guided tours will be available for the standard fee. Historic Fort Steilacoom is located on the grounds of Western State Hospital at 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood, 253-582-583.

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Built in the fascinating Carpenter Gothic style in the 1850’s by Daniel Bigelow, an attorney and politician in Olympia, no history buff should miss touring the Bigelow House Museum. One of the oldest residential buildings in the North West, the House was added to the

National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Each guided tour lasts approximately 45 minutes, and after visiting the House, your name will be added to a long list of historically significant individuals including Snoqualmie Chief Patkanim, Suffragist Susan B. Anthony, and Confederate Army General George Edward Pickett, perhaps best know for the ill-fated Pickett’s Charge on the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. The Museum is located at 918 Glass Ave NE in Olympia. For our current tour schedule, please visit https://olympiahistory.org/calendar-of-events/ .

 

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Bulletin – 2/15/2020

February 15, 2020

This month is the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the US constitution, empowering women to vote! Join the League of Women Voters of Thurston County and the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum at a special event on February 15 celebrating the centenary of this vital amendment. This event will be held at the Bigelow House Museum, 918 Glass Avenue NE, Olympia, from 1 to 3 PM. Admission is by donation. Both the 200th anniversary of suffragist Susan B. Anthony’s birth and the 100th anniversary of the League of Women Voters will also be marked by this event. The program begins at 1:30 PM, and visitors will enjoy displays, music, and refreshments. Historic costumes are encouraged! Susan B. Anthony visited the Bigelow House in 1871, and the League was formed on February 14, 1920. For more information, visit www.olympiahistory.org

In honor of Black History Month, Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will co-sponsor a special program with the Olympia Heritage Commission titled Blacks in Thurston County: A Historical Perspective, presented by Dr. Thelma Jackson and Ed Echtle. This event is taking place on Saturday February 22, 2020 at 1:30 PM in Rooms 101-102 of the Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW in Olympia. Free to the public! Information is available at www.olympiahistory.org.

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George Washington and Centralia

George Washington was born in Virginia in 1817, the son of a black slave and a British woman. George’s mother left the boy with Anna and James Cochran/Cochrane, a white couple, who moved to Missouri with George, by way of Ohio. Washington’s business efforts in that area were impeded by the many racist laws then in place. Seeking greater liberty, George Washington moved west in 1850 via wagon train, eventually arriving in what would soon become the Washington Territory. In 1852, Washington opened a land claim in the Territory near the confluence of the Chehalis and Skookumchuck Rivers, where he would later establish the town of Centralia. Washington met and married Mary Jane Cooness/Cornie when in his 50’s, a widow of African American and Jewish ancestry. Realizing that their land’s location would be an important access point for the Northern Pacific Railroad between Kalama on the Columbia and Tacoma, the Washingtons endeavored to start a town on the site. On January 8, 1875, the family registered the plat for their town at the Lewis County courthouse in Chehalis, initially calling it “Centerville,” and later added more plats to increase the town’s size. The Washingtons donated space to their Baptist parish to construct a church and a cemetery, and also established a public square, now known as George Washington Park, located at 110 South Silver Street in Centralia. The town’s initial name of Centerville caused some confusion, since a town by that name already existed in Klickitat County, and the name was changed to Centralia in the early 1880’s. Centralia went on to be incorporated in 1886. When the Washington Territory became a state in 1889, Centralia had nearly 1,000 residents, a figure which more than tripled in the next two years. George’s wife Mary Jane Washington passed away in 1888. Washington remained an

active area civic leader, often cited for his willingness to help area residents in numerous ways, such as selling property for a small down payment, providing no-interest loans, and offering employment options when few were available. During the national economic downturn of 1893, George established private relief efforts for locals in need, frequently wagon trained into Oregon in order to bring back needed supplies ranging from rice and flour to sugar, and gave away bacon and lard he obtained in Chehalis. Washington did not evict residents for being late on mortgage payments, and bought up area properties which became available during the crash in order to increase the town’s size. By the end of the 19th century, Centralia began to recover economically, and though property values and residency had declined during the financial downturn, Centralia had about 1,600 residents in 1900. The town’s current population is estimated to be approximately 18,000. George Washington died on August 26, 1905, remaining active in local affairs up until his passing. He was 11 days short of his 88th birthday. The town of Centralia recognized George at the time of his death with a public funeral said to be the most attended in the city’s history. Washington’s service took place at the Baptist church he had helped establish, and he is buried in the Washington Lawn Cemetery, located at 706 West Pear Street in Centralia, which he had donated to the parish many years before.

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· February 15, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.

Please join the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, and the Thurston County League of Women Voters, for a celebration of the centenary of the women’s vote. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

· February 15, 2:00 PM. Olympia Family Theater (Olympia): Starry Messenger.

This stirring adaptation of the Newbery Award-winning book is set in Copenhagen in 1943. Young Annemarie and her family face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and face their darkest fears as they try to help their friend Ellen escape the Nazis across the ocean to safety in Sweden. Witness all the drama, adventure, and humor come to life on our stage that have made Number the Stars a national bestseller. Based on the Book by Lois Lowry, adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche & directed by Samantha Chandler. This show is recommended for ages 6 and over. For event Info, call (360) 570-1638 Admission is $20. The Olympia Family Theater is located at 612 4th Ave E, Olympia.

· February 15, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Lemay Car Museum (Tacoma): Unguarded Art Auction.

Incarcerated artists in prisons across Washington are raising money for social justice causes and victims of domestic violence through the Unguarded Art Auction at LeMay Car Museum. Admission is $10 and includes parking, partial museum access, tapas, and one drink ticket.

Attendees will be able to bid on more than 200 pieces of inmate-made art, including paintings, sculptures and Native American beading. All proceeds will be split among the YWCAs of Pierce, Kitsap, Seattle, King and Snohomish counties. Sponsors for the event include United HealthCare Community Plan, Department of Corrections, Pierce County Community Partnership for Transition Services and Numbers2Names, and the Washington State Combined Fund Drive. For more information, visit https://doc.wa.gov/news/2020/01242020.htm The Lemay Car Museum is located at 2702 East D. Street, Tacoma.

· February 20, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House

presents George Washington of Centralia.

Visit History Talks at Schmidt House for a discussion of the book George Washington of Centralia, presented by authors Brian Mittge and Kerry MacGregor Serl. Signed copies of their book will be available following the presentation. For more information about George

Washington and his role in the origin of Centralia, please see the header at the top of this Bulletin. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit https://olytumfoundation.org/what-we-do/schmidt-house/ The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· February 20, 3:00 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): Free Third Thursday!

On the Third Thursday of every month, admission to the Washington State History Museum is FREE OF CHARGE after 3:00 PM. For a list of upcoming events, visithttp://www.washingtonhistory.org/events.aspx?id=0 The Washington State History museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, (253) 272-3500.

· February 21, 4:30 AM – 6:30 PM. South Puget Sound Community College, Leonor R. Fuller Gallery (Olympia): Native American Art Exhibition Opening Reception.

SPSCC is pleased to welcome the Native American Art Exhibition back to the Leonor R. Fuller Gallery at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts. The exhibition will run from Feb. 18 – March 20, 2020, with the opening reception taking place Friday, Feb. 21, from 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM. This themed exhibition, shaped and selected by Native guest curators, engages viewers and the community celebrating the arts and culture of our Native community members. The exhibition will highlight work by adult and youth from local and regional tribes and Native artists from other locations who now live in the area. The exhibition is sponsored by the Nisqually Indian Tribe. The Gallery is open Monday through Friday from noon to 6:00 PM, excluding holidays. The Leonor R. Fuller Gallery at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· February 21, 7:30 PM. University of Puget Sound Schneebeck Concert Hall (Tacoma): Puget Sound Jacobsen Series – The Legacy of George Walker.

Dr. Gregory Walker, violinist, joins University of Puget Sound music faculty for this celebration of music by his father, George Walker (1922–2018), the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Performed by Gwynne Brown, piano; Kim Davenport, piano; Alistair MacRae, cello; Dawn Padula, mezzo-soprano; Joyce Ramee, viola; Tanya Stambuk, piano; Joseph Williams, piano; Jinshil Yi, piano. This event is taking place at the University of Puget Sound Schneebeck Concert Hall, 1500 N Warner St, Tacoma.

· February 22, 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Heritage Skills Workshop – Basketry.

Judy Bridges, a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, will lead a hands-on workshop in which participants will learn the basics of plaiting, twining and coiling cedar. Judy is descended from five fur traders and their Native American wives. She took up basketry in the early 1990’s, studying with both native and non-native teachers. Judy has been teaching and demonstrating basketry for nearly two decades, using both traditional and modern materials. You are invited to bring your own sack lunch to this event. Admission is $65, open to those ages 16 and older. Pre-registration required, visit http://apm.activecommunities.com/metroparkstacoma/Activity_Search/9069 . For more

information contact (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

· February 22, 1:30 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): Blacks in Thurston County.

Please join the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, and the Olympia Heritage Commission for a discussion of Black history in Thurston County. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

· February 24, 7:30 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Beatles Vs. Stones – A Musical Showdown.

Back by popular demand! Celebrate the history of rock ‘n roll by visiting the Main Stage for a Battle of the Bands. Two of the greatest groups of all time face off in a high-energy, adrenaline-pumping musical showdown. The Fab Four, represented by tribute band Abbey Road will engage in a barrage of hits against premier Rolling Stones tribute band Satisfaction. It’s a face-off you won’t want to miss! For more information, visit https://www.washingtoncenter.org/event/20-02-24-beatles-vs-stones/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE , Olympia.

· February 26, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Harbor History Museum (Gig Harbor) – Who Was Chief Seattle?

David Buerge, historian, teacher, writer, and author of fourteen books of history and biography, has been researching the pre- and early history of the City of Seattle since the mid-1970’s. A biographer and a historian to the Duwamish Tribe of Chief Seattle, David has spent more than 20 years exploring the man from a variety of sources to reveal a leader of epic character. His latest book, Chief Seattle and the Town that Took His Name, is the first biography of Chief Seattle intended for adults. Seattle wrote nothing down during his life, yet his words – both real and imagined – are known throughout the world. The result is a man made up of both historical and fictional aspects, from which conflicting messages can be gleaned. Visit the Harbor History Museum for an authoritative and insightful discussion of this fascinatingly significant leader.

Admission is free, but seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, contact operations@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722. The Harbor History Museum is located at 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor.

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Bulletin – 2/1/2020

February 1, 2020

This month is the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the US constitution, empowering women to vote! Join the League of Women Voters of Thurston County and the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum at a special event on February 15 celebrating the centenary of this vital amendment. This event will be held at the Bigelow House Museum, 918 Glass Avenue NE, Olympia, from 1 to 3 PM. Admission is by donation. Both the 200th anniversary of suffragist Susan B. Anthony’s birth and the 100th anniversary of the League of Women Voters will also be marked by this event. The program begins at 1:30 PM, and visitors will enjoy displays, music, and refreshments. Historic costumes are encouraged! Susan B. Anthony visited the Bigelow House in 1871, and the League was formed on February 14, 1920. For more information, visit www.olympiahistory.org

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The practice of annually reflecting upon African-American history in the U.S. began in 1926, when the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, established in 1915, declared the 2nd week in February to be Negro History Week. February was officially recognized as Black History Month by President Gerald Ford in 1976, during the bicentennial celebration.

One of Washington state’s most significant early settlers of color was John Newington Conna. Born into slavery in 1836 in Augustine, TX to an Irish immigrant father and an unknown black mother, Conna became a free man during the Civil War, when he served in the 1st Louisiana Native Guards, an African-American Union Regiment. John Conna lived in Hartford, Connecticut, and later Kansas City, Kansas, before taking the new transcontinental railroad to Tacoma in 1883 when he, his wife, Mary, and their children became the first African-Americans to travel by train to Puget Sound, eventually occupying a 157-acre homestead on the south side of Panther Lake, just north of Tacoma. Not long after settling in the area, Conna began working for Allen C. Mason real estate, becoming its leading broker. Allen Mason himself was also an interesting Tacoman, and initially one of the area’s most successful businessmen. In the panic of 1893 Mason, then 37 years old and generally considered a person of integrity, stood by his promise to buy back houses from anyone who could no longer afford them, losing all of his money in the process. Conna, finding success in the field, opened his own real estate firm In 1890. He also recruited African-Americans from other parts of the country to migrate to the Pacific Northwest, including coal miners who settled in Roslyn. Conna soon entered politics as president of the John Brown Republican Club and the Washington State Protective League. He joined the local chapter of the Afro-American League, a group which eventually led to the NAACP. In 1889, Conna became the first African-American in Washington state to be appointed to the Washington State Legislature when he was selected as Sergeant at Arms for the Legislature’s very first assembly. In that position, he was central to the creation of the Public Accommodations Act of 1890, which gave all citizens the right to access public establishments such as restaurants, inns, and public transport. John and wife Mary also donated some 40 acres of land to the City of Tacoma, an area referred to today as the Conna Addition. Like many Americans, John caught “Gold Fever” at the age of 64, and relocated to Fairbanks, Alaska towards the end of the Klondike gold rush, where he also worked in real estate and other investments. Conna ran unsuccessfully for the Fairbanks City Council and the Alaska Territorial Senate. One of Alaska’s last living Civil War veterans, John Newington Conna died in 1921 at age 85. He is buried in the historic Clay Street Cemetery in Fairbanks.

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· February 3, 7:30 PM. Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage (Olympia): Love in the Time of the Civil War.

The South Puget Sound Community College Artist & Lecture Series continues with author and educator Dolen Perkins-Valdez’s lecture on the topic of Love in the Time of the Civil War. Perkins-Valdez is acclaimed for her best-selling debut novel Wench, a complicated story that explores the moral complexities of slavery. Wench was awarded the First Novelist Award by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association in 2011. Dolen teaches in the Stonecoast MFA program in the state of Maine, and is a popular guest for Black History and Women’s Month programs. A graduate of Harvard and a former University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at UCLA, Dolen lives in Washington, DC with her family. For more information, visit Washington Center Main Stage The Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· February 4 & 5, 9:00 AM – 8:00 PM & 7:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Washington State Historical Society (Olympia): Arts, Heritage & Science Days.

Join the Washington State Historical Society for two days of workshops and networking in Olympia. There will be presentations on celebrating women’s suffrage in your community, the Heritage Capital Projects grant, tips for emergency preparedness and a small museums roundtable covering topics including collections care, volunteer recruitment and membership programs. The workshops will be followed by a reception hosted by the Washington Museum Association. The cost is for the event on the 4th is $15, which includes lunch, the events on the 5th are free. For the full schedule and registration information for both dates, visit Arts, Heritage & Science Days February 4 events are taking place at the Lord Mansion, 211 21st Ave SW, Olympia, the February 5 events are taking place at the Cherborg conference rooms A,B, & C, 304 15th Ave SW, Olympia.

· February 4, 5:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): McMenamins Elks Temple History Pub – Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Principal’s Office?

Beginning as early as preschool, Black students are disproportionately suspended and expelled from school. As many of these students reach adulthood, these punishments can lead to what some call the School-to-Prison Pipeline that affects many Black communities. Why are Black students punished more than others in the classroom? Based on his extensive research and teaching experience, Dr. Daudi Abe, a professor, writer, and historian who holds an MA in human development and holds a PhD in education from the University of Washington, demonstrates that the racial achievement gap cannot be solved without first addressing the discipline gap. Crucial questions must be faced: What is the difference between subjective and objective forms of discipline? What is “academic self-esteem” and “Cool Pose?” And in a state where 90% of teachers are white and the student body is only 56% white, would a more diverse teaching staff help? Does the discipline gap affect other communities of color? And what solutions can we can learn to help ALL students succeed? This event is free, and all ages are welcome to attend. Doors open at 5:30 PM. McMenamins Elks Temple is located at 565 Broadway, Tacoma.

· February 6, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House presents Cowlitz Farm.

Visit History Talks at the Schmidt House for an illustrated discussion presented by Josiah Pollock about the Cowlitz Farm in Lewis County, a part of the Puget Sound Agricultural Company. Pollock, a historian with the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum in Tacoma, will highlight the Farm’s connection to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the key role the Farm played in the development of Washington state. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis

and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit www.olytumfoundation.org The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· February 6 & 8, 14 & 15, 6:00 PM, 7:45 PM, 9:30 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Arrested – Escape Fort Nisqually.

Enter the fort by candlelight and embark on an epic adventure through time in Tacoma’s newest escape room experience. Arrested: Escape Fort Nisqually, a sequel to the Fort’s critically-acclaimed and award-winning escape game, Trapped, transports players back in time once again. Your team will race against the clock to recover company secrets before they fall into the wrong hands. Arrested can accommodate 10 people per game and lasts approximately 1 hour. Tickets are $30 person, ages 14 and up. For more information contact (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

· February 11, 5:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): Latinx Labor & Immigrant Rights Panel Discussion

Visit the Washington State History Museum for a panel discussion held in conjunction with the exhibit In Washington’s Fields: Photographs by David Bacon, featuring the captivating work of this photo journalist, author, activist and organizer. Following the panel conversation, Bacon will lead a tour through the exhibition, which opens February 1 and will be on view through May 10, 2020. The panel has been organized by Dr. Michael Honey, University of Washington Tacoma’s Haley Professor of Humanities and Labor Solidarity Project Chair. In addition to Bacon, panelists will include Rosalinda Guillen, director of Community2Community, which helped workers organize at Sakuma Farms, Ramon Torres, president of the new farm workers union Familias Unidas por la Justicia, and UWT Associate Professor Vanessa deVeritch Woodside. Farm workers and community members will also participate in the conversation about worker and immigrant rights in Washington State. Quoting Dr. Honey, “Immigrant’s and worker’s rights can hardly be separated in today’s climate of racism and repression at the border and in the notorious detention centers of ICE in Tacoma and elsewhere.” This exhibit and discussion are designed to shine a light on the continuing struggle of farm workers for a degree of dignity and justice. The Washington State History museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, (253) 272-3500.

· February 12, 5:30 PM. City of Lacey, Washington (Lacey): History Talks! The African American Legacy in Washington State.

To celebrate African American History Month, Lacey Museum is privileged to host retired University of Washington professor Dr. Quintard Taylor, with a presentation about the broader aspects of our region’s African American history. In 2004, Taylor created an online website resource center for African American history called BlackPast.org which contains an amazing array of information from encyclopedia-type entries and audio and video recordings to first-hand accounts of important events. He has also written numerous books and articles on African American history. This event is taking place at the Lacey City Hall Council Chambers, 420 College St SE., Lacey.

· February 14, 7:30 PM. Washington Center Main Stage (Olympia): Silent Movie – Lucky Star

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with someone special by visiting the Main Stage for a presentation of the silent classic Lucky Star, a powerful romance starring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell, once known as “America’s Favorite Lovebirds.” World-class theater organist Dennis James brings the film to life on the theater’s historic 1924 treasure, The Mighty Andy Crow Wurlitzer Organ. Make your Valentine’s Day a unique experience to remember! For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Washington Center Main Stage is located at 512 Washington St. SE , Olympia.

· February 15, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.

Please join the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum, and the Thurston County League of Women Voters, for a celebration of the centenary of the women’s vote. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

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Bulletin – 1/15/20

January 15, 2020

The Annual Meeting of the Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be held Saturday, January 25, from 1:00-3:00 PM at 405 Columbia Street SW in downtown Olympia, location of the Olympia Odd Fellows Lodge No. 1, which is co-sponsoring the event. There will be a program celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which empowered women to vote nationally. The program, open to the public, is entitled Olympia’s Role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement. We will also be recognizing the Olympia Lodge of Odd Fellows No. 1, The United Churches of Olympia, and the Ira L. Cater Post 318 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), for 100 or more years of service to the Olympia community. Finally, we will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Bigelow House designation on the National Register of Historic Places with refreshments. The program will be followed by the annual business meeting. Lots of anniversaries to celebrate–please join us! For more information, visit https://olympiahistory.org

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· January 15, 7:00 AM – 8:00 AM. Washington State History Society (Tacoma): Heritage Caucus.

The Heritage Caucus meets regularly while the Washington State Legislature is in session to discuss heritage, arts, and other cultural and recreational issues. Organized in 1990, the Caucus is a bipartisan gathering of state legislators and other elected officials; staff from state heritage, arts, and cultural agencies, and nonprofit organizations; and citizens interested in supporting Washington’s culture, heritage and the arts. Among the topics discussed during this session will be Preservation of a Cultural Heritage Site at the Wenatchee River Confluence, with City of Wenatchee Mayor Frank Kuntz & Economic Development Director Steve King and Wenatchi P’Squosa Elder Randy Lewis. This event is taking place at the Cherberg Building, Room A-B-C, 304 15th Ave SW Olympia.

· January 15, 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM. Thurston County League of Women Voters (Olympia): Forum on the Census and Redistricting.

The 2020 Census will take place this year, and will be the first U.S. census to offer options to respond on line, by phone, or by writing. Among other things, the census will determine the number of seats for the U.S. House of representatives and the number of delegates for the Electoral College. In 2021, the State of Washington Redistricting Commission will use the census results to begin the process of “redistricting,” determining the number and geographical locations of congressional and state legislative districts. The League of Women Voters played a major role in the formation of Washington’s bipartisan Redistricting Commission. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information, visit Thurston County League of Women Voters at http://www.lwvthurston.org/ This event will take place at the Olympia Center, 222 Columbia Street NW, Olympia.

· January 16, 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM. Olympia World Affairs Council (Olympia): Speaker Series – Bolsonaro and the Resurgence of Brazilian Fascism.

Jonathan Warren, Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, will discuss how right-wing populism is on the rise globally, especially in those parts of the world which had aggressively embraced neoliberal modes of capitalism. Brazil is emblematic of this often very violent process. Examples include the assassination of political opponents, the harassment of critics of the status quo, ethnic-cleansing of indigenous peoples,

environmental plunder, mass extermination of working-class communities of color, and unprecedented levels of violence against women and people of different gender identities. Jonathan Warren will discuss how this movement caught most off guard, both in and outside of Brazil, in large measure because they misunderstood the source of the economic uptick in the 2000’s, underestimated the fatigue people had with violence and corruption, misread the reasons for the rise of evangelical Christianity, ignored the authoritarianism at the heart of Brazilian day to day culture, and failed to appreciate the centrality of racism to Brazilian society. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://www.olympiawac.org/ This event is taking place at the SPSCC Lacey campus, Thurston Economic Development Council, 4220 6th Ave SE Lacey

· January 18, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum (Tacoma): Heritage Skills Workshop – Butchering and Curing.

Sign-up now for this heritage skills workshop to learn skills in butchering and curing methods from the 19th Century. The instructors from Farmstead Meatsmith will demonstrate traditional seam-butchery where only knives and cleavers are used. Participants will learn how waste is completely eliminated through traditional methods. There will also be a focus on principles of traditional nitrate-free whole-muscle curing, starting bacon, prosciutto and guanciale. Finally, the workshop will focus on basic cooking methods and how all this work ultimately serves the home table. This class is a day-long, intimate observational experience, with occasional hands-on opportunities. Bring your own sack lunch and filming/recording devices. Open to ages 16+ admission price is $100. Pre-registration is required, which can be done online by visiting http://apm.activecommunities.com/metroparkstacoma/Activity_Search/9068. For more information call (253) 404-3970. The Fort Nisqually Living History Museum is located at 5400 N. Pearl St., Tacoma.

· January 19, 2:00 PM. Historic Fort Steilacoom (Lakewood): Winter Storms at the Fort.

Historian and author Dennis Larsen will speak on winter storms affecting life at the Fort. Quarters 2 at 2 p.m. Complimentary admission to lecture, donations are accepted, and guided tours available for the standard fee. And speaking of DONATIONS, do you have any used books you’d like to give to a good cause? The Historic Fort Steilacoom Association conducts an annual used book sale. If you have used books you would like to dispose of your donation will support the research center of the museum. Donations will be accepted on the following dates: 1/5, 1/19, 2/2, 3/1 & 3/15. Donations may be delivered to Quarters 2. Contact info@historicfortsteilacoom.org for more information. Historic Fort Steilacoom is located on the grounds of Western State Hospital at 9601 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood, 253-582-583.

· January 20, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day at the Museum!

Join the Washington State History Museum in honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr! Admission to the museum and all activities will be FREE on this day. Tacoma Arts Live’s Civil Rights Tour will present two performances of Get on the Bus, at 1:30 PM & 3:30 PM. Seating is limited. Participate in art making throughout the day. Explore the exhibition Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth. and learn about other African American men who have changed culture and history in our nation. Join ONYX Fine Arts Collective artists to learn about their unique styles which celebrate and promote the visual artwork of artists of African descent. Families can try their own hands on art making. The Write253 Pop Up Print Shop will also be open. The Washington State History museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, (253) 272-3500.

· January 20, 7:00 PM. Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage (Olympia): King and “The More Perfect Union.”

Join South Puget Sound Community College and historian Dr. Rich Benjamin this Martin Luther King Jr. Day for a lecture titled King and “The More Perfect Union,” part of the 2019-20 Artist & Lecture Series. Dr. Rich Benjamin is a sharp observer of modern society and politics and is the author of Searching for Whitopia: An Improbable Journey to the Heart of White America. For more information, visit http://www.washingtoncenter.org/venue/washington-center-main-stage/ The Kenneth J. Minnaert Center Main Stage is located at 2011 Mottman Rd. SW, Olympia.

· January 23, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): History Talks at Schmidt House presents The Mason County History Museum.

Mason county’s history is emblematic of the South Sound in many ways, including timber, oysters, shipping, and railroads. Schmidt House welcomes former director of the Mason County History Museum Kristin Fabry to History Talks, during which she will focus on the history of Mason county with stories brought to life in the Museum. Kristin’s illustrated presentation may inspire viewers to personally visit the Mason County History Museum in Shelton. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit www.olytumfoundation.org The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· January 25, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum (Olympia): Annual Meeting.

Please join us for our ANNUAL MEETING, taking place at the historically significant Olympia Odd Fellows Lodge No. 1 in downtown Olympia. See the header at the top of the Bulletin for full details!

· January 29, 5:30 PM. City of Lacey, Washington (Lacey): History Talks! Lacey’s Role in Radio History.

Longtime broadcaster and community activist Dick Pust will discuss how one of the first radio stations in the nation got its start in Lacey. Illustrated with many historic images, he will also share how radio helped shape the lives of local residents. Pust, who spent more than 50 years in local broadcasting, will share his personal recollections including that time Hollywood superstar Bob Hope visited Lacey in the 1970’s. This event is taking place at the Lacey City Hall Council Chambers, 420 College St SE., Lacey.

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Bulletin – 1/1/20

January 1, 2020

The Annual Meeting of Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum will be held Saturday, January 25, 2020 from 1:00-3:00 p.m. at the Olympia Lodge of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 1, 405 Columbia Street SW, in downtown Olympia. There will be a program celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which empowered women to vote nationally. The program, open to the public, is entitled “Olympia’s Role in the Women’s Suffrage Movement.” We will also be recognizing three local organizations on 100 or more years of serving the Olympia community. They are the Olympia Lodge of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 1, The United Churches of Olympia, and Ira L. Cater Post No. 18, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Finally, we will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Bigelow House designation on the National Register of Historic Places with refreshments. The program will be followed by the annual business meeting. Lots of anniversaries to celebrate–please join us!

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· January 1 & 2, 4:00 PM + 7:00 PM. Olympia Film Society (Olympia): Fantastic Fungi.

Paul Stamets is an author, mycologist (i.e., FUNGUS EXPERT), medical researcher and entrepreneur living in Shelton, working to deepen the understanding and respect for the organisms that literally exist under every footstep we take. His central premise is that habitats have immune systems, just like people, and that mushrooms are cellular bridges between the two. Paul’s philosophy is that “MycoDiversity is BioSecurity.” He sees the fungal genome of the ancient Old Growth forests of the Pacific Northwest as a resource of incalculable value on many levels. His passion is to preserve and protect as many ancestral strains of mushrooms as possible from these pristine woodlands. Visit the Olympia Film Society’s presentation of Fantastic Fungi at the Capital Theater for a unique discussion of these organisms to which most give little thought, beyond which pizza toppings to consider. This Olympia Film Society event takes place at the Historic Capitol Theater, 206 5th Avenue SE, Olympia.

· January 7, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM. Harbor History Museum (Gig Harbor): Gig Harbor Literary Society – The Sea Runners.

Acclaimed author Ivan Doig wrote ten books, including 3 non fiction works, perhaps highlighted by his memoir The House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind, about the Author’s upbringing in Montana. Visit the Harbor History Museum for an evening discussion of Doig’s work The Sea Runners, which tells the story of four indentured servants of Scandinavian descent who flee bondage in Russia-controlled Alaska in 1853. Quoting the publisher, “The four sea runners must weather the worst the ill-named Pacific can throw at them, and must weather their own fierce squalls, too, as day upon day, guided as much by instinct and determination as by map, they paddle through the magnificent maze of the Northwest Coast toward the mouth of the Columbia River.” This event is FREE and open to the public. Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. You are welcome to bring your own wine! Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, contact operations@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722. The Harbor History Museum is located at 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor.

· January 7, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. Washington State History Museum (Tacoma): McMenamins Elks Temple History Pub – Whiskey, Mixologists, and the Pacific Northwest.

Northwest native Renee Cebula is passionate about history. A former history educator, her research focus turned to Cocktail Culture in America during the World Wars. The deeper she delved into this topic, the more her intellectual curiosities expanded to include America’s long and convoluted drinking history, the development of specialized tools and equipment, and the stories of mid-century decorative artists as they relate to drinking. Relax at McMenamins Elks Temple and hear fascinating tales of cocktail history from this local expert on the sometimes taboo subject! Food and drink available for purchase in McMenamins Elks Club’s beautiful Spanish Ballroom. This event is a partnership between the Washington State Historical Society and McMenamins Elks Temple, 565 Broadway, Tacoma. Doors open at 5:30 PM.

· January 8, 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM. Thurston County Chamber (Olympia): Chamber Forum – State of the Communities.

At the Chamber’s January meeting, Olympia Mayor Cheryl Selby, Lacey Mayor Andy Ryder, Tumwater Mayor Pete Kmet, Yelm Mayor JW Foster, and Thurston County Commissioner John Hutchings will collectively present a State of the Community address at the Forum. Representatives will share the state of their jurisdiction, and then will address moderated topics, including, but not limited to housing issues and job growth. For information, visit chambermaster.com/events/ This forum is taking place at Hotel RL Olympia 2300 Evergreen Park Dr SW Olympia. Cost is $35 general admission, $25 for online prepaid Chamber members and $30 for members at the door.

· January 9, 11:30 AM. Schmidt House (Tumwater): Edward Jay Allen in Early Olympia.

Edward Jay Allen came to Puget Sound in December of 1852, via the Oregon Trail. After arriving following a very harrowing journey, he built a small cabin on Budd Inlet north of Olympia on land he received through his Donation Land Claim. A major aspect of Allen which set him apart from most white settlers was that he actually paid native peoples for the land before taking up residence. Edward kept a diary of his activities which, combined with letters sent back to family in the East all along his journey, became the basis for two fascinating books about Edwards, written by Schmidt House archives Curator Karen Johnson and historian & author Dennis Larsen. Visit Schmidt House for a fascinating talk by the authors on this unique Pacific Northwest settler. Signed copies of their books will be available for purchase during the event. Doors open at 11:30 AM on a first come, first seated basis and the doors close when the house reaches capacity. For more information, call 360-786-8117 or visit www.olytumfoundation.org The Schmidt House is located just off Custer Way in Tumwater at 330 Schmidt Place.

· January 9, 6:00 PM. The Port of Olympia (Olympia): Waterfront Project Open House.

The Port of Olympia, Frank Family and Squaxin Island Tribal Council are proposing a joint project along the East Bay trail and park at NorthPoint. Attend this meeting to learn about the proposed conceptual design and timeline. This event is free and open to the public, and is taking place at the Lacey Conference Center, 975 Carpenter Rd in Lacey.

· January 10, 10:15 AM. Senior Services for South Sound (Olympia): A Conversation on Civil Rights.

Senior Services for South Sound invite the community to an engaging conversation with Dr. Sherman Beverly, Gary Gerst, and Sara Theissen about Civil Rights today and yesterday. The civil rights movement, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and many other men and women, brought significant change to our nation, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Despite these laws, discrimination and unequal treatment of people not in the majority persists. The civil rights movement continues today in a modern version, exemplified by Black

Lives Matter. For information, contact Sara Thiessen by dialing 360-586-6181 or sars@southsoundseniors.org This event is free and open to the public, and is taking place at the Olympia Senior Center, 222 Columbia St NW in Olympia.

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